Is it Ok to Leave The Employment Months Off of Your Resume?

NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
I was laid off in February of this year and I have been looking for work. I was getting a lot of interviews, but something came up which caused me to stop looking for work.  Now I'm able to look for work again.   I'm wondering if having the months of employment on my resume will hurt me in the long run?   Currently, my resume shows that I have been out of work for 7-8 months. 

In the past I have had recruiters tell me they wanted the months of employment on the resume.    I do know that removing the months makes it look like you still work at the job, even though you are not working there. 
What are our guys and gals thoughts on this topic?
When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

--Alexander Graham Bell,
American inventor

Comments

  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,774 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I ignored gaps by just filling out years that I was employed but you might find it tricky if you give them the impression you are still employed.

    In the end I would say try both if you are not getting any hits. You have to do whatever works as long as you can justify it in an interview.

    Good Luck!
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,544 Admin
    It's up to the hiring managers and recruiters to decide if they care about the months or not. I suppose you might run the risk of not being called for a first-round interview because your resume looks "deceptive" or incomplete without proper dating. I have the exact dates of my hiring/leaving on my resume entries, which certainly does not look like I'm trying to hide anything. As a hiring manager myself, I want to know the exact work durations down to the month for any candidate I will spend my time interviewing.
  • MrsWilliamsMrsWilliams Junior Member Member Posts: 192 ■■■■□□□□□□
     I'm wondering if having the months of employment on my resume will hurt me in the long run? 
    In the past I have had recruiters tell me they wanted the months of employment on the resume.    I do know that removing the months makes it look like you still work at the job, even though you are not working there. 
    What are our guys and gals thoughts on this topic?
    I worked for a company in recent years that basically fact checked employment. The company that I work for now fact checks education. Certification are easy as long as you provide the certification number.

    Some of the more bigger organizations go through different outside agencies that provide employment verification. I don't know how but I do know at my last job I got the finalized employment verification from the company (I forgot the name) and it had every job I ever worked and the dates...somehow someway.

    With that being said, I wouldn't want to get caught up in a Lie. Companies are getting smarter and using outside companies like, HireRight to do employment verification. 

    I will say, it depends.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,495 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I'd consider listing years if you have large gaps.....
  • Johnhe0414Johnhe0414 A+, Network+, Security+, Project+ USA, CARegistered Users Posts: 156 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I left a job because of a shift in "management" which caused the work place to be an unhealthy environment. I was able to take about a year off, during that time i got three certifications, exercise, lose some weight  and when i was asked, i simply said i used that time to work on my education (I had passed 3 certs). I was able to get a job after 3 or 4 interviews. Don't let the gap hold you back, be confident, be yourself and be ready to tackle an interview.
    Current:  A+ | Network+ | Project+ |Security+
    Working on: Cysa+
  • Infosec_SamInfosec_Sam Security+, CCENT, ITIL Foundation, A+ Madison, WIAdmin Posts: 448 Admin
    This is a pretty interesting topic, since your two options clearly both have benefits and drawbacks. I feel like once you land a phone interview, you can explain why you have the gap in employment and there won't be a big issue with it. If I was a hiring manager, I would bring in anyone with the skill set I was looking for, regardless of employment gaps. I really don't know if there's a definitive answer as to which way will get you more calls, so I'd just go with whichever one feels more natural to you.
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  • LonerVampLonerVamp OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, CCNA Cyber Ops, Sec+, Linux+, AWS SAA, CCSK Member Posts: 460 ■■■■■■□□□□
    This gets weird. For me, I sometimes read into resumes quite a bit. If I see someone playing the date game by only putting down years, I pretty much know what they're trying to do.

    That said, it gets *really* weird when a manager starts out an interview assuming you still work somewhere, and you inform them you do not. It begs that eyebrow raise an follow-up questions.

    I'd personally want to give dates, and explain gaps if pointedly asked. Sometimes it's just a break/vacation you can put in there. The investing in yourself, education, and finding yourself are always good reasons.

    Lastly, it gets mega weird if you're not in a large market, and everyone in IT is about 1-2 people removed from everyone else. (Namely: Don't ever get fired for preventable reasons. Being young is ok...but demonstrate learning from it.)

    Security Engineer/Analyst/Geek, Red & Blue Teams
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  • Johnhe0414Johnhe0414 A+, Network+, Security+, Project+ USA, CARegistered Users Posts: 156 ■■■■□□□□□□
    ... "I would bring in anyone with the skill set I was looking for, regardless of employment gaps."
    Agreed! These are the kinds of organizations that you WANT to work for.
    Current:  A+ | Network+ | Project+ |Security+
    Working on: Cysa+
  • dontstopdontstop Member Posts: 578 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited August 2019
    I've found that best policy is to be honest and upfront. My 2 year gap in my CV was a failed attempt at a 2nd Degree. I told all the companies I interviewed at that I had a change of heart in my career direction and realized my heart was still in IT. Be honest, nothing to hide and you won't stress or appear stressed about the question in your interview. People know that everyone's path in their career isn't 100% straight. As long as you weren't in prison for those 7-8 months, own your life story. If the company cannot handle it, maybe their not the best fit for you. 
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,871 Mod
    I just worked an "insider" incident where the candidate was caught lying on work experience. Not gaps, but making personal business pass as employment. Stupid move given all the OSINT out there. Offer was rescinded and individual blackballed from the company. 

