Getting Into IT

KevyKevy Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi guys i'm new here and i 'm from the UK and currently i'm working for a hotel doing not an interesting job and i have come to a decision to get into IT,I have ZERO experience in this field although i have basic computer skills , I 'm 30yrs old and i consider myself to be good enough to do any course as i have been to A Level equivalent of high schooll in America and done a diploma so my level of understanding is up there,but its just that i have been lazy to be stuck in low paying boring job for several years.

my question what sort of career path shld i take, i wanted to go for the 2 exams route to CNNA or take the A+ and N+ and do you think it will be easy for me to get into the field when i have the certs , i have plenty of time to study
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    Your best might be to start with A+ and Network+, to gauge yourself and see where your skills are, versus what's expected of you. It'll also give you a chance to start doing some hands-on practice with computer hardware, software, and networking equipment. Once you have them, working towards the CCNA is a good idea, or you can look at other certs like Linux+, Server+, the Microsoft path, or any other number of things out there. The best thing you can do, though, seeing as how you have no formal experience in the field, is to make sure that you set up equipment at home to practice with. It doesn't have to be work experience you put on your resume, (but that helps,) you just need to make sure that you've actually used and trained with the technologies you're getting certified on.

    Good luck on your journey, and let us know how you're progressing. Don't be afraid to ask questions, we're always happy to help. If you need any more resources on certs or places to start, (like what books are recommended, how to set up your labs, specific models of routers/switches/servers you need,) I'm sure we can point you in the right direction there as well.

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  • shednikshednik Posts: 2,005Member
    Slowhand wrote:
    Your best might be to start with A+ and Network+, to gauge yourself and see where your skills are, versus what's expected of you. It'll also give you a chance to start doing some hands-on practice with computer hardware, software, and networking equipment. Once you have them, working towards the CCNA is a good idea, or you can look at other certs like Linux+, Server+, the Microsoft path, or any other number of things out there. The best thing you can do, though, seeing as how you have no formal experience in the field, is to make sure that you set up equipment at home to practice with. It doesn't have to be work experience you put on your resume, (but that helps,) you just need to make sure that you've actually used and trained with the technologies you're getting certified on.

    Good luck on your journey, and let us know how you're progressing. Don't be afraid to ask questions, we're always happy to help. If you need any more resources on certs or places to start, (like what books are recommended, how to set up your labs, specific models of routers/switches/servers you need,) I'm sure we can point you in the right direction there as well.

    Slowhand whats the point of anyone else posting when you manage to say it all in 2 paragraphs :D ....haha but anyway defiantly do when you feel will make you happiest, like i say to anyone on here there's a reason we all come here daily because there's so much to learn in our field and it's something i love as well as many other because of that
  • KevyKevy Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I Have been checking loads of other websites about certification and the view that i got is that ,its a total waste of time and money pursuing A+ and N+ , Just wanted to know your honest opinion on this,i have been, i want to get into Networking and i have decided to sit for N+ in March and then take the two way route to CNNA
  • mwgoodmwgood Posts: 293Member
    There's a lot in IT that people say is a "total waste."

    Most of it is not true - it is what you make of it. It all depends where you are - if you look at the curriculum and you are learning about the field - how can it be a "total waste?"

    Start where you are - and just ignore the naysayers.
  • leefdaddyleefdaddy Posts: 405Member
    Kevy wrote:
    I Have been checking loads of other websites about certification and the view that i got is that ,its a total waste of time and money pursuing A+ and N+ , Just wanted to know your honest opinion on this,i have been, i want to get into Networking and i have decided to sit for N+ in March and then take the two way route to CNNA

    While looking for an entry level IT job I think the A+ and Network+ are a great help.
    Dustin Leefers
  • nelnel Posts: 2,859Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    i think slowhand has summed it up just nicely. which area of the UK are you in? whilst you have plenty of time to study i would work out which path you want to take (seems you have already) then go for the exams but make sure you get lots of practical experiance in there as possible. but dont be fooled just because you get your ccna doesnt mean your going to get work easy. i would consider lookiing for an entry level position, just to get some experiance but continue with your study and keep moving.

    have you checked job websites for jobs in your area?

