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Which order. How to tackle.

JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
Ok, i will be working 3rd shift weekends at a data center. I have worked over 5 years in the field and my BIS in IT/CIS held my A+ and Net+ and my AWS cert Prac.
So i will have a lot of time left to study.
The certs I want to get are:
Linux essentials
Lpic-1
Linux+ 
Linux foundation.
Server+
Itil 4 Foundations. 
Cloud+
Cloud Essentials
Azure Fundamentals
Aws 2nd level
Google cloud 1/2
CCNA 
Juniper Jnca?
Project+

A+/Net+ again.
Possible Sec+

How many do you think is possible in a year? How to approach this? 



Comments

  • Options
    trojintrojin Member Posts: 275 ■■■■□□□□□□
    It's possible as some of the certs are overlapping. Just - do you really need all of them? 
    I'm just doing my job, nothing personal, sorry

    xx+ certs...and I'm not counting anymore


  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    trojin said:
    It's possible as some of the certs are overlapping. Just - do you really need all of them? 
    Not really just trying to get some certs in downtime Not sure what is the best options. A lot of Linux does overlap but will possibly move me to linux support/server with my cloud background doing sd/prod support it can with server+ plus the cloud stuffs move me into a cloud role or atleast a sys admin. The project can help me as i did work on helping the app teams with schedules and testing while moving to the cloud/rewritting. Ititl Helps with this so does agile and the black belt along with pmp which i might look at. 

    The network stuff is just for staying in the data center possibly help with design and connections. The A+ and Net+ is going back over the cabeling stuffs that updated and since i work in a dc running cables and stuff. 

    Sec+ is just to learn to be more security minded and looks good with all the hacking going on. 

    So in a way they all serve a purpose. More cloud/server exp and Linux to move into the cloud space and more background to back up my limited exp. working in the actually cloud vs supporting the engineers and app teams. And more project based focused to help with migrations and other projects within the cloud/sys admin space. And the data center side to move up in that compacity. 
  • Options
    E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,229 ■■■■■■■■■■
    edited February 2022
    14 certifications in one year plus renewing two and one maybe...I guess anything is possible, but not sure I see the point of them all. Nevertheless, my approach would be to begin with whatever brings immediate ROI so whatever can help in in the current role or help me with another role being targeted. That combined with whatever I find the most interesting. 

    Question: Will your employer pay for all of this?
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Options
    JDMurrayJDMurray Admin Posts: 13,030 Admin
    Jwvantas said:
    Ok, i will be working 3rd shift weekends at a data center.
    You really have a lot of time on your shift to do all this studying for certs? What is it you were hired to actually do?


  • Options
    E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,229 ■■■■■■■■■■
    JDMurray said:
    Jwvantas said:
    Ok, i will be working 3rd shift weekends at a data center.
    You really have a lot of time on your shift to do all this studying for certs? What is it you were hired to actually do?


    Clearly this individual has decided to simply give up sleep and a life in general. Either that or...


    Chair Goes Round GIF - The Simpsons Homer Simpson Chair Goes Round -  Discover amp Share GIFs
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Options
    Info_Sec_WannabeInfo_Sec_Wannabe Member Posts: 428 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A few points:
    1. Where do you want or see yourself focusing on long term? Once you know, what you can do is break that down from high level to lower level certs.
    2. Have you started on your 3rd shift? Are you sure your sleep patterns won't be affected? When I had my first born, I recall thinking to myself that I will have more study time while watching the baby. That was in 2017 and til now, I'm still wondering when to really prepare for OSCP.
    3. If you can do away with the overlapping certs, that will be great. I guess you can look at job sites to help you trim that down, but remember point 1 above.
    4. You will need rest, otherwise, you'll burn yourself out. 
    5. Do you have an idea how much it costs to maintain those? On top of the exam fee?
    X year plan: (20XX) OSCP [ ], CCSP [ ]
  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    14 certifications in one year plus renewing two and one maybe...I guess anything is possible, but not sure I see the point of them all. Nevertheless, my approach would be to begin with whatever brings immediate ROI so whatever can help in in the current role or help me with another role being targeted. That combined with whatever I find the most interesting. 

    Question: Will your employer pay for all of this?They say they will pay for certs 
  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    JDMurray said:
    Jwvantas said:
    Ok, i will be working 3rd shift weekends at a data center.
    You really have a lot of time on your shift to do all this studying for certs? What is it you were hired to actually do?