    IMHO just be honest. Saves everyone a lot of time.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,291 ■■■■■■■■■□
    but making personal business pass as employment. 
    Just curious, why does self employed not count as employment?  He was working and getting experience doing things.  And it was his job.  As long it was legit work I guess I would wonder why it matters.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,871 Mod
    Agree. Complex story here, but let's just say nothing matched what he claimed. 
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited August 2019
     I'm wondering if having the months of employment on my resume will hurt me in the long run? 
    In the past I have had recruiters tell me they wanted the months of employment on the resume.    I do know that removing the months makes it look like you still work at the job, even though you are not working there. 
    What are our guys and gals thoughts on this topic?
    I worked for a company in recent years that basically fact checked employment. The company that I work for now fact checks education. . 


    I worked at a place were this happened.  The company would go through your entire background, and I was subject to the same background check as the people we supported.  There were a few that were let go in each phase or class, because they couldn't pass the education background check.  Basically, they lied about their education.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • TechGromitTechGromit A+, N+, GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 1,976 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited August 2019
    I was laid off in February of this year and I have been looking for work. I was getting a lot of interviews, but something came up which caused me to stop looking for work. 
    I would think you need some kind of explanation for this gap, "something came up", is kinda vague, if you don't want to tell them the truth, make up something believable, like my Son was in an accident, lost mobility and I had to nurse him back to health, or you were drafted by the Star League to engage Xur and the Ko-Dan Armada in a space battle.  What ever works. 
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I was laid off in February of this year and I have been looking for work. I was getting a lot of interviews, but something came up which caused me to stop looking for work. 
    I would think you need some kind of explanation for this gap, "something came up", is kinda vague, if you don't want to tell them the truth, make up something believable, like my Son was in an accident, lost mobility and I had to nurse him back to health, or you were drafted by the Star League to engage Xur and the Ko-Dan Armada in a space battle.  What ever works. 

    I had surgery for something that was very random, and totally came out of left field.  I needed to take time off after the surgery to heal. How do I explain this during the interview process if it's brought up? 
    Do I explain this during the interview?  
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,544 Admin
    Yes, you should truthfully explain every gap in your employment history if asked. In this case, everyone has had an unexpected illness or medical emergency, so the interviewers will understand. They will also be aware of the legal limitations of asking too much about a candidate's medical history.

    In an interview, you are also being evaluated on your personal character. If you start to sound like you are lying, cheating, or otherwise hiding something then the interview can go downhill pretty quickly. 
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,093 Mod
    I'm a bit confused. So the companies check employment history AFTER the offer has been made? I've always had companies check my employment records/policy check/education check BEFORE making an offer - it's a formality usually.
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,580 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I always include months. Every resume that I have seen always included months as well.
    Alphabet soup: CISSP, CCSP, CISM, CISA, GPEN, GCIA, GCIH, GCCC, CEH, Azure Fundamentals, etc

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  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,495 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited August 2019
    It hasn't be mentioned in this thread, but I would also consider pruning your resume.  Only listing 8 - 12 years of experience.  Of course if you have a job where you were there 15 years then you have to go back, but eventually pruning should organically start taking off some of those gaps.  

    I'm dating myself but I had a 3 month gap YEARS ago, it's "rolled" off the resume so to speak.....
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
    UnixGuy said:
    I'm a bit confused. So the companies check employment history AFTER the offer has been made? I've always had companies check my employment records/policy check/education check BEFORE making an offer - it's a formality usually.


    For the recruiting companies:  (contracts)
    You get an offer first, and then you do the paper work.  You will need to fill out the application, background check,  and work history check before you can start working.  I'm not sure why it works this way, but it does.

    Full time roles:
    At the very least you will need to pass a background check before receiving an offer.   The company might do employment, drug, or education checks, but it all really all depends on their size and their hiring practices.  I believe all companies do a background check.   



     
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • MrsWilliamsMrsWilliams Junior Member Member Posts: 192 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited August 2019
    UnixGuy said:
    I'm a bit confused. So the companies check employment history AFTER the offer has been made? I've always had companies check my employment records/policy check/education check BEFORE making an offer - it's a formality usually.


    For the recruiting companies:  (contracts)
    *You get an offer first, and then you do the paper work*.  You will need to fill out the application, background check,  and work history check before you can start working.  I'm not sure why it works this way, but it does. :o

    Full time roles:
    At the very least you will need to *pass a background check before receiving an offer*.    The company might do employment, drug, or education checks, but it all really all depends on their size and their hiring practices.  I believe all companies do a background check.   



     


    *Debatable and I don't agree*

    I just don't have the energy right now.... 

    I might come back here later  :#

    I don't think it's a by the book one size fits all to either approach based on your definition or explanation of background check for contracting or full time roles. 
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