ISDN on the exam?

redgoblinredgoblin Member Posts: 57 ■■□□□□□□□□
I'm currently working on configuring ISDN in my home lab for the purposes of the exam and skipping through past forum entries, it seems that configuring ISDN on the exam would not be very likely?? am I right here. With only a limited amount of time before the exam, I don't want to waste time configuring a topic that won't even be tested?

Any advice on this?

Comments

  • borumasborumas Member Posts: 244 ■■■□□□□□□□
    My advice is don't worry about spending much time studying for it, I would wager at most you might get one question dealing with it on the exam. I had seen many other's post after taking the test and ISDN did not appear to be a covered in detail as they seem to be dropping that from the test now.
  • malcyboodmalcybood Member Posts: 900 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would say learn the following basics to do with ISDN, you may get a question on one of these:

    ISDN BRI - 2 Data + 1 Bearer Channel (each channel 64k and bearer is 16k)
    ISDN PRI - 23 Data + 1 Bearer Channel

    Data channel usd for signalling

    The switch type is the first thing you configure

    Learn how to configure a spid

    Learn how to configure the dialer list and apply it to the interface

    If you cover the above you should be OK for the current CCNA!

    If anyone thinks I've missed anything please add

    Cheers
    Malc
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Member Posts: 2,620 ■■■■■■■■□□
    From a purely strategy standpoint I wouldn't even study ISDN outside of how many channels are in a BRI/PRI... The time you spend learning that stuff could better be spent learning more important stuff that will be on the test, like faster subnetting, routing protocols, and frame relay. If you have a time deadline drop ISDN.
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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  • redgoblinredgoblin Member Posts: 57 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the replies guys.

    Also on a side note, is it within the scope of the exam to test DHCP configurations?
  • dtlokeedtlokee Member Posts: 2,378 ■■■■□□□□□□
    DHCP configuration is not in the official courseware so I would say no. Since Cisco is adding DHCP and DHCP configuration to the new exams, you may see it as a beta question that does not count towards your score.
    The only easy day was yesterday!
  • malcyboodmalcybood Member Posts: 900 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I know ISDN isn't used as often out in the field, but remember it IS still on the current objectives.

    The stuff I suggested doesn't take long to learn, I just mean look at my last post and remember those 4 lines, not study them in depth.

    The only one you may need to look at a bit yourself is how to configure a spid (easy one line command) and how to create a dialer list and apply it to an interface, which if you know how to deal with access lists is a piece of cake! The phrase "specify interesting traffic" is something you may come across to do with dialer lists.

    For the 30 minutes it will take to learn this stuff it could be the difference between passing and failing the exam by 1 question as we have seen here quite a few posts people missing the exam with 847.

    It's up to you, but if I was resitting the exam this is what I'd learn to do with ISDN...........

    You may get a DHCP question but I doubt it will be anything too difficult so don't go into it too much. You'd be better doing some NAT revision as that is another one some people seem to forget about and get stung by.

    good luck anyway and let us know how you get on :D
  • PashPash Member Posts: 1,600 ■■■■■□□□□□
    malcybood wrote:
    I know ISDN isn't used as often out in the field, but remember it IS still on the current objectives.

    The stuff I suggested doesn't take long to learn, I just mean look at my last post and remember those 4 lines, not study them in depth.

    The only one you may need to look at a bit yourself is how to configure a spid (easy one line command) and how to create a dialer list and apply it to an interface, which if you know how to deal with access lists is a piece of cake! The phrase "specify interesting traffic" is something you may come across to do with dialer lists.

    For the 30 minutes it will take to learn this stuff it could be the difference between passing and failing the exam by 1 question as we have seen here quite a few posts people missing the exam with 847.

    It's up to you, but if I was resitting the exam this is what I'd learn to do with ISDN...........

    You may get a DHCP question but I doubt it will be anything too difficult so don't go into it too much. You'd be better doing some NAT revision as that is another one some people seem to forget about and get stung by.

    good luck anyway and let us know how you get on :D

    Many companies still use ISDN for PABX communications, while it is slowly being phased out by companies who are large enoguh to invest in better lines with Qos implemented. Id say you could make a nice wage working for British Telecom over here having a wealth of knowledge in ISDN. Infact im sure of it :)

    BUT back on topic...I revised four lines about ISDN before I took the test....i kept my toes crossed throughout the whole exam icon_redface.gificon_rolleyes.gif haha infact i just looked at my old revision schedule for the CCNA exam, and on the last two weeks leading up to the exam most of the topics were marked revised, just needing questions, right up to the night before ISDN was left on there and I just put "bollocks" next to it :D

    You make some good points malcy, revising what you mentioned above would be bare minimums and it could make or break the party.
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • malcyboodmalcybood Member Posts: 900 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Pash wrote:
    Many companies still use ISDN for PABX communications, while it is slowly being phased out by companies who are large enoguh to invest in better lines with Qos implemented. Id say you could make a nice wage working for British Telecom over here having a wealth of knowledge in ISDN. Infact im sure of it :)

    Pash, valid point for PABX phone systems and Video conferencing ISDN is still used quite widespread in the UK as far as I'm aware. Also ISDN is not used as a primary data network connection however it is still used as a "fallover" backup line in many networks.
  • tech-airmantech-airman Member Posts: 953
    There's also the fun of IDSL. :)
  • iDShaDoWiDShaDoW Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
    malcybood wrote:
    ISDN BRI - 2 Data + 1 Bearer Channel (each channel 64k and bearer is 16k)
    ISDN PRI - 23 Data + 1 Bearer Channel

    Bearer channel usd for signalling

    Sorry, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't the B-channels (Bear) used for sending data while the D-channel (Delta) is used for call signaling?

    I'm still studying myself so I'm probably wrong.

    I just didn't notice anyone else mention anything so far in this post and was wondering if I had my information mixed up.
  • kafifi13kafifi13 Member Posts: 259
    iDShaDoW wrote:
    malcybood wrote:
    ISDN BRI - 2 Data + 1 Bearer Channel (each channel 64k and bearer is 16k)
    ISDN PRI - 23 Data + 1 Bearer Channel

    Bearer channel usd for signalling

    Sorry, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't the B-channels (Bear) used for sending data while the D-channel (Delta) is used for call signaling?

    I'm still studying myself so I'm probably wrong.

    I just didn't notice anyone else mention anything so far in this post and was wondering if I had my information mixed up.

    Your right on the money
  • malcyboodmalcybood Member Posts: 900 ■■■□□□□□□□
    kafifi13 wrote:
    iDShaDoW wrote:
    malcybood wrote:
    ISDN BRI - 2 Data + 1 Bearer Channel (each channel 64k and bearer is 16k)
    ISDN PRI - 23 Data + 1 Bearer Channel

    Bearer channel usd for signalling

    Sorry, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't the B-channels (Bear) used for sending data while the D-channel (Delta) is used for call signaling?

    I'm still studying myself so I'm probably wrong.

    I just didn't notice anyone else mention anything so far in this post and was wondering if I had my information mixed up.

    Your right on the money

    Yeah sorry that's my bad, thinking one thing typing another icon_confused.gif too many late nights!
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