Video | JDMurray's career advice to live by - Cyber Career Forum

Infosec_SamInfosec_Sam Security+, CCENT, ITIL Foundation, A+Madison, WIAdmin Posts: 511 Admin
edited December 2019 in Educational Resources
Do you have a piece of career advice that you live by? Which one piece of advice stuck with you throughout your career?



In this week's episode, TechExams moderator JDMurray sets out to answer that question. He talks about the advice he received from his father early on in his career, and about how it's important to never stop learning. Stagnating in your career only postpones your long-term goals. If you like the video, be sure to check out the rest of the playlist, and be on the lookout for more guests coming soon!


If you have a question you'd like answered in a future episode, comment below and I'll be sure to feature it at a later date!
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Comments

  • LonerVampLonerVamp OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, AWS SA-A, AWS Security, Sec+, Linux+, CCNA Cyber Ops, CCSK Member Posts: 515 ■■■■■■■■□□
    That is some seriously wise advice from your father.

    Security Engineer/Analyst/Geek, Red & Blue Teams
    OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, AWS SA-A, AWS Security, Sec+, Linux+, CCNA Cyber Ops, CCSK
    2020 goals: AWS Security Specialty, maybe AWAE or SLAE, CISSP-ISSAP?
  • Johnhe0414Johnhe0414 A+, Network+, Security+, Project+ USA, CARegistered Users Posts: 158 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Glad to match an avatar to a face :smile:@JDMurray - Good advice
    Current:  A+ | Network+ | Project+ |Security+
    Working on: Cysa+
  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 648 ■■■■■□□□□□
    That's excellent advice. We all should always be preparing for next job, whether a promotion or moving on to another company.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,745 Admin
    Hey, you can see my face on my LinkedIn page too! :)
  • MrsWilliamsMrsWilliams Junior Member Member Posts: 192 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I agree with this video more than the last one I just watched LOL

    @JDMurray

    Do you agree with the once you've learned everything quit logic?

    I think that some jobs are very repetitive. It's the come to work and do the same thing everyday, for days, weeks, and years on end. That is when complacency sets in. That is also why some people stay at jobs for years because they know it inside and out. 

    The learn everything point is interesting. Especially from a tiered approach. When you have a Tier 1 - X. You are only doing your job responsibilities outlined in your specific Tier. So, you don't really have the ability to go and be high speed. Not everyone wants to stop what they are doing to do unnecessary training either. Most people who have a semi-unpredictable work load aren't going to invest the time to train, especially if they don't have to. Sometimes people can get in the way more than help, as in slow you down.


  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,745 Admin
    @JDMurray

    Do you agree with the once you've learned everything quit logic?

    This bit of advice is much more valid for younger people that are still exploring possible career paths and do not have a family and mortgage to support. People who are more creative and not so sure of their ultimate career direction would benefit from changing jobs to learn first-hand what's possible for themselves. The people whose personality is more tuned to staying with one employer for 30+ years and then retiring at 55 would never consider this advice as practical for themselves to follow. 
  • LonerVampLonerVamp OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, AWS SA-A, AWS Security, Sec+, Linux+, CCNA Cyber Ops, CCSK Member Posts: 515 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Do you agree with the once you've learned everything quit logic?
    I think one nuance of this is about making sure you're challenged. Some people get into a job role, even one that is open-ended like a general network or systems administrator. You could literally do new things every 6 months. But, some people get mired in the things they do, and their time is completely taken up by those things, unable to shake them to do new things.

    Some jobs just aren't that broad. You could do things for 3 years, and by that time you've maybe seen and done everything (within reason) that company will give you for experience, exposure, and new things. It might be time to move on and grow again.

    I think the point is about growth and challenge and doing new things more than a statement about the job position itself.

    It's definitely not for everyone, and that's not a diss on them. Some people get comfortable, some people have a great life doing the same job and doing it well. Kudos to them.

    Security Engineer/Analyst/Geek, Red & Blue Teams
    OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, AWS SA-A, AWS Security, Sec+, Linux+, CCNA Cyber Ops, CCSK
    2020 goals: AWS Security Specialty, maybe AWAE or SLAE, CISSP-ISSAP?
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,167 Mod
    I think another I see is that the more experience you have, the harder it is to find new things/challenges in jobs. So you may want to stick it out longer in a job and use it to make connection and perhaps get exposure to other business units rather than learning new things
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • MrsWilliamsMrsWilliams Junior Member Member Posts: 192 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited December 2019
    LonerVamp said:
    Do you agree with the once you've learned everything quit logic?
    I think one nuance of this is about making sure you're challenged. Some people get into a job role, even one that is open-ended like a general network or systems administrator. You could literally do new things every 6 months. But, some people get mired in the things they do, and their time is completely taken up by those things, unable to shake them to do new things.