    also if your totally brand new to networking like you say it maybe worth considering taking the ccna academy at your local uni/college. it will cost a few £££'s but is helpful because alot of people underestimate the content of the ccna.
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  • TURTLEGIRLTURTLEGIRL Posts: 361Member
    Definitely A+ to start with and see how you get on from there before you decide on other qualifications. Best of luck icon_cool.gif
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  • SchluepSchluep Posts: 346Member
    Just make sure you are getting into IT for the right reason. If you are looking strictly for higher pay than what you are making at the hotel and saw some big numbers on job boards you may be better of looking to make that much in another field. There are a lot of ways to make similar money, but few require as much effort from what I have seen. Typically when you are involved in IT there will be daily on-going study that is required beyond the certifications in order to stay current in an ever-changing field. Having a genuine interest in networking, hardware, security, or whatever area you end up being involved with is critical to help you stay focused and keep your skills sharp.

    As to the value of entry level certifications, understand that a certification is nothing more than a piece of paper verifying your knowledge of a particular subject area. This is true of everything from A+ to the top Cisco/MS/Security certifications. None of them gaurentee you will have a job in IT because you have the certification. Does that make them all worthless? Of course not. Two candidates with similar experience, backgrounds, and qualifications applying for the same position could really come down to nothing but the certification. At the same time, someone with 25 years experience as a Network Admin with no certifications has a much better chance of landing that new Network Admin position than someone with no experience and their Network+. More importantly than the certification is practicing with and understanding the technology you plan to be certified in. It is one thing to read about a setting up a DMZ for your web server, and another to actually do it.

    Don't let my post discourage you, if you really want to start working in IT you can certainly do so. People much older than yourself have successfully switched to your field and that is certainly not a hindrance. Just understand that we are not just talking about picking up some certifications and automatically making money.

    Once you decide you definitely want to make this move Slowhand has some great suggestions of where to start posted above.
  • MishraMishra Posts: 2,468Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I believe a lot of what you take from the material in certifications is how you are trying to learn it.

    You can't read a book and try to memorize what the book is telling you so you can pass a test. You have to understand the material. Go into learning IT and doing certifications with a hungry for knowledge. That is when a certification is really worth the time. [/u]
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  • jarjarjarjar Posts: 60Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Just my 2 cents. If it doesn't apply, let it fly.

    A+ with no experience = New guy (gal) on my team
    CNNA with no experience = There is no way I am going to hire this guy/gal and let them touch my router/firewall/switches, and since they can't troubleshoot basic computer issues I won't hire them.
  • ThiassiThiassi Posts: 167Member
    I completely agree with jarjar's point above.

    You could skip the entry level exams (A+, N+) and go straight to the MS exams but without any experience no one is going to touch you with a barge poll.

    Personally, I would do both the A+ and N+ apply for some jobs. You'll get a helpdesk role and then study for the higher level exams so you can move onto another job later on with both the qualifications AND experience. You'll then have a load more opportunities.
    ~Thiassi
  • royalroyal Posts: 3,353Member
    Thiassi wrote:
    Personally, I would do both the A+ and N+ apply for some jobs. You'll get a helpdesk role and then study for the higher level exams so you can move onto another job later on with both the qualifications AND experience. You'll then have a load more opportunities.

    I couldn't agree more.
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  • Legacy UserLegacy User Posts: 0Unregistered / Not Logged In ■□□□□□□□□□
    I always recommend that people starting out in the field get the a+, network+ certs. This will give you a strong foundation. Check out my site for free study material for those tests tekshelf.blogspot.com
  • TeslTesl Posts: 87Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    jarjar wrote:
    Just my 2 cents. If it doesn't apply, let it fly.

    A+ with no experience = New guy (gal) on my team
    CNNA with no experience = There is no way I am going to hire this guy/gal and let them touch my router/firewall/switches, and since they can't troubleshoot basic computer issues I won't hire them.

    This post strikes me as a complete waste of space, since it apparently only applies to people working in your particular IT team. Since there are far more IT positions around world wide, and since the odds of him working for you are almost 0, the post above appears absolutely ridiculous.

    To the AP, ignore jarjar unless it is him you really want to work for. His post holds true nowhere else.
  • ThiassiThiassi Posts: 167Member
    Tesl wrote:
    jarjar wrote:
    Just my 2 cents. If it doesn't apply, let it fly.

