Typical Head of IT answer!!!!!!!!!!

itdaddyitdaddy Senior MemberMember Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
Hey guys, this is what pisses me off. This is my bosses answer to this employees question of how to get a drive back. This what I deal with on a daily basis. And he is head of IT.
Can you believe this? I do not know everything but I know how things work! And this is a joke.
When my boss says we can't, I say we can. He is always mad at me.
What do I do? help icon_eek.gif

Ryan,

When you have a couple of minutes, click on Start - Run and in the box type in

gpupdate /force

and click ok.

This should redo your logon setting and map you to the V drive.

Scott



From: Ryan
Sent: Friday, April 13, 2007 1:47 PM
To: Scott (bossman)
Subject: I think Im Missing the V Drive


Just to make sure, tell me where exactly it is supposed to be, and ill double check to see if i have it, but I honestly think that Im missing the V Drive...


Thanks

Ryan

Comments

  • mrhaun03mrhaun03 Member Posts: 359
    Why wouldn't he just tell him how to map a drive?
    Working on Linux+
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,353
    Maybe he wants as few people to create static mappings as possible and instead do mappings through group policy to administratively control it from a centralized location. If a new login script was added to Group Policy, all that user has to really do is log off and log back on if they haven't logged off in a while, and it should appear. I usually do a gpupdate /force when I make a change and then reboot/relog afterwards to be safe.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    we dont use GPO mapping ; we run a logon script; he knows this.
    i am not mad at my boss; just frustrated to see how many guys outthere who know the old mainframe stuff but do not not any new stuff are head of IT.
    he is a smart guy but just in his financial software. it just makes me mad!
    ;D
    robert
  • RobinMRobinM Member Posts: 10 ■□□□□□□□□□
    In my experience the IT Manager role is not meant to be as technical as an administrator/analyst role.
  • SmallguySmallguy Member Posts: 597
    I think the issue is pride alto of people who are higher up do ont want ot admit they may have lost a step or 2 not being in the trenches any more


    my old boss was a great guy but he used to go behind our backs and make changes on various servers then we'd come to work everything wou7ld be busted phones ringing off the hook pissed off users/ management and we'd have to get it running ASAP.

    then he'd go make up a few lies


    sometimes having a technical manager is a burden

    my new manager is a great business man knows and has been and IT manager or several years he understands that we are the experts and filters things down to us depending on our strength's
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    sounds like my boss; when he leave son vacation all hell break loose. kind of funny
    but make a guy crazy hahahha
    if i dont know something, i just say it... I dont know! no big deal!

    hahhaa
    thanks
  • mr2nutmr2nut Member Posts: 269
    I used to have a boss like this. Was great at SQL but nothing else and was IT Manager. Really top lad though, still speak to him etc. but when i'm getting payed around £20k and he's getting double as they 'believe' he's older and more experienced, it just annoys me. People say interviewers aren't ageist, but they really are. I went for an interview for a job paying £30-35k but was told that i'm trying to go for a 30-35year olds salary when i'm 'only' 22....I mean what the hell?! If I know as much as the client requires for the position, it simply means i'm a faster learner and/or have more passion for my job. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    mr2nut

    the reason I laugh so hard is he knows that our login scripts are issued via NETLOGON share
    not GP....kills me this guy; the head cheese; has no clue about IT at all. he is great at his financial software but that is like someone who is great at OFFICE but does that mean he should be head of IT OMMMG! every day just makes me sick! you have no idea!
    some day I will be top dog or atleaset work with real IT guys! ;)I hate working for guys that no **** about IT!
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    for a job paying £30-35k but was told that i'm trying to go for a 30-35year olds salary when i'm 'only' 22....I mean what the hell?! If I know as much as the client requires for the position, it simply means i'm a faster learner and/or have more passion for my job.