    I was posting to see what is possible. Not that I plan on doing all. But working at a small data enter 3rd shift weekend. Which I was told nothing really happens and will have a lot of downtime. Plus I work nearly 3 12s so I will have some daytime studying.
  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    A few points:
    1. Where do you want or see yourself focusing on long term? Once you know, what you can do is break that down from high level to lower level certs.
    2. Have you started on your 3rd shift? Are you sure your sleep patterns won't be affected? When I had my first born, I recall thinking to myself that I will have more study time while watching the baby. That was in 2017 and til now, I'm still wondering when to really prepare for OSCP.
    3. If you can do away with the overlapping certs, that will be great. I guess you can look at job sites to help you trim that down, but remember point 1 above.
    4. You will need rest, otherwise, you'll burn yourself out. 
    5. Do you have an idea how much it costs to maintain those? On top of the exam fee?
    I worked 3rd for 4 years. I am fine sleeping all day as I'm a night person by nature. No kids, no wife. 

    I just laid out what I thought would be useful to get. I have a sd/vauge cloud prod support history. Know a bit about servers but nothing to really back it up. 
  • Options
    JoveJove Member Posts: 26 ■■■□□□□□□□
    edited February 2022
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Jove said:
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

    So focus only one 1 cloud provider and not the others? I do a bit of Linux but nothing serious, so I want to get the essentials to make sure I know the basics also would the Linux plus or lpic lead me into Red Hat? What about the Linux foundation? 

    My cloud background was Foundry ran on Ubuntu server and Azure.  I never used AWS.

    Also with my migration background would business like Agile or ITIL make sense. Not to mention a project cert for migrating users to the cloud?

    Or would that be too much?
  • Options
    ABN_SigoABN_Sigo Member Posts: 5 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Get one cert from each domain to learn the various concepts. One Linux should be enough to move on to Red Hat for example or another distro. 
    Start with one cloud cert and get better and then read the books for the others. All cloud technology services are kinda similar with varying nomenclature and some specific technology for each. 
    Then move on to security with Sec+, CCSK perhaps and eventually SSCP or CISSP when ready. 
    Take it slow and navigate life as it happens.  
  • Options
    E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,229 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Jwvantas said:
    Jove said:
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

    So focus only one 1 cloud provider and not the others? I do a bit of Linux but nothing serious, so I want to get the essentials to make sure I know the basics also would the Linux plus or lpic lead me into Red Hat? What about the Linux foundation? 

    My cloud background was Foundry ran on Ubuntu server and Azure.  I never used AWS.

    Also with my migration background would business like Agile or ITIL make sense. Not to mention a project cert for migrating users to the cloud?

    Or would that be too much?
    Disclaimer: I prefer vendor-agnostic certifications so keep that in mind when reading my response.

    I do not see why anyone would study for multiple cloud vendor certs outside of just a pure love for it. Or if you work in a multi-cloud environment which offers the opportunity to get certified in several. I went the CCSP route because I worked in a multi-cloud environment (AWS, Azure) and wanted to learn more about cloud security. I only took Azure certifications because it was required and I had hands-on access to the environment. You mentioned having Azure as a part of your cloud background and never used AWS so the most logical/practical direction should be obvious. But I did not catch if you are trying to get these certs to move up within your current employer (which means you should get certified in whichever platform they use) or have your eyes on a role with another employer (which means you should focus on whichever platform they use). 

    No one else can say what is too much for you. It depends on what your goals are. Every certification you have mentioned does serve a purpose, but it does not seem the purpose for you is clear. What exactly do you currently do in the data center? For example you mention CCNA, but do you work with Cisco routers/switches? Just because Cisco equipment is within the data center does not mean that you need to get certified in it. 

    Good luck with whichever direction you go in.

    Note: I see that you quoted me above, but you did not write anything. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Jwvantas said:
    Jove said:
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

    So focus only one 1 cloud provider and not the others? I do a bit of Linux but nothing serious, so I want to get the essentials to make sure I know the basics also would the Linux plus or lpic lead me into Red Hat? What about the Linux foundation? 

    My cloud background was Foundry ran on Ubuntu server and Azure.  I never used AWS.