    A+ with no experience = New guy (gal) on my team
    CNNA with no experience = There is no way I am going to hire this guy/gal and let them touch my router/firewall/switches, and since they can't troubleshoot basic computer issues I won't hire them.

    This post strikes me as a complete waste of space, since it apparently only applies to people working in your particular IT team. Since there are far more IT positions around world wide, and since the odds of him working for you are almost 0, the post above appears absolutely ridiculous.

    To the AP, ignore jarjar unless it is him you really want to work for. His post holds true nowhere else.

    I'm sorry but a little common sense wouldn't go amiss here.

    Jarjar is obviously using an example from his own experience to prove a universal truth. If you have qualifications with no hands on experience to match then no (or very, very few) right minded people will want you using their live environment as a test bench for your newly gained knowledge.

    So what jarjar said DOES make sense and it DOES apply to this thread.

    Your post, on the other hand, is an actual "waste of space",
    ~Thiassi
  • TeslTesl Posts: 87Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thiassi wrote:
    Tesl wrote:
    jarjar wrote:
    Just my 2 cents. If it doesn't apply, let it fly.

    A+ with no experience = New guy (gal) on my team
    CNNA with no experience = There is no way I am going to hire this guy/gal and let them touch my router/firewall/switches, and since they can't troubleshoot basic computer issues I won't hire them.

    This post strikes me as a complete waste of space, since it apparently only applies to people working in your particular IT team. Since there are far more IT positions around world wide, and since the odds of him working for you are almost 0, the post above appears absolutely ridiculous.

    To the AP, ignore jarjar unless it is him you really want to work for. His post holds true nowhere else.

    I'm sorry but a little common sense wouldn't go amiss here.

    Jarjar is obviously using an example from his own experience to prove a universal truth. If you have qualifications with no hands on experience to match then no (or very, very few) right minded people will want you using their live environment as a test bench for your newly gained knowledge.

    So what jarjar said DOES make sense and it DOES apply to this thread.

    Your post, on the other hand, is an actual "waste of space",

    That is NOT a universal truth. What you are saying now is different to his point, which I read as saying that the A+ is effectively more valuable than a CCNA for those looking to get into IT. The A+ being the simplest IT cert you can find and all....

    Maybe I was harsh in hindsight, I apologise.

    I probably need to stop reading these forums though, I can't cope with the overwhelming "Aim Low" attitude that comes across so much...
  • LaminiLamini Posts: 242Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Tesl wrote:
    jarjar wrote:
    Just my 2 cents. If it doesn't apply, let it fly.

    A+ with no experience = New guy (gal) on my team
    CNNA with no experience = There is no way I am going to hire this guy/gal and let them touch my router/firewall/switches, and since they can't troubleshoot basic computer issues I won't hire them.

    This post strikes me as a complete waste of space, since it apparently only applies to people working in your particular IT team. Since there are far more IT positions around world wide, and since the odds of him working for you are almost 0, the post above appears absolutely ridiculous.

    To the AP, ignore jarjar unless it is him you really want to work for. His post holds true nowhere else.

    his thoughts just so happen to line up with my bosses. its a small world? lol. i find it humorous when I have to spend time training network guys how to work with something as simple as a computer (not saying theyre all like that). just because i can set up a raid, i all the sudden become some computer genius, anyone can do that. i think this is another "skip a+/N+/ccna or get real certs" thread, i cant make up my mind myself, i'll just do the ones related. A+ N+ dont expire, they expand your horizon, and more certs cant be bad, more ammo for me. personally, passing the easier ones increases my confidence for the bigger guys. it takes more time, i know. but at the same time, im not focusing to a specific skill, and can apply myself to anything electronics related. so far so good. i dont have a specific skill, but i get on all projects because of my background. this could be bad too... /shrugs i dunno what im saying... back to studying
    CompTIA: A+ / NET+ / SEC+
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  • SmallguySmallguy Posts: 597Member
    I agree with getting your A+ and Network +

    your first job will probalby be help desk or call center oriented

    since your already employed ( I know not happily) but once you achieve your certs why not let your Boss or manager know. they might give you a crack at fixing a few systems around the office if your current IT guy is busy or if you currently bring in a consultant and it could save them some money.

    might aswell try and take advantage of your current employment if it is possiable
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Tesl wrote:
    I probably need to stop reading these forums though, I can't cope with the overwhelming "Aim Low" attitude that comes across so much...

