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MCSA?

saddlebagssaddlebags Member Posts: 20 ■□□□□□□□□□
Ive got the A+ but I dont think I can use that as an elective on its own can I?

If I was to do 5 out of:
290
291
293
294
297
298
would that give me the MCSA?

Or would it to be better to do the N+ and use that and the A+ as an elective? If I done that how many exams would I need for the MCSA?

Thanks :)

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    eurotrasheurotrash Member Posts: 817
    You need:

    290
    291
    270 or 210

    plus one elective.

    Of the ones you mentioned, you can do:

    none :D. (Except of course the N+)

    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcsa/windows2003/default.mspx
    witty comment
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    saddlebagssaddlebags Member Posts: 20 ■□□□□□□□□□
    So if I done the 290, 291, 270/210, I could do like the 089 for the MCSA?

    Sorry for all the questions but I just cant get my head round this.
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    eurotrasheurotrash Member Posts: 817
    Yes. Any one of those Elective exams.
    witty comment
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    Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    After MCSA, 293,294 and 297/298 would give you an MCSE, assuming you already took an elective that qualifies for MCSE. Many of the MCSA electives don't qualify for MCSE, A+/N+ being one of them.
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    saddlebagssaddlebags Member Posts: 20 ■□□□□□□□□□
    OK thanks. It makes sense now
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    bighornsheepbighornsheep Member Posts: 1,506
    the MCSA with messaging/security specialization is basically doing the specific elective right?

    anyone have any comments about the new generation of certifications? Will that render MCSA/MCSE useless once they become popular and available?
    Jack of all trades, master of none
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    SlowhandSlowhand Mod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    The new generation of certifications won't kill the current MCSA/MCSE and MCAD/MCSD certifications any more than those current certifications have killed the older versions of themselves. An MCSE on NT 4.0, for example, hasn't "expired", it's just that the technology is becoming more and more outdated. In time, Windows 2000/2003 will one day be obsolete and no longer used, but for now, they're a staple in IT environments and current MCSE's are in demand.

    Also, the setup for the MCST and MCITP certifications will be similar to MCSA and MCSE, respectively. The big change is going to be the MCA certification, which is designed to compete with CCIE and, to some extent, CISSP.

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    bighornsheepbighornsheep Member Posts: 1,506
    Slowhand wrote:
    The new generation of certifications won't kill the current MCSA/MCSE and MCAD/MCSD certifications any more than those current certifications have killed the older versions of themselves. An MCSE on NT 4.0, for example, hasn't "expired", it's just that the technology is becoming more and more outdated.

    Microsoft Certs are said to be valid as long as they are not retired, is that accurate? What are some of the retired Microsoft Certifications? MCP+I?
    Jack of all trades, master of none
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    SlowhandSlowhand Mod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    The certifications, themselves, aren't retired. However, some of the tests can no longer be taken. I believe the MCSE tests for NT 4 aren't being done anymore. The technology goes out of date, but the certs remain valid. I think the general idea is that, while no one will really buy NT 4 as a server operating system in this day and age, there are still NT 4 networks out there that need administration.

    And yes, I believe MCP+I is retired. Check out Microsoft's website for more information, I think they have a listing of retired exams. Just do a search for "MCSE".

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    Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    Specializations are enhancements to the MCSA/MCSE certs, IE specializations. It means you know the core OS, plus you focused on a specific area of MS technology. Right now, the 2 specializations for MCSA/MCSE are messaging and security. Messaging means you know Exchange. Security means you know how to secure a MS network.
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