    Also with my migration background would business like Agile or ITIL make sense. Not to mention a project cert for migrating users to the cloud?

    Or would that be too much?
    Disclaimer: I prefer vendor-agnostic certifications so keep that in mind when reading my response.

    I do not see why anyone would study for multiple cloud vendor certs outside of just a pure love for it. Or if you work in a multi-cloud environment which offers the opportunity to get certified in several. I went the CCSP route because I worked in a multi-cloud environment (AWS, Azure) and wanted to learn more about cloud security. I only took Azure certifications because it was required and I had hands-on access to the environment. You mentioned having Azure as a part of your cloud background and never used AWS so the most logical/practical direction should be obvious. But I did not catch if you are trying to get these certs to move up within your current employer (which means you should get certified in whichever platform they use) or have your eyes on a role with another employer (which means you should focus on whichever platform they use). 

    No one else can say what is too much for you. It depends on what your goals are. Every certification you have mentioned does serve a purpose, but it does not seem the purpose for you is clear. What exactly do you currently do in the data center? For example you mention CCNA, but do you work with Cisco routers/switches? Just because Cisco equipment is within the data center does not mean that you need to get certified in it. 

    Good luck with whichever direction you go in.

    Note: I see that you quoted me above, but you did not write anything. 
    Yes to move up. We used Azure but only the engineers (2nd level ) had access to it. I tried the Azure fund and failed by less than 100 points 2x. Took me 2x to get Aws Cloud Prac. I was just Azured out and wanted to get a cloud offering was trying to get all 3 to increase job prospects.. This job uses both Azure and AWS, not sure about Google. I have played around in their open env but didn't really know much when I was doing so as that is the only hands on i had for it. 

    I am currently an OPS TECH 1. Running cable and racking servers/switches/firewalls doing facility stuff a bit. Was going to do A+ to get more familiar with the stuff I'm doing now to be a better tech and relearn the old stuff and the new stuff. The net plus also to relearn old and learn new to be a better tech.

    Sys admin/cloud is my passion. SO the Linux stuffs to prove my exp without having exp on resume. All my exp is just running vm and such. Server + for no running platforms. And the cloud stuffs for cloud support. 

    I always like the business side of monitoring/ setting up playbooks and incident mgmt some that i have a bit of exp doing but not that exact title. Also migration to cloud project coordination support working with app teams to smote over any issue and setup and track meetings for issues with cloud mgmt. No major pm guy but working with them/under them. Project + and there is a pmp light cert which i forget, OR ITIL/Agile.

    Security speaks for itself in this day and age everyone should know how to secure what they are doing. 
  • Options
    thomas_thomas_ Member Posts: 1,012 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I would look at the job postings you’re interested in and see what they’re looking for.
  • Options
    E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,229 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Jwvantas said:
    Jwvantas said:
    Jove said:
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

    So focus only one 1 cloud provider and not the others? I do a bit of Linux but nothing serious, so I want to get the essentials to make sure I know the basics also would the Linux plus or lpic lead me into Red Hat? What about the Linux foundation? 

    My cloud background was Foundry ran on Ubuntu server and Azure.  I never used AWS.

    Also with my migration background would business like Agile or ITIL make sense. Not to mention a project cert for migrating users to the cloud?

    Or would that be too much?
    Disclaimer: I prefer vendor-agnostic certifications so keep that in mind when reading my response.

    I do not see why anyone would study for multiple cloud vendor certs outside of just a pure love for it. Or if you work in a multi-cloud environment which offers the opportunity to get certified in several. I went the CCSP route because I worked in a multi-cloud environment (AWS, Azure) and wanted to learn more about cloud security. I only took Azure certifications because it was required and I had hands-on access to the environment. You mentioned having Azure as a part of your cloud background and never used AWS so the most logical/practical direction should be obvious. But I did not catch if you are trying to get these certs to move up within your current employer (which means you should get certified in whichever platform they use) or have your eyes on a role with another employer (which means you should focus on whichever platform they use). 

    No one else can say what is too much for you. It depends on what your goals are. Every certification you have mentioned does serve a purpose, but it does not seem the purpose for you is clear. What exactly do you currently do in the data center? For example you mention CCNA, but do you work with Cisco routers/switches? Just because Cisco equipment is within the data center does not mean that you need to get certified in it. 

