Just dont get this ( or maybe I do and dont understand )

amyamandaallenamyamandaallen Member Posts: 316
Hi,

Im setting up a small business server for the 282 exam. All installed ok.

Now for this I need a static IP and a domain name. Being a skinflint I downloaded no-ip ( which served me well for areas of the 290 exam ). Now it asked me for a hostname which I called sbsdomain ( for example ) and it gave me the .no-ip.org added to the end. Now is the hostname my actual pc's name or will it be part of my domain name ie to make my active directory domain name sbsdomain.no-ip.org? then if I call my pc sbs1 my FQDN will be sbs1.sbsdomain.no-ip.org?

Hopefully this makes sense ( but I doubt it ) :D
Remember I.T. means In Theory ( it should works )

Comments

  • KhattabKhattab Member Posts: 97 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thats a very good question.... i'd be very interested in seeing if any of the guys around here have any input....

    Any ideas anyone?
  • keatronkeatron Security Tinkerer Member Posts: 1,213 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Hi,

    Im setting up a small business server for the 282 exam. All installed ok.

    Now for this I need a static IP and a domain name.
    Why didn't you just make up one like mydomain.com? or sbslab.com or sbslab.local or .test or pretty much .anything?
    Being a skinflint I downloaded no-ip ( which served me well for areas of the 290 exam ).
    Again, I'm not sure why you went through this step. Simply give the server a static private address, and go from there.
    Now it asked me for a hostname which I called sbsdomain ( for example ) and it gave me the .no-ip.org added to the end. Now is the hostname my actual pc's name or will it be part of my domain name ie to make my active directory domain name sbsdomain.no-ip.org? then if I call my pc sbs1 my FQDN will be sbs1.sbsdomain.no-ip.org?
    Actually what you did was create a subdomain of no-ip.org. sbsdomain.no-ip.org is a "child" of no-ip.org. I guess the only thing I'm failing to understand is why you needed hosted dns (I'm assuming that's what you're using no-ip for). You would configure your domain controller as a DNS server itself, it will perform dns functions for all hosts that are part of the new domain you created (that it will be the DC for). You would then configure forwarders on that DNS servers (that would point to your ISP dns) to resolve external domains and hosts (ones that aren't part of your newly created domain).
  • amyamandaallenamyamandaallen Member Posts: 316
    Hi,

    No-ip doesnt give to an actual domain name it just gives to a forwarder as such. I was trying to avoid buying both a domain name and a static IP.

    I need a proper domain name in order to get things like email and such routed to my server for this exams and hence cant have a private domain as the outside world wont see it as far as I know.
    Remember I.T. means In Theory ( it should works )
  • amyamandaallenamyamandaallen Member Posts: 316
    Help again please

    I've bought a domain name now and I can change/update the DNS record if I need to update the IP with my hosting provider.

    Now this is the bit I get but also dont. When I setup my AD I have to put .local in to somewhere. I know the .local is so the external world cant get to it. So when I setup my AD what do I call it? sbs1.mydomainname.me.uk.local? or something else? This its the bit I now dont get. The outside world also needs to be able to see my server for exchange and my web pages on my server.

    If anyone would be kind enough to help I'd be grateful icon_wink.gif
    Remember I.T. means In Theory ( it should works )
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,352 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Usually in this type of situation you'll have your Exchange server authoritiative for 2 different domains. If your internal AD infrastructure is hosting sbs1.mydomainname.me.local but you still want to use your Exchange server from the outside, you would then configure your Exchange server to also be authoritative for the sbs1.mydomainname.me.uk domain. You would need external dns for the sbs1.mydomainname.me.uk domain to host an MX record that points to the Exchange server. This external dns doesn't have to be an AD domain at all. It just needs to be something like BIND DNS, Windows DNS, etc... Now when someone wants to send mail to [email protected], they'll hit the external authoritative dns servers and see there is an mx record for a certain ip. This ip would be the either ISA publishing SMTP or it would be a front-end server that has a public ip. Even though that front-end server or back-end (however you have Exchange configured) is on the sbs1.mydomainname.me.uk.local domain, as stated earlier, it still configured to be authoritative for the sbs1.mydomainname.me.uk domain.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • amyamandaallenamyamandaallen Member Posts: 316
    Many thanks that explanation makes alot more sense.

    BIG thankyou!
    Remember I.T. means In Theory ( it should works )
Sign In or Register to comment.