    I agree I dont get it either but I guess that means job security when we are old huh!
    you will find a great job if you keep at it man that is my hope! ;) we have too!!
  • UncleCidUncleCid Member Posts: 66 ■■□□□□□□□□
    mr2nut wrote:
    I used to have a boss like this. Was great at SQL but nothing else and was IT Manager. Really top lad though, still speak to him etc. but when i'm getting payed around £20k and he's getting double as they 'believe' he's older and more experienced, it just annoys me. People say interviewers aren't ageist, but they really are. I went for an interview for a job paying £30-35k but was told that i'm trying to go for a 30-35year olds salary when i'm 'only' 22....I mean what the hell?! If I know as much as the client requires for the position, it simply means i'm a faster learner and/or have more passion for my job. icon_rolleyes.gif

    I hate to butt-in with my 2 cents.. but it may have to do with a stereotype responsibility thing. When a company looks at the average adult at 22, they may feel that it wouldn't be worth the investment. I mean think about it, if they are going to be relying on you to handle some sensitive stuff or servers that are gunna be loosing $10,000/min when they are down, they will likely want someone who is mature and/or be careless. (not that i'm saying everyone 22 is immature and/or careless <3)
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    So how are you actually applying the scripts? You can't just put them in the netlogon share and have things happen. Are you configuring these manually on every machine or what?
  • mr2nutmr2nut Member Posts: 269
    UncleCid wrote:
    mr2nut wrote:
    I used to have a boss like this. Was great at SQL but nothing else and was IT Manager. Really top lad though, still speak to him etc. but when i'm getting payed around £20k and he's getting double as they 'believe' he's older and more experienced, it just annoys me. People say interviewers aren't ageist, but they really are. I went for an interview for a job paying £30-35k but was told that i'm trying to go for a 30-35year olds salary when i'm 'only' 22....I mean what the hell?! If I know as much as the client requires for the position, it simply means i'm a faster learner and/or have more passion for my job. icon_rolleyes.gif

    I hate to butt-in with my 2 cents.. but it may have to do with a stereotype responsibility thing. When a company looks at the average adult at 22, they may feel that it wouldn't be worth the investment. I mean think about it, if they are going to be relying on you to handle some sensitive stuff or servers that are gunna be loosing $10,000/min when they are down, they will likely want someone who is mature and/or be careless. (not that i'm saying everyone 22 is immature and/or careless <3)

    I see what your saying, but if they would only give me a chance to proove my matureness then they would realise. It's a simple case of the older generations watching their own asses and playing on the old fact that they are more experienced from more years in IT.

    These days, this simply isn't the case and you'll find that the majority of up and coming IT guys are mostly around my age (maybe a bit older up high 20s/early 30s) and learn and react far faster.
  • mr2nutmr2nut Member Posts: 269
    itdaddy wrote:
    I agree I dont get it either but I guess that means job security when we are old huh!

    Too right :D
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    dynamik

    script is in netlogon and then magic happens ahhaah no in the Ad users properties all user
    are point to a file called login.bat which runs the script. but like i said doing a GPupdate
    will never reestablish the map drive you have to go into the netlogon and run the login.bat file
    or reboot and login. My boss thought that is how it is done but technically not. you can however setup login scripts in there in their specific spot but in this case the netlogin share is to everyone and in the user properties under login it has the login.bat set there. But you are right dynamik there has to be a place where when they login it kicks it off and in the user properties in AD users groups it is there where you put the file login.bat. you are correct. it is not in the GPO which you could do it there. he knows it is not in there that was what was so funny.)
    ;)
    the point was my boss who is head of IT doesnt really know how things work and makes decsions off what he thinks he knows it is Sad! you have to see it to believe it. there is more but wouldmake a guy like me more nutz talking about it:)
  • loxleynewloxleynew Member Posts: 405
    Did he reply with that email and tell them or you they cannot remap the drive? Or did he just think the gpupdate would remap the drive? Also does he act like he knows it all or he get pissy when you correct him?

    From my understanding IT managers don't really deal with the work that much, they just deal it down to the network admin, sys admin. ect. Even though re-mapping a drive is one of the first things you learn when you work in the IT field ;P There's like 4 different ways to re-map the drive and that wasn't one of them icon_sad.gif
  • manny355manny355 Member Posts: 134
    Yeah...i've come across a boss or two who would do the same.

    We run our drive mappings through login scripts as well and gpupdate would not work in those situations. Usually IT managers are removed from grunt work like remapping drives...its my opinion that he just threw something quick out...i'm sure if he had taken the time to think about the question he would have sent a better answer...especially if he knows the drive mappings are scripted via netlogon.
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    itdaddy wrote:
    just frustrated to see how many guys outthere who know the old mainframe stuff but do not not any new stuff are head of IT.

    With all due respect, and considering that we all come at our profession from different angles and technical backgrounds, this statement seems at best naive...