    Good luck with whichever direction you go in.

    Note: I see that you quoted me above, but you did not write anything. 
    Yes to move up. We used Azure but only the engineers (2nd level ) had access to it. I tried the Azure fund and failed by less than 100 points 2x. Took me 2x to get Aws Cloud Prac. I was just Azured out and wanted to get a cloud offering was trying to get all 3 to increase job prospects.. This job uses both Azure and AWS, not sure about Google. I have played around in their open env but didn't really know much when I was doing so as that is the only hands on i had for it. 

    I am currently an OPS TECH 1. Running cable and racking servers/switches/firewalls doing facility stuff a bit. Was going to do A+ to get more familiar with the stuff I'm doing now to be a better tech and relearn the old stuff and the new stuff. The net plus also to relearn old and learn new to be a better tech.

    Sys admin/cloud is my passion. SO the Linux stuffs to prove my exp without having exp on resume. All my exp is just running vm and such. Server + for no running platforms. And the cloud stuffs for cloud support. 

    I always like the business side of monitoring/ setting up playbooks and incident mgmt some that i have a bit of exp doing but not that exact title. Also migration to cloud project coordination support working with app teams to smote over any issue and setup and track meetings for issues with cloud mgmt. No major pm guy but working with them/under them. Project + and there is a pmp light cert which i forget, OR ITIL/Agile.

    Security speaks for itself in this day and age everyone should know how to secure what they are doing. 
    Is it possible for those 2nd level engineers to get you access to an Azure and/or AWS sandbox environments for practice? I found that helpful when I was preparing for Azure credentials. I really do not see the point of attempting to learn all three cloud platforms. 

    I do not see the point of relearning A+ and Network+ material. After completing a certification, use the job as continued learning on that topic and just move on to the next certification. But I only maintain certifications that require annual maintenance fees and education credits instead of retaking exams. Unless you are required to retake the exam or just love doing so. 

    Of course I do not know you so forgive this assessment/judgement - the only way I could see you completing all those exams within one year is if you are simply studying d*mps of the real exams. Your aim of what appears to be at least one exam per month makes me question if you are actually trying to learn the material or just pass exams. If you had many years of experience across all of the different areas your list covers (cloud, networking, linux, security, infrastructure, project mgmt, IT service delivery) then the possibility of completing all of those within a year becomes stronger because only a review would be needed. Based on the work experience you have described I don't really see this happening honestly. You still have Azure Fundamentals in your list and you already failed it twice. You want another AWS cred, but it took you two attempts to pass the most basic one. How did you prepare and for how long? Take that into consideration when planning how much time you will spend on each cert.

    Given the amount of downtime you will have, I recommend just asking people in the positions you are interested in if you could volunteer to tag along to get more hands-on experience. That way you could have more focus on a credential that aligns with whatever you are learning at work. 

    Just my $0.02
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Options
    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Jwvantas said:
    Jwvantas said:
    Jove said:
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

    So focus only one 1 cloud provider and not the others? I do a bit of Linux but nothing serious, so I want to get the essentials to make sure I know the basics also would the Linux plus or lpic lead me into Red Hat? What about the Linux foundation? 

    My cloud background was Foundry ran on Ubuntu server and Azure.  I never used AWS.

    Also with my migration background would business like Agile or ITIL make sense. Not to mention a project cert for migrating users to the cloud?

    Or would that be too much?
    Disclaimer: I prefer vendor-agnostic certifications so keep that in mind when reading my response.

    I do not see why anyone would study for multiple cloud vendor certs outside of just a pure love for it. Or if you work in a multi-cloud environment which offers the opportunity to get certified in several. I went the CCSP route because I worked in a multi-cloud environment (AWS, Azure) and wanted to learn more about cloud security. I only took Azure certifications because it was required and I had hands-on access to the environment. You mentioned having Azure as a part of your cloud background and never used AWS so the most logical/practical direction should be obvious. But I did not catch if you are trying to get these certs to move up within your current employer (which means you should get certified in whichever platform they use) or have your eyes on a role with another employer (which means you should focus on whichever platform they use). 

    No one else can say what is too much for you. It depends on what your goals are. Every certification you have mentioned does serve a purpose, but it does not seem the purpose for you is clear. What exactly do you currently do in the data center? For example you mention CCNA, but do you work with Cisco routers/switches? Just because Cisco equipment is within the data center does not mean that you need to get certified in it. 

