Cert useful at all?

tcp/udptcp/udp Member Posts: 16 ■□□□□□□□□□
I am thinking of taking the exam, but I just can't seem to see a lot of demand/recognition of it.
Did it help any of you find a job, or do you see jobs that require Linux+ ? I mean, don't get me wrong, it is a cool thing to have, but does it help professionally?

Comments

  • sthomassthomas Member Posts: 1,240 ■■■□□□□□□□
    It helped me get my first IT job. Just because a job does not mention a certification as required or prefered in the job description does not mean it wouldn't help in getting the job. Linux+ on its own probably won't help much in getting a Linux Admin job but it may help when looking for a job when you do general systems administration in a Windows and Linux environment, or a Desktop Support job where there is some Linux in the mix. I have seen jobs that mention Linux+ in the description you just have to know where to look.

    http://seeker.dice.com/jobsearch/servlet/JobSearch?op=302&dockey=xml/1/b/[email protected]&source=19&FREE_TEXT=CompTIA+Linux
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Specific Linux certifications, save for possibly the RHCE, are rarely asked for in a job description. I've only seen RHCE, and on a related type of job, SCSA. Linux certifications, in general, are a good thing to help you get a job. I've had lots of job offers based on the Linux+ cert being on my resume when I've had it on job boards, and it was always intriguing to potential employers when I talked to them. The same goes for the LPI certification, where very few employers ask for it by name, but will definitely notice when you've got it.

    Keep in mind, though, Linux+ isn't as well-known and recognized as A+ and Network+, so you'll see those a lot more than you would Linux+. However, it does carry weight, and when you're amassing other certs on your resume, it looks really good alongside the other CompTIA certs, (not to mention alongside the Cisco and Microsoft certs). I don't regret taking my Linux+ cert, and I definitely recommend it to anyone interested in learning Linux and Unix, and anyone looking to work with them in the field.

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  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    I took a class focused on teaching the Linux+ material

    I thought it was great knowledge that i gained....

    Linux/Unix is definatley valuable knowledge to have anyway

    I definatley plan to sit this exam sometime in the next year

    Hope this helps :D
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    shednik wrote:
    I took a class focused on teaching the Linux+ material

    I thought it was great knowledge that i gained....

    Linux/Unix is definatley valuable knowledge to have anyway

    I definatley plan to sit this exam sometime in the next year

    Hope this helps :D

    Was the class at CCAC? (Probably not since you sig mentions a BS)

    I used the class I took to pass the exam back in 2004. I don't run into Linux much with my job and don't remember enough to really troubleshoot an issue on my own, but the knowledge I gained has helped when I do come across a Linux system.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    ajs1976 wrote:
    Was the class at CCAC? (Probably not since you sig mentions a BS)


    Nah, I'm working on my BS @ Robert Morris University, guy who taught it was insane but his labs helped me learn alot
  • MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    The last job I interviewed for asked me if I had any educational Linux training. If I had Linux+ I would have been able to say yes.

    I didn't get the job because of my age BTW. lol
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Mishra wrote:
    The last job I interviewed for asked me if I had any educational Linux training. If I had Linux+ I would have been able to say yes.

    I didn't get the job because of my age BTW. lol

    I was curious, Mishra, from looking at your other post about wanting to be in management, how old are you?

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  • MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote:
    Mishra wrote:
    The last job I interviewed for asked me if I had any educational Linux training. If I had Linux+ I would have been able to say yes.

    I didn't get the job because of my age BTW. lol

    I was curious, Mishra, from looking at your other post about wanting to be in management, how old are you?

    22

    I look as young as 14. I get judged on that too.

    And I promise I am not just being negative. It is honestly the truth.
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Age can be a factor, both in getting hired and being promoted. Generally, when you're in the younger bracket, you have to stick with a company for a while before they look at promotions. That's also a good way to get yourself noticed by other employers. Whatever job you have now, or that you're planning on getting next, stick with it at least 12 months, and you'll have enough clout to ward off any misgivings hiring managers might have about your age, (where they worry you aren't responsible enough, that you won't stay with the company, etc).

    And I noticed that you'd posted your age in the other question, I guess I wasn't reading it close enough.

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  • MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote:
    Age can be a factor, both in getting hired and being promoted. Generally, when you're in the younger bracket, you have to stick with a company for a while before they look at promotions. That's also a good way to get yourself noticed by other employers. Whatever job you have now, or that you're planning on getting next, stick with it at least 12 months, and you'll have enough clout to ward off any misgivings hiring managers might have about your age, (where they worry you aren't responsible enough, that you won't stay with the company, etc).

    And I noticed that you'd posted your age in the other question, I guess I wasn't reading it close enough.

    That stereotype really is a pain in the ass... I can prove and have proved my technical ability to companies but they still don't hire me. I find jobs pretty quick as long as I am getting interviews because I can do well to sell myself... But there is still those who will just not listen to you and stick to the "he is too young" decision. Even when being promoted.

    Just to let you know, I applied for a job at Lexmark and they turned me down even after having a phone interview with the Linux manager (another department) and he said "I'm sad that I didn't get to find you first because you are one of the best techie teksystems has sent me."

    I found out later that they didn't hire me because I said in the interview that I had only graduated from high school 3 years ago. Which I don't remember saying... I have a feeling they looked me up.
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  • snadamsnadam Member Posts: 2,234 ■■■■□□□□□□
    sthomas wrote:
    It helped me get my first IT job. Just because a job does not mention a certification as required or prefered in the job description does not mean it wouldn't help in getting the job. Linux+ on its own probably won't help much in getting a Linux Admin job but it may help when looking for a job when you do general systems administration in a Windows and Linux environment, or a Desktop Support job where there is some Linux in the mix. I have seen jobs that mention Linux+ in the description you just have to know where to look.

    http://seeker.dice.com/jobsearch/servlet/JobSearch?op=302&dockey=xml/1/b/[email protected]&source=19&FREE_TEXT=CompTIA+Linux


    100% percent agree with above statement.

    Most dice.com searches ive seen lately have "Linux experience a PLUS" in job requirements. Once that sticks out was an entry level job in AZ for Maricopa Community Colleges that paid about 40k-48k, with at 0-1 years of linux experience. They had a level II job that paid even more. My numbers might be a little skewed, but still thats not too bad a salary for entry level job!

    Linux+ cert looks like a nice handy cert to have in your portfolio.

    I will have to go for that one in time.
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  • tcp/udptcp/udp Member Posts: 16 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Sounds like you are mostly in favour of having this cert, so I will go for it.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Yup, it's a good cert to have. Think of it in terms of the other CompTIA certs. A+ doesn't necessarily make you a Windows systems admin, but it's a great start if you're looking to get into things like MCSA/MCSE. Network+ skills are a great foundation for a network engineer, and the cert is a very solid precursor to CCNA and the rest of the Cisco path. Linux+ is a very good way to start getting into Linux and Unix, and it's a very good way to get the experience and knowledge you need to jump into things like LPIC, SCSA, and RHCE.

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