What is the largest increase you have received with the same employer?

E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,876 ■■■■■■■■■□
edited December 2020 in IT Jobs / Degrees
I know the biggest pay bumps come from changing employers so wondering what others have experienced switching jobs within the same company. Yesterday I had a discussion with a former manager about an opportunity and that evening I received an offer for a 22% increase. That is the largest I have ever been offered when moving to a new role at the same company.
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Comments

  • scott28ttscott28tt Member Posts: 682 ■■■■■□□□□□
    edited December 2020
    I’ve had one of about 20% plus another of about 15%

    The biggest % I ever had was a counteroffer after being offered a job externally, that was an instant 40% increase on my base salary
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  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Member Posts: 1,179 ■■■■■■■■□□
    scott28tt said:
    I’ve had one of about 20% plus another of about 15%

    The biggest % I ever had was a counteroffer after being offered a job externally, that was an instant 40% increase on my base salary

    That's what happened to me. Boss offered me a 12% increase to stick around after I received another offer. Sometimes it takes a job offer to make your current boss realize that he needs you around.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,172 Admin
    I once received a 12.5% in-place increase because my employer was re-tooling its salary levels to be more competitive in its industry. I don't remember if I was more shocked at being given more money for doing no extra work or that I was being so underpaid for years!
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,028 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited December 2020
    Looking back at my W2 tax forms, My total salary compensation jumped 23% from 2017 to 2018 after taking a promotion.  It was a 15% increase in base salary, and 23% we the increase bonus level was factored in. 
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,876 ■■■■■■■■■□
    @scott28tt and @tedjames - How much longer did you remain with those employers after accepting the counteroffer? I ask because my current manager once said he does not give counteroffers because he figures people will leave at some point anyways if they were already prepared to accept another offer. I am curious to hear your motivation for staying at a place that decided not to bump up your pay until they saw another employer showing interest. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, and more.

    2021 goals: AZ-303, AZ-304, maybe TOGAF and more ISACA

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
  • jibtechjibtech Member Posts: 415 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Same company, but changed roles. Netted 24.6% increase.

  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,915 Mod
    edited December 2020
    My best internal moves have been role changes. Anywhere between 15-25% bump. My best external bump was 40%. 
  • QordQord Senior Member Member Posts: 632 ■■■■□□□□□□
    20%, from 40k to 48k. Unexpected and out of the blue, and definitely appreciated. I was told it was get me closer to on-par with my coworkers. 
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014, CSM Member Posts: 2,646 ■■■■■■■■■□
  • stryder144stryder144 Senior Member Member Posts: 1,684 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I think I have had a 20% increase internal and a 100%+ increase moving to another company.
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  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Member Posts: 1,179 ■■■■■■■■□□
    @scott28tt and @tedjames - How much longer did you remain with those employers after accepting the counteroffer? I ask because my current manager once said he does not give counteroffers because he figures people will leave at some point anyways if they were already prepared to accept another offer. I am curious to hear your motivation for staying at a place that decided not to bump up your pay until they saw another employer showing interest. 
    When I received that offer, I checked the Texas state salaries database (Texas state government salaries are published) to see what others in my prospective new agency were making, and I also checked what others in the state in similar roles were making. When I told my boss about the offer, I also showed him where I was in relation to my peers around the state. That's when he realized that I was being underpaid and went to HR to request a salary adjustment for me. He was able to meet the other agency's offer. I stayed another couple of months. However, a job with a boss I really wanted to work for at another agency opened, and I applied. This was something I was waiting for over the better part of a year. I applied, interviewed, and got the job. I gave my then current boss three weeks notice and told him that I was not using his salary adjustment to pivot into an even higher salary. I told him that I was already planning to leave because I felt I was in a dead end and saw this new opportunity as a way to grow in my career. I told him that I enjoyed working for him and that it was nothing personal. He said that he should've done something far sooner than he did. I should've said something to him much earlier, too.

    TL/DR: My motivation for staying was essentially that this was my first job in security (as a technical writer and program manager, not a security analyst), and I needed to build myself up into the type of candidate that other agencies wanted for security analysts. As soon as I felt I was ready, I started applying. It just took some time. Meanwhile, my job had become dead end, but I had to stick it out. My patience paid off.