    Good luck with whichever direction you go in.

    Note: I see that you quoted me above, but you did not write anything. 
    Yes to move up. We used Azure but only the engineers (2nd level ) had access to it. I tried the Azure fund and failed by less than 100 points 2x. Took me 2x to get Aws Cloud Prac. I was just Azured out and wanted to get a cloud offering was trying to get all 3 to increase job prospects.. This job uses both Azure and AWS, not sure about Google. I have played around in their open env but didn't really know much when I was doing so as that is the only hands on i had for it. 

    I am currently an OPS TECH 1. Running cable and racking servers/switches/firewalls doing facility stuff a bit. Was going to do A+ to get more familiar with the stuff I'm doing now to be a better tech and relearn the old stuff and the new stuff. The net plus also to relearn old and learn new to be a better tech.

    Sys admin/cloud is my passion. SO the Linux stuffs to prove my exp without having exp on resume. All my exp is just running vm and such. Server + for no running platforms. And the cloud stuffs for cloud support. 

    I always like the business side of monitoring/ setting up playbooks and incident mgmt some that i have a bit of exp doing but not that exact title. Also migration to cloud project coordination support working with app teams to smote over any issue and setup and track meetings for issues with cloud mgmt. No major pm guy but working with them/under them. Project + and there is a pmp light cert which i forget, OR ITIL/Agile.

    Security speaks for itself in this day and age everyone should know how to secure what they are doing. 
    Is it possible for those 2nd level engineers to get you access to an Azure and/or AWS sandbox environments for practice? I found that helpful when I was preparing for Azure credentials. I really do not see the point of attempting to learn all three cloud platforms. 

    I do not see the point of relearning A+ and Network+ material. After completing a certification, use the job as continued learning on that topic and just move on to the next certification. But I only maintain certifications that require annual maintenance fees and education credits instead of retaking exams. Unless you are required to retake the exam or just love doing so. 

    Of course I do not know you so forgive this assessment/judgement - the only way I could see you completing all those exams within one year is if you are simply studying d*mps of the real exams. Your aim of what appears to be at least one exam per month makes me question if you are actually trying to learn the material or just pass exams. If you had many years of experience across all of the different areas your list covers (cloud, networking, linux, security, infrastructure, project mgmt, IT service delivery) then the possibility of completing all of those within a year becomes stronger because only a review would be needed. Based on the work experience you have described I don't really see this happening honestly. You still have Azure Fundamentals in your list and you already failed it twice. You want another AWS cred, but it took you two attempts to pass the most basic one. How did you prepare and for how long? Take that into consideration when planning how much time you will spend on each cert.

    Given the amount of downtime you will have, I recommend just asking people in the positions you are interested in if you could volunteer to tag along to get more hands-on experience. That way you could have more focus on a credential that aligns with whatever you are learning at work. 

    Just my $0.02
    That is my full wishlist IF I could. Don't expect to do them all just an idea of which I should do overall and what is the best option bang for my buck to say. And which to skip.
  • Options
    E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,229 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Jwvantas said:
    Jwvantas said:
    Jwvantas said:
    Jove said:
    Since you are going to be part of a data center, I would recommend taking the following certifications that will most likely get you a great return of investment (higher salary)

    You should take:
    AWS Solution Architect Associate
    AWS Security
    AWS Dev Ops
    CCSK
    Red Hat System Administrator
    Security+
    CISSP

    So focus only one 1 cloud provider and not the others? I do a bit of Linux but nothing serious, so I want to get the essentials to make sure I know the basics also would the Linux plus or lpic lead me into Red Hat? What about the Linux foundation? 

    My cloud background was Foundry ran on Ubuntu server and Azure.  I never used AWS.

    Also with my migration background would business like Agile or ITIL make sense. Not to mention a project cert for migrating users to the cloud?

    Or would that be too much?
    Disclaimer: I prefer vendor-agnostic certifications so keep that in mind when reading my response.