    Some jobs just aren't that broad. You could do things for 3 years, and by that time you've maybe seen and done everything (within reason) that company will give you for experience, exposure, and new things. It might be time to move on and grow again.

    I think the point is about growth and challenge and doing new things more than a statement about the job position itself.

    It's definitely not for everyone, and that's not a diss on them. Some people get comfortable, some people have a great life doing the same job and doing it well. Kudos to them.
    See, here is the double edged sword.

    I am sure (only because I remember reading them), it's a post or two about people who stay at Help Desk/Desktop Support for years. 

    You could erase Help Desk/Desktop Support and put in Sys Admin, IA, Engineer X, etc. So, people have used roles and time in job to positively or negatively impact the narrative. . 

    I agree with JD BUT, how realistic is someone retiring at 55 or 65 in the Information Technology Field. It's a post about people entering IT at 40, not the norm I know. So...let me break it down.

    1. In the field, people work for Contractors/Sub- Contractors that really aren't about that stay here until you retire life. Just because they match 0-5% of your IRA contributions means little (I'll break it down in a second). Everyone that's been in IT for a while, especially in a big city has worked as a Contractor, who isn't necessarily established for retirement benefits.

    2. Once you jump ship, your time in grade/time in service starts over. Unless you work for the Gov, your X years of service goes back to 0. The old military retirement, you could have retired in 20 years. It's people who retired at E-5/SGT. Nowadays, you would have been kicked out by then. Point being, the old military retirement system enabled you to "retire" in 20 years. It was almost guaranteed you could retire. If you enter at 18, at 38/39 you could retire, collect disability (if applicable), and get another job and have 3-4 checks coming in a month. Most of us aren't in the military and the military retirement is different to say the least now.

    From a civilian side of the house you have IRA contributions. The upside, you can move IRA contributions around. That is the upside. That is the only way you can use the word retirement, unless you are a heck of a saver. Most of us aren't in the military and this isn't a military based forum. Very few posts regarding MOS, TSP Contributions and my next duty station responsibilities here...

    3. How many people max out IRA contributions? Putting in $100 every two weeks for 30 years...is NOT retirement income (you do the math). Yea, you can go retire in Thailand, Philippines, Laos, Indonesia, Dominican Republic, etc but you aren't retiring off of that little money that most people put into IRA contributions in America. You know why? Because like he said..people have a family and mortgage to support. To include the car payment, credit card payment, gas, water, electric, cellular phone, cable, etc. So (some) people are living for today. People aren't saying let me stay in this cheap apartment  and commute to work on the bus so I can max out my IRA contributions. Realistically, people aren't, can't, and won't retire in 30 years (in America). If retirement is getting social security and $1,200 a month and living in a 1 bedroom shack the rest of your life working part time..yeah sure. You retired. Kudos to you!

    4. I can't name that many people that have stayed at a single role within a single company in the Information Technology Field 20 years, not to mention 10. It's not realistic. Since 10-20 years ins't the norm, the only way to realistically plan for retirement is through investment contributions or savings. We aren't on a government/USA Jobs forum here LOL. It is numerous posts of people saying they have to save for this cert or this training. People can't afford this or that. Those are posts of people I would ass-u-me aren't in the position to plan for and even ready to retire. Living pay check to pay check, unless you are maxing out your IRA contributions isn't setting you up to retire in even 70 years. 

    I personally like growth and challenge and I am not against people moving on or moving up for more money. Moving on for experience and less money .....not my thing.


  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, CSM, MS Access 2016, 2019 Member Posts: 2,562 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Nicely done JD.  
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,745 Admin
    MrsWilliams said:
    I agree with JD BUT, how realistic is someone retiring at 55 or 65 in the Information Technology Field. It's a post about people entering IT at 40, not the norm I know.

    As a hiring manager myself, I look at all the skills a person has that can be used to solve problems that my organization has. Someone who is 40+ who is trying to enter IT will likely have other skills that I consider valuable (e.g., writing, managing people or projects, programming, negotiation, physical security, etc.). What skills I value is highly dependant on the context of the employment situation. Also, the age of a candidate is never a factor to me but could be an issue in some employment situations elsewhere despite the candidate's knowledge and skills.
  • Neil86Neil86 Member Member Posts: 155 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Great video and advice. Love the hammer & nail reference. Thanks @JDMurray and @Infosec_Sam
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