  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Mod Posts: 2,829 Mod
    Never got crap moving around with the same employer. As a matter of fact, at a couple of them I saw in the HR guidelines they actually had a cap at 10% for any move! External has always yielded tremendous jumps. My move in April netted me a mind-boggling 58% increase on an already high salary. And oh, that wasn't even including RSUs  :o
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  • balancebalance Member Posts: 217 ■■■■□□□□□□
    The largest I have ever gotten from a single employer was $3,500.00 extra annual and a 10K bonus ( to offset taxes for the company paying for my move).  If I don't jump to a different employer every 18-24 months  I would never make any decent money.  I really don't like jumping around to be hoents but what can do you do.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,267 Mod
    Managed to get 50% increase when I changed jobs in June. I think it's my biggest jump.

    I always tried to change roles internally but was never successful. I don't think I'm patient enough so I move on when things don't workout the way I want them to.

    This time I'm planning to stay longer because I want my next jump to be much better in terms of responsibilities and compensation.
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  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,876 ■■■■■■■■■□
    @JoJoCal19 - 58% is rather impressive

    @stryder144 - 100% increase!?!?! Either you were extremely underpaid or wow...just wow. Please teach me lol

    @balance - Is it safe to assume that was a one time bonus? I wonder what was the % increase of the additional $3,500 annually. If you were making $10,000 annually then that's a 35% increase, but if you were making $100,000 then its only 3.5%. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, and more.

    2021 goals: AZ-303, AZ-304, maybe TOGAF and more ISACA

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
  • balancebalance Member Posts: 217 ■■■■□□□□□□
    @JoJoCal19 - 58% is rather impressive

    @stryder144 - 100% increase!?!?! Either you were extremely underpaid or wow...just wow. Please teach me lol

    @balance - Is it safe to assume that was a one time bonus? I wonder what was the % increase of the additional $3,500 annually. If you were making $10,000 annually then that's a 35% increase, but if you were making $100,000 then its only 3.5%. 
    I was making over 100K  so it was a small increase. The bonus was a one time bonus to cover taxes  which the company was due to pay for for the beginning of my employment. 
  • scott28ttscott28tt Member Posts: 682 ■■■■■□□□□□
    edited December 2020
    @scott28tt and @tedjames - How much longer did you remain with those employers after accepting the counteroffer? I ask because my current manager once said he does not give counteroffers because he figures people will leave at some point anyways if they were already prepared to accept another offer. I am curious to hear your motivation for staying at a place that decided not to bump up your pay until they saw another employer showing interest. 
    I was there for another 12 months and was given the extra responsibilities I had been seeking at the time. But, I had an awful line manager (it was his manager who had made me the offer to stay) so ended up in a “him or me” situation and was made an offer by a competitor for pretty much the same money but a role with more potential.
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  • egrizzlyegrizzly B.Sc (Info. Systems), CISSP, CCNA, CCNP, Security+ Member Posts: 452 ■■■■□□□□□□
    @E Double U

    The vast majority of HR departments at mid-sized to large-sized enterprises have specified ranges for each job role.  They are also locked in by policy at how much increase they can give employees at year end.  Not all of them have an _employee retention pay policy_ which allows them to give you a bump when you get an offer from a competitor.

    Anyways...how do you get higher pay from the same employer?  Well, if you happen to be a Tier 1 who came in at the lower end of the range (maybe weak negotiation) and you wanted to take a different job title which is also Tier 1, you can take that opportunity to negotiate strong and then be at the higher end of that Tier 1 range.  Same if you're moving up from Tier 1 to Tier 2.  How do you know which jobs are which Tier?  You have to call HR and have them explain it to you.  Some HR offices even have spreadsheets that they send out to employees which explain which roles are in which tiers and their salary ranges.

    Hope it helps somewhat
    B.Sc (Info. Systems), CISSP, CCNA, CCNP, Security+
  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,876 ■■■■■■■■■□
    @egrizzly - Well, that didn't help me because I wasn't looking for advice lol. I was just curious about others situations.

    I employer has a labor agreement that shows are pay scales readily available on our intranet. With a few extra clicks on the org chart and looking at job descriptions you can see where everyone lands on that scale. I like the transparency. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, and more.

    2021 goals: AZ-303, AZ-304, maybe TOGAF and more ISACA

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
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