wlan rf stectrum analyzer

darkuserdarkuser Member Posts: 620 ■■■□□□□□□□
does anyone know of a good rf spectrum analyzer for wireless ???

is there a software package i can download and use a pcmcia card as the transmitter ???
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Comments

  • forbeslforbesl Member Posts: 454
  • darkuserdarkuser Member Posts: 620 ■■■□□□□□□□
    thanks

    http://www.metageek.net/index.php

    ive been looking at this cheapo thing too.

    we've got a 10,500 sq foot room with 100 foot ceilings that we're doing pos in.
    it's a bloody rf nightmare ....

    and even worse ticket sales are processed over telnet which constantly
    disconnects.

    when there are a lot of people in the room it gets worse.

    we've tried adding ap's but that only overlapped coverage and increased roaming.

    i'm also thinking about high-gain or industrial antenna's
    rm -rf /
  • forbeslforbesl Member Posts: 454
    In a situation like that, there's a lot to be said about old-fashioned copper cable..... icon_lol.gif

    That little device your looking at might just do the trick. I pointed you to Fluke because I've used their test equipment for years and I'm really satisfied with their products and service. But on a strict budget, that wi-spy could be what you're lookin' for.

    Shoot, with our budget situation the way it is right now, we might not even be able to afford the wi-spy. icon_sad.gif
  • darkuserdarkuser Member Posts: 620 ■■■□□□□□□□
    forbesl wrote:
    In a situation like that, there's a lot to be said about old-fashioned copper cable..... icon_lol.gif

    my point exactly ..... but the administration wants wireless in that room
    since it can be broken down and set up by non techies for events.
    also due to a "historical significance" we can't mount industrial antenna's.
    I'm looking at the linksys high-gain thingyto attach to the ap's.

    That little device your looking at might just do the trick. I pointed you to Fluke because I've used their test equipment for years and I'm really satisfied with their products and service. But on a strict budget, that wi-spy could be what you're lookin' for.

    i got it
    it's pretty cute
    been playing with it for two days at home
    cordless phone, microwave.

    we found a microwave in a close by office that overlaps on channel 11
    we turned it on and watched a big rectangle cut through the signal on the spectral analysis.

    (which one on the pos ap's was set for) now they're set for 1,6

    Shoot, with our budget situation the way it is right now, we might not even be able to afford the wi-spy. icon_sad.gif
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  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,253 Admin
    darkuser wrote:
    i'm also thinking about high-gain or industrial antenna's
    In a large area, think about using higain antennas before you bump up your transmission power. If your wireless stations are fixed, a few directional antennas will do wonders, and they don't need to be "industrial" to be effective. Mobile wireless stations require a larger field coverage depending on where they are able to move to. Panel antennas may be all that you need. See what's on sale at ebay.com.
  • darkuserdarkuser Member Posts: 620 ■■■□□□□□□□
    jd would you recommend these cisco wireless certs ???
    my boss may send me ....


    This message contains graphics. If you do not see the graphics, click here to view.



    Dear xxxxxx,

    Network professionals pursuing the Advanced Wireless Design Specialist and Advanced Wireless Support Specialist certification now have a second training option to help them prepare for the required certification exams: Candidates will be equally prepared for the required Wireless certification exams no matter which path they choose. To prepare for the certification exams, candidates need to know all of the material covered in either path 1, or path 2:


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    Path 2: Take three classes: Aironet Wireless LAN Fundamentals and Site Survey (AWFSS), Aironet Wireless LAN Advanced Topics (AWLAT), and Cisco Unified Wireless Networking (CUWN).

    These classes teach candidates about Airespace and Cisco® Aironet® products separately: CUWN focuses on Airespace, while Cisco® Aironet® products are taught in AWFSS and AWLAT. Combined, these three classes impart the same skills and knowledge as the classes offered in Path 1. Take path 2 if you’d prefer to spread your training out over a period ot time,or need training on just Cisco® Aironet® or Airespace alone.



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    Aironet Wireless LAN Advanced Topics (AWLAT)
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    Cisco Wireless LAN Fundamentals (CWLF)
    Cisco Wireless LAN Advanced Topics (CWLAT)


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    Path 2:

    Aironet Wireless LAN Fundamentals and Site Survey (AWFSS)
    Aironet Wireless LAN Advanced Topics (AWLAT)
    Cisco Unified Wireless Networking (CUWN)


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    rm -rf /
  • darkuserdarkuser Member Posts: 620 ■■■□□□□□□□
    jdmurray wrote:
    darkuser wrote:
    i'm also thinking about high-gain or industrial antenna's
    In a large area, think about using higain antennas before you bump up your transmission power. If your wireless stations are fixed, a few directional antennas will do wonders, and they don't need to be "industrial" to be effective. Mobile wireless stations require a larger field coverage depending on where they are able to move to. Panel antennas may be all that you need. See what's on sale at ebay.com.

    i left something out ....
    the staions are "old" pc's using the aironet 350 pci cards (win2k).
    under a desk.
    we bought cables to extend the antenna's above the desks to about eye level.
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  • darwinismdarwinism Member Posts: 59 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Probably not gonna find software that will turn your PCMCIA card into a spectrum analyzer. You can find tons of software that will show 802.11B traffic. Check out these guys for SA's.

    Full blown SA's
    http://avcomofva.com/

    The good thing about the Avcom units, you can get up/down converts to target different spectrums.

    Also Anritsu Site Masters are badass, you can normally find them on ebay. Tektronix 491's are good too.

    If it doesnt need to be mobile you can find the good 'ole HP 8565a's, they weight a ton but can do 10Mhz to 22Ghz and I think there is an option to even go to 44Ghz, but I could be mistaken.
    If you are living in the Columbus, OH area and studying for the CCNA click the following link.

    CCNA looking for study partners in Columbus, OH
  • forbeslforbesl Member Posts: 454
    darkuser wrote:
    Dear xxxxxx,

    Aha! Now we know your real name!!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
  • darkuserdarkuser Member Posts: 620 ■■■□□□□□□□
    wow that's some piece of hardware .... reminds me of when i went to devry and was sooooo exited to buy a used occiloscope from them ....

    darwinism wrote:
    Probably not gonna find software that will turn your PCMCIA card into a spectrum analyzer. You can find tons of software that will show 802.11B traffic. Check out these guys for SA's.

    Full blown SA's
    http://avcomofva.com/

    The good thing about the Avcom units, you can get up/down converts to target different spectrums.

    Also Anritsu Site Masters are badass, you can normally find them on ebay. Tektronix 491's are good too.

    If it doesnt need to be mobile you can find the good 'ole HP 8565a's, they weight a ton but can do 10Mhz to 22Ghz and I think there is an option to even go to 44Ghz, but I could be mistaken.
    rm -rf /
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