How would setting up a webserver work in this environment?

KGhaleonKGhaleon Member Posts: 1,346 ■■■□□□□□□□
I live in a large condominium with several hundred people. The condo is surrounded by many access points, each giving a different set of private IP addresses to computers on this internal network. Is it possible to setup a webserver from here or would you normally need your own line?

If I query whatismyip.com I can get my outside IP address...but I'm not sure if using that would work. I've never played with domains names or web servers so I'm not sure how this works.

KG
Present goals: MCAS, MCSA, 70-680

Comments

  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Well, the way it works is that you'd be stealing someone else's connection to go to the outside and to let people into your server. There are tools to provide access to regular, dynamic addresses given out by ISP's a "permanent" connection. Keep in mind, going through someone else's line is risky for you, because at any moment, they could secure their access point and your server would be down. Also, in some places, you can get in legal trouble for using an internet line that isn't yours, especially for running a server on, (which could be construed as either being 'a business', or as being a server you're attempting to hide by piggybacking on a connection not registered to you). Your best bet, get your own line and set up your server that way. Otherwise, if you are intent on stealing someone's connection to do the job, consult some legal council before proceeding, to see what the extent of trouble you could get into if you're caught using a line that is not intended for general use by everyone.

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  • KGhaleonKGhaleon Member Posts: 1,346 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I figured, thanks for the response. If I setup a webserver...I'm assuming that I would then use that IP address from my ISP and then purchase and associate the domain name with it?

    KG
    Present goals: MCAS, MCSA, 70-680
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    If you're setting up a web server on a regular cable or DSL line, then you can use something like DynDNS as a temporary way to have a "permanent" connection. You purchase a domain name, point the DNS information at DynDNS' DNS servers, and follow the instructions they've given you for keeping the connection alive. You can even have a lot of home-routers (like Netgear or Linksys) to contact DynDNS and use the service for an active connection.

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  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    The host of the webserver needs to place the domain+IP (and MX + PTR and records for subdomains) in their DNS servers. This will be the authorative server for your domain. Then at the site where you registered your domain (godaddy.com, good and cheap) you change the name servers (usually 2) for the domain to the DNS servers at your host that hold the records.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Assuming there is a single Internet service and your whole building is sharing it...

    For it to work there has to be a way to get from the Internet IP of whatever ISP your building is using to the computer you have set up as a web server on the internal part of the network. This would likely involve having NAT set up on the router/firewall that is connected directly to the Internet service to redirect port 80 to your IP address for web requests. Since you don't have control over your building's firewall I don't think you're going to be successful.

    If you get your own Internet service and your own router you can set this up using the suggestions above.
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