    The mainframe hardware line has grown as a percentage of IBM's sales in recent years (currently about 3%). However, the follow-on sales of mainframe hardware and software licenses is in the neighborhood of ~25% of IBM's overall sales...

    That's alot of cash....

    When I first entered IT in the late 80's, I did mainframe work. At the time, mainframes were so huge that they easily filled very large datacenters. Mainframes were old then and were supposedly going the way of the dinosaur. That's been repeated multiple times over my 20 year career, yet mainframes are still heavily used and there are many companies (outside of IBM) that make money selling mainframe related products and software. Mainframes also now have a much smaller physical footprint (and have since the mid-90's when the move to CMOS was made).

    I don't intend to sound like a mainframe bigot here (although it likely comes across that way); IMO, the underlying technology is irrelevant, as the intent of IT is to automate business functions.

    Again, my intent is not to insult. There was a quote I heard (and have now misplaced the source) that basically said "nothing new has been invented in IT since the mid-1970's". In some ways I don't totally agree, but in many ways this statement is true. Mainframes are a great example of where this statement is true.

    For example, so much of what is considered "new" today, was pioneered in mainframe computing. One great example is virtualization. The first virtualized systems that I worked on were mainframe MVS and VM systems. This was in the 1980's (I do realize that even these virtualized systems had predecessors).

    Because I do quite a bit of work related to automation, process and quality improvements, etc. (again, irrespective of the underlying technology) there is one interesting trend that I find occurring quite often.

    Mainframes support easy calculations of ROI, which is not always as easy to do in distributed systems. In other words, it's very easy for organizations that do some type of charge-back to bill based on certain mainframe characteristics, such as cpu second. This hasn't always been as easy in any distributed environment, although it has improved in recent years. The interesting trend that I find is that often, organizations that have mainframes will subsidize other types of computing into their mainframe billing model. I have also seen other interesting things buried in there, like corporate jets! However, hands down, one of the most common things to see is that distributed systems in many large organizations are subsidized and really don't pay their own way....

    To get back to the point here; it seems to me that there's much more to IT than knowing how to map drives. In fact, that this is even on the radar of someone who is in charge of a significant deployment of IT amazes me (isn't there a help desk to call? even better, isn't there a FAQ or procedure where users could get self-help for stuff like this?). What amazes me even more is the insinuation that mapping drives is somehow "new" technology....

    MS
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    eMeS

    you guys are right but he wouldnt have a clue on anything he has no experience and no real desire to understand it. he just pays someone to do it but yeah he just thru it out

    and correction eMes dude sorry this guy has no clue on mainframe stuff; if he knew the Unix mainframe like he should, he would understand it better mainframe you are right is heavy IT based; i wasnt thinking when i wrote that he only knows the top level software and how it works an and not true main frame my bad easy sorry I said that i didnt get specific; forgot how detailed we are all on this form sorry mainframe dude who know uNix mainframe etc.. really know there stuff but this guy knows only the financial software portion and I misquoted myself.
    i am sorry;
    icon_redface.gif
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,088 ■■■■□□□□□□
    eMeS wrote:
    To get back to the point here; it seems to me that there's much more to IT than knowing how to map drives. In fact, that this is even on the radar of someone who is in charge of a significant deployment of IT amazes me (isn't there a help desk to call? even better, isn't there a FAQ or procedure where users could get self-help for stuff like this?). What amazes me even more is the insinuation that mapping drives is somehow "new" technology....

    dude you are right; i feel so bad for saying the wrong words and by your certs man you are doing awesome for yourself. yeah he is head of IT and I wasnt around to help and then the employee called me to ask for help on the mapped drive issue. and all i did was remap it fast
    with unc to netlogon on the server executed the batch script and bam done..

    it was then i was shocked too. you wouldnt believe what he spends money on. I just laugh
    no insite on what is really needed. only listens to the computer vendor we go thru; yeah we need this or we need that; they have plenty of mone to blow but not on me. well this year i will get my raise; i built a program that installs some software of ours the vendor company has no way to install it but by hand. well i automated the entire process and created a web UI and works awesome. and my boss knows it so asking for a raise this year.

    but i am sorry i dogged main frame guys by mistake; actually mainframe is the root of all IT
    i agree and is till there today; you are right. i was stupid and misquoted myself. he is not mainframe guy but work ed ith the software that mainframe pushe dout. big big difference.
    i am sorry;
    icon_redface.gif
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