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how'd u manage all the config files?

If you want to change the topology of your home lab to meet other topics, what do you do about all those config files on each router/switch? I figure i can rename the config file in switches, but for routers i have no idea. copy them to tftp server? what's your advises?

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    BubbaJBubbaJ Member Posts: 323
    madonion wrote:
    If you want to change the topology of your home lab to meet other topics, what do you do about all those config files on each router/switch? I figure i can rename the config file in switches, but for routers i have no idea. copy them to tftp server? what's your advises?
    IOS based switches and routers can be handled the same way - either rename or copy with TFTP. With the switches, you will have to remember to do something with the vlan.dat file or you will end up with the same VLANs as before.
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    marlon23marlon23 Member Posts: 164 ■■□□□□□□□□
    LAB: 7609-S, 7606-S, 10008, 2x 7301, 7204, 7201 + bunch of ISRs & CAT switches
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    mikej412mikej412 Member Posts: 10,086 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Well, there's a lot to be said for consistancy and standards (and the same password). With a few routers, you can have a "standard config" and just "cut and paste."

    With anything larger that involves more than backing up individual routers (and restoring different configurations) -- you need a plan.

    I keep a base configuration for all my routers/switches (including the vlan.dat as mentioned by BubbaJ icon_cool.gif ) on a tftp server.

    The trick for the CCIE lab is to use Frame-Relay, since you can configure a full mesh, and then enable interfaces (DLCIs) as needed (and most of the fun stuff involves Frame-relay configurations). I've still got a few direct serial connections for PPP and multilink -- and I can reconfigure some 2521s to get more serial connections as needed (taking them out of the giant frame-relay cloud I have).

    If you backup to a tftp server, look at automating with something like winbatch or a Linux Server. It takes less time for one of my Linux servers to update all of my routers, then it would take me to manually copy and paste configurations to just 3 of my routers.

    You'd use one subdirectory for your "base configuration." Then as you try different labs -- you could save the configurations to other subdirectories based on lab names/number (like from the sybex CCNA book).

    As you hit the CCNP -- you might have an EIGRP tftp sub-directory, OSPF, BGP, etc.... You may have PPP-pap, PPP-chap, PPP-multilink, PPP-compress, etc. Anything you might want to use as a future starting point for a new lab or for review, you'd save.

    With the CCNP -- when in doubt, save the config -- you might want to try something you did earlier when you are studying for the CIT exam
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
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    Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    Of course, with learning, it is best done by repetition. So, if you have to rebuild your configurations each time, you'll get quite proficient with the commands, which is extremely helpful on the test.

    If you simply copy and paste, you might forget your fundamentals.
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    BubbaJBubbaJ Member Posts: 323
    Danman32 wrote:
    Of course, with learning, it is best done by repetition. So, if you have to rebuild your configurations each time, you'll get quite proficient with the commands, which is extremely helpful on the test.

    If you simply copy and paste, you might forget your fundamentals.
    I agree, but, with limited time and a particular study focus, it is nice to be able to pull up a base configuration. This helps to keep you focused on what you are trying to practice. I don't mean to say that complete, end-to-end practice sessions are not necessary, but those should come after you have learned and practiced each technology.
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