C$

Lee HLee H Member Posts: 1,135
Hi Guys

Is it possible to find out what the system model is and how much memory is in a PC just by C$ into the local hard drive

I need to find out this info and all i can do at present is C$

Any ideas

Lee H
.

Comments

  • PashPash Member Posts: 1,600 ■■■■■□□□□□
    No, because the best way to obtain pc model info and installed RAM on a windows machine is to run dxdiag, but if you are using a mapped drive to a remote computer you can't run it locally on the machine.

    That said, there might be a way to run dxdiag in bacground and produce a log file from it using a switch, have a search.
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • SieSie Member Posts: 1,195
    Remote command "systeminfo" on the machine in question?
    Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools
  • PashPash Member Posts: 1,600 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Sie wrote:
    Remote command "systeminfo" on the machine in question?

    I don't think that is possible, from what i gather he has only access to files and folders in the C: of that PC. He can't exe files or commands.
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • Lee HLee H Member Posts: 1,135
    In a normal situation i would ring the person and PC Duo into the PC and take a look myself, but the person is not there so hence my question

    I must be the only person to ever wonder this, lol


    Lee H
    .
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586
    You can use the wmic command that comes from the windows admin pack

    e.g.
    wmic /node:"computername" memlogical get totalphysicalmemory
    
  • Lee HLee H Member Posts: 1,135
    i need more info for that one wasted time please

    do i run it from cmd?
    .
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586
    Yes it is command line, although you need windows admin pack installed. wmic is a bit complicated at first but once you start using it you find out how useful it is. I my self have used it to find serial numbers of computers, release an IP address on a remote computer, and find who uses what computers.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Wastedtime's solution is the best, but FYI you can do it through computer management as well.

    In ADUC, select the computer and right click, choose Manage. Then at the top left, right click the COMPUTER MANAGEMENT (computer name) and select Properties. Now you can see the make and model, CPU and memory.

    Bonus Tip: Additionally, on the Advanced Tab, under Startup and recovery>Settings, you can remotely restart, shut down or log off the computer.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Bonus Tip: Additionally, on the Advanced Tab, under Startup and recovery>Settings, you can remotely restart, shut down or log off the computer.
    Great tip, I've been inside and out of XP for years and I never noticed that before.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • PashPash Member Posts: 1,600 ■■■■■□□□□□
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Wastedtime's solution is the best, but FYI you can do it through computer management as well.

    In ADUC, select the computer and right click, choose Manage. Then at the top left, right click the COMPUTER MANAGEMENT (computer name) and select Properties. Now you can see the make and model, CPU and memory.

    Bonus Tip: Additionally, on the Advanced Tab, under Startup and recovery>Settings, you can remotely restart, shut down or log off the computer.

    Many thanks Mark, ignore what i said before then. Damn my customer site for using Altaris, no AD airtime icon_sad.gif
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    blargoe wrote:
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Bonus Tip: Additionally, on the Advanced Tab, under Startup and recovery>Settings, you can remotely restart, shut down or log off the computer.
    Great tip, I've been inside and out of XP for years and I never noticed that before.

    Okay, one more bonus tip for folks who like to have fun at a co-workers expense:

    From the same place on the Advanced Tab, select the Settings button under Environment Variables. Under System variables, click "New". Under Variable name type the word prompt. Under Variable value type:

    Formatting C: Please wait...

    Watch their eyes pop out next time your co worker opens a cmd prompt. icon_lol.gif
    Everyone I have ever done that to thinks they had a virus.

    PS - It's a harmless trick, it simply changes the cmd prompt text from the default of C:\> or whatever. To change it back to default just delete the variable you created.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • SchluepSchluep Member Posts: 346
    sprkymrk wrote:
    blargoe wrote:
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Bonus Tip: Additionally, on the Advanced Tab, under Startup and recovery>Settings, you can remotely restart, shut down or log off the computer.
    Great tip, I've been inside and out of XP for years and I never noticed that before.

    Okay, one more bonus tip for folks who like to have fun at a co-workers expense:

    From the same place on the Advanced Tab, select the Settings button under Environment Variables. Under System variables, click "New". Under Variable name type the word prompt. Under Variable value type:

    Formatting C: Please wait...

    Watch their eyes pop out next time your co worker opens a cmd prompt. icon_lol.gif
    Everyone I have ever done that to thinks they had a virus.

    PS - It's a harmless trick, it simply changes the cmd prompt text from the default of C:\> or whatever. To change it back to default just delete the variable you created.

    You have no idea how excited I am to try that one out. Best tip I have ever seen posted here.

    Thanks!
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    You don't know what kind of hell you have just unleashed two cubicles down from me
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
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