Good anti-virus that dosn't use a lot of system resources?

christenm123christenm123 Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hey all, I'm looking for a reliable light-weight anti-virus that won't eat up all my system resources. The reason I'm asking is because I like to play computer games, but I don't want to turn off my anti-virus just because you never know. I'm using Panda right now. Any recomendations?

Comments

  • KasorKasor Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    You can turn off your AV when you play online game. Yes, there is a risk for your computer to get hit. However, you will get hit (if you are lucky) much more easier when you login to the online game portal.

    AV will not do much of work to protect you from online game. Virus can be easy to pass thru the game portal. Just make sure that you not using your admin account when you play online game and do a routine check on your computer everytime you finish the game.
    Kill All Suffer T "o" ReBorn
  • christenm123christenm123 Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Yeah, but I also want an AV thats good for my general computing as well that isn't a resource hog.
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,352 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I use Nod32. Uses very few system resources.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • christenm123christenm123 Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks a lot. I'll have to check that out later. :)
  • RTmarcRTmarc Member Posts: 1,082 ■■■□□□□□□□
    royal wrote:
    I use Nod32. Uses very few system resources.
    +1

    Personally, I use it on everyone of my machines as well as those that family members own. From an enterprise perspective, I have it currently running on my Exchange 2007 cluster and we will be pushing it company wide over the next year.

    http://www.av-comparatives.org

    They recently ranked NOD32 as the best overall for this year.
  • TechJunkyTechJunky Member Posts: 881
    We use Nod32 here as well. Works GREAT. Plus is has a good remote admin install/update tool.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,082 Admin
    Yep, I also vote for NOD32 as being the least noticeable A/V I've used when updating and scanning. eEye's Blink Personal Edition is also very good for a complete Windows computer security solution, although its A/V is a little more noticeable than NOD32.
  • leefdaddyleefdaddy Member Posts: 405
    I also use nod32... have a few clients using it now also... very nice.
    Dustin Leefers
  • christenm123christenm123 Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I got NOD32 last night after work and its running on my desktop and laptop. Seems great so far, didn't make Counter-Strike Source or Day of Defeat Source lag at all. Thanks people!
  • mog27mog27 Member Posts: 302
    Nod32 seems to also detect and remove malware/spyware. Is it good enough to have this as both your AV and anti-spyware app?
    "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." -- Ben Franklin

    "The internet is a great way to get on the net." --Bob Dole
  • christenm123christenm123 Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I duno, I still like to do a Spybot scan every now and then.
  • sthomassthomas Member Posts: 1,240 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I always liked CA and AVG.
    Working on: MCSA 2012 R2
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,082 Admin
    The A/V companies are always trying to one-up each other's product by including more Spyware signatures in their virus definitions files. If you routinely surf unsafe Web sites and open email attachments, I would recommend still using all of the free, popular Spyware scanners (Adaware, Spybot S&D, AVG Anti-Spyware) on your computer just to be sure.
  • binarysoulbinarysoul Member Posts: 993
    The best anti-virus option is this: do NOT use one. I've had a PC for about eight years and I've never had any anti-virus program. I have no intention to get one for the rest of my life :)

    Every six months or so, I download a trial version and I can't recall a time when I had a virus. While exceptions exist, to me home-PC antivirus and anti-spam programs are just deceptive ways to intimidate people that they need it and exploit them.

    You must have a good firewall, good Interent habits, some security knowledge and you will be good.
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,352 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I agree with the whole notion of don't do stupid stuff on the internet. But as someone who does all my stocks, investments, banking, and other stuff online, I'd rather lose a few system resources that I will barely realize were lost and have some extra assurance that I'm safer than without.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    binarysoul wrote:
    The best anti-virus option is this: do NOT use one. I've had a PC for about eight years and I've never had any anti-virus program. I have no intention to get one for the rest of my life :)

    Every six months or so, I download a trial version and I can't recall a time when I had a virus. While exceptions exist, to me home-PC antivirus and anti-spam programs are just deceptive ways to intimidate people that they need it and exploit them.

    You must have a good firewall, good Interent habits, some security knowledge and you will be good.