    I do not see why anyone would study for multiple cloud vendor certs outside of just a pure love for it. Or if you work in a multi-cloud environment which offers the opportunity to get certified in several. I went the CCSP route because I worked in a multi-cloud environment (AWS, Azure) and wanted to learn more about cloud security. I only took Azure certifications because it was required and I had hands-on access to the environment. You mentioned having Azure as a part of your cloud background and never used AWS so the most logical/practical direction should be obvious. But I did not catch if you are trying to get these certs to move up within your current employer (which means you should get certified in whichever platform they use) or have your eyes on a role with another employer (which means you should focus on whichever platform they use). 

    No one else can say what is too much for you. It depends on what your goals are. Every certification you have mentioned does serve a purpose, but it does not seem the purpose for you is clear. What exactly do you currently do in the data center? For example you mention CCNA, but do you work with Cisco routers/switches? Just because Cisco equipment is within the data center does not mean that you need to get certified in it. 

    Good luck with whichever direction you go in.

    Note: I see that you quoted me above, but you did not write anything. 
    Yes to move up. We used Azure but only the engineers (2nd level ) had access to it. I tried the Azure fund and failed by less than 100 points 2x. Took me 2x to get Aws Cloud Prac. I was just Azured out and wanted to get a cloud offering was trying to get all 3 to increase job prospects.. This job uses both Azure and AWS, not sure about Google. I have played around in their open env but didn't really know much when I was doing so as that is the only hands on i had for it. 

    I am currently an OPS TECH 1. Running cable and racking servers/switches/firewalls doing facility stuff a bit. Was going to do A+ to get more familiar with the stuff I'm doing now to be a better tech and relearn the old stuff and the new stuff. The net plus also to relearn old and learn new to be a better tech.

    Sys admin/cloud is my passion. SO the Linux stuffs to prove my exp without having exp on resume. All my exp is just running vm and such. Server + for no running platforms. And the cloud stuffs for cloud support. 

    I always like the business side of monitoring/ setting up playbooks and incident mgmt some that i have a bit of exp doing but not that exact title. Also migration to cloud project coordination support working with app teams to smote over any issue and setup and track meetings for issues with cloud mgmt. No major pm guy but working with them/under them. Project + and there is a pmp light cert which i forget, OR ITIL/Agile.

    Security speaks for itself in this day and age everyone should know how to secure what they are doing. 
    Is it possible for those 2nd level engineers to get you access to an Azure and/or AWS sandbox environments for practice? I found that helpful when I was preparing for Azure credentials. I really do not see the point of attempting to learn all three cloud platforms. 

    I do not see the point of relearning A+ and Network+ material. After completing a certification, use the job as continued learning on that topic and just move on to the next certification. But I only maintain certifications that require annual maintenance fees and education credits instead of retaking exams. Unless you are required to retake the exam or just love doing so. 

    Of course I do not know you so forgive this assessment/judgement - the only way I could see you completing all those exams within one year is if you are simply studying d*mps of the real exams. Your aim of what appears to be at least one exam per month makes me question if you are actually trying to learn the material or just pass exams. If you had many years of experience across all of the different areas your list covers (cloud, networking, linux, security, infrastructure, project mgmt, IT service delivery) then the possibility of completing all of those within a year becomes stronger because only a review would be needed. Based on the work experience you have described I don't really see this happening honestly. You still have Azure Fundamentals in your list and you already failed it twice. You want another AWS cred, but it took you two attempts to pass the most basic one. How did you prepare and for how long? Take that into consideration when planning how much time you will spend on each cert.

    Given the amount of downtime you will have, I recommend just asking people in the positions you are interested in if you could volunteer to tag along to get more hands-on experience. That way you could have more focus on a credential that aligns with whatever you are learning at work. 

    Just my $0.02
    That is my full wishlist IF I could. Don't expect to do them all just an idea of which I should do overall and what is the best option bang for my buck to say. And which to skip.
    Have you made a decision on what to focus on next? 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
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    JwvantasJwvantas Member Posts: 28 ■■■□□□□□□□
    edited February 2022
    There is a boson or something data enter power associates exam
     And server+ into Linux most likely. ITIL FOUNDATIONS 4 at some point. Then see 
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    kaijukaiju Member Posts: 453 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Also have a look at tryhackme.com or similar sites where you learn attack vectors. Having knowledge of how attacks can occur can assists with hardening systems/networks. Plus there is lots of hands-on practice and not just hours of mindless reading. Really inexpensive and you will learn Linux if that is something you desire.
    Work smarter NOT harder! Semper Gumby!
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