    Someone with some security knowledge should know that recommending NO AV protection is bad. Bad, bad, bad. Firewalls don't stop email born viruses, nor do they stop viruses from malicious web sites. Good Internet habits are a given, because even AV won't protect you from stupidity or zero-day virus/exploits.

    I'm not trying to be critical, but I just want to throw my 2 cents in that what seems to work for you (if you picked up a root kit those free/trial scanners won't tell you) is not necessarily good advice for others.

    I also have to ask, are you married with children? :P
    Every time I leave on a business trip I'm not gone 2 days before my wife calls with a virus alert from an email attachment or my kids have some issue (and they just surf kid sites like neopets, disney, etc.). If I didn't have AV software on their machines... icon_eek.gif

    Also, if you worked in an Enterprise environment and told your boss "our firewall and some user training on security is all we need" I don't think that would fly. Just food for thought, no offence intended.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    sprkymrk wrote:
    binarysoul wrote:
    The best anti-virus option is this: do NOT use one. I've had a PC for about eight years and I've never had any anti-virus program. I have no intention to get one for the rest of my life :)

    Every six months or so, I download a trial version and I can't recall a time when I had a virus. While exceptions exist, to me home-PC antivirus and anti-spam programs are just deceptive ways to intimidate people that they need it and exploit them.

    You must have a good firewall, good Interent habits, some security knowledge and you will be good.

    Someone with some security knowledge should know that recommending NO AV protection is bad. Bad, bad, bad. Firewalls don't stop email born viruses, nor do they stop viruses from malicious web sites. Good Internet habits are a given, because even AV won't protect you from stupidity or zero-day virus/exploits.

    I'm not trying to be critical, but I just want to throw my 2 cents in that what seems to work for you (if you picked up a root kit those free/trial scanners won't tell you) is not necessarily good advice for others.

    I also have to ask, are you married with children? :P
    Every time I leave on a business trip I'm not gone 2 days before my wife calls with a virus alert from an email attachment or my kids have some issue (and they just surf kid sites like neopets, disney, etc.). If I didn't have AV software on their machines... icon_eek.gif

    Also, if you worked in an Enterprise environment and told your boss "our firewall and some user training on security is all we need" I don't think that would fly. Just food for thought, no offence intended.

    +1
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • binarysoulbinarysoul Member Posts: 993
    Actually, I carefully wrote what I meant to say :) I mentioned "home-PC antivirus", meaning antivirus is a must in an Enterprise. But I also wrote that "While exceptions exist...", i.e., there will always be arguments that an antivirus is a must regardless.

    So, you're right about kids and the wife doing things to invite viruses.

    Oh yeh, I do understand the common L3 firewall wouldn't be able to go after email attachments, phising and many other threats. But how many times have you seen people who have all the 'latest and greatest' antiviurs, antispam, anti-so-and-so and they're yet the victim?

    Depending on an antivirus is like locking your doors with expensive locks, but ignoring the fact that someone may get through the windows.

    Be very cuatious if you install OR don't install antivirus, either way you're not fully protected :)
  • binarysoulbinarysoul Member Posts: 993
    Actually, I carefully wrote what I meant to say :) I mentioned "home-PC antivirus", meaning antivirus is a must in an Enterprise. But I also wrote that "While exceptions exist...", i.e., there will always be arguments that an antivirus is a must regardless.

    So, you're right about kids and the wife doing things to invite viruses.

    Oh yeh, I do understand the common L3 firewall wouldn't be able to go after email attachments, phising and many other threats. But how many times have you seen people who have all the 'latest and greatest' antiviurs, antispam, anti-so-and-so and they're yet the victim?

    Depending on an antivirus is like locking your doors with expensive locks, but ignoring the fact that someone may get through the windows.

    Be very cuatious if you install OR don't install antivirus, either way you're not fully protected :)
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the clarification binarysoul. And to expand upon your statement, depending upon any single security solution (whether it is common sense, firewall, AV, encryption, etc.) to the exclusion of others is not wise. icon_cool.gif
    All things are possible, only believe.
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