    No offence to you, but if you go back through your posts in the forums many of them are themselves "aim low", so you generally get back what you put in. I remember just recently instead of simply saying something like "I disagree, here is what I think" you called another member a helpdesk lacky.

    And you started this one off pretty low yourself. Rather than just disagreeing with jarjar you called his post a waste of space, ridiculous, and stated that he should be ignored. How low is that? An apology after a harsh post is commendable, but don't start a food fight and then complain when you get hit with an egg.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • TeslTesl Posts: 87Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Tesl wrote:
    I probably need to stop reading these forums though, I can't cope with the overwhelming "Aim Low" attitude that comes across so much...

    No offence to you, but if you go back through your posts in the forums many of them are themselves "aim low", so you generally get back what you put in.

    Not true. Feel free to quote them otherwise.
    I remember just recently instead of simply saying something like "I disagree, here is what I think" you called another member a helpdesk lacky.

    That was blargoe probably.
    And you started this one off pretty low yourself. Rather than just disagreeing with jarjar you called his post a waste of space, ridiculous, and stated that he should be ignored. How low is that? An apology after a harsh post is commendable, but don't start a food fight and then complain when you get hit with an egg.

    I'll apologise again it was worded too harshly. I stand by what I meant though.

    I don't want to get into a rant here, my issue with these boards sometimes is that people seem never willing to encourage people to take a bit of a chance and really go for it. Maybe I don't understand the US market well enough and perhaps that genuinely is the best way to go, but I don't believe it myself. I'm a true "Aim for the stars and you might hit the moon" type of person, its done me *extremely* well in life and think more people should have the confidence to have a crack at the big time.

    Anyways. I will once again apologise to Jarjar for the overly harsh wording, but I stand by what I said.
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    Tesl wrote:
    I don't want to get into a rant here, my issue with these boards sometimes is that people seem never willing to encourage people to take a bit of a chance and really go for it. Maybe I don't understand the US market well enough and perhaps that genuinely is the best way to go, but I don't believe it myself. I'm a true "Aim for the stars and you might hit the moon" type of person, its done me *extremely* well in life and think more people should have the confidence to have a crack at the big time.

    I don't think anyone is suggesting that you should aim low. It's simply the best way to get started. I think pretty much everyone agrees that an A+ and Network+ don't stand on their own, and that they're mainly to develop a foundation for future studies. The pros far outweigh the cons. All he has to put into this is a few months of study and the cost of the exams and study materials. He now has an MCSA elective, a good foundation for the CCNA, and a fairly proficient understanding of hardware. These are lifetime certs that never expire or require recertification. It's just requires a little extra effort up-front in what we all hope is a long and prosperous IT career.

    Also, remember that many resume searches are automated, and a company might just grab all people that have an MCSE and an A+ as opposed to the MCSEs that don't. This is one of the reasons that I'm considering going back and getting an A+. I've been working on PCs since I was 8 (took that 486 from 4mb to 8mb baby!), but I'm not going to put that on my resume. I do mention that I am experienced with that sort of thing, but it would probably be overlooked by someone just glancing at it. We all hope he goes on to that CCIE, but he's got to start somewhere, and I think the consensus is that the A+ and the Network+ are just the ticket.
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Posts: 637Member
    Tesl wrote:
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Tesl wrote:
    I probably need to stop reading these forums though, I can't cope with the overwhelming "Aim Low" attitude that comes across so much...

    No offence to you, but if you go back through your posts in the forums many of them are themselves "aim low", so you generally get back what you put in.

    Not true. Feel free to quote them otherwise.
    I remember just recently instead of simply saying something like "I disagree, here is what I think" you called another member a helpdesk lacky.

    That was blargoe probably.
    And you started this one off pretty low yourself. Rather than just disagreeing with jarjar you called his post a waste of space, ridiculous, and stated that he should be ignored. How low is that? An apology after a harsh post is commendable, but don't start a food fight and then complain when you get hit with an egg.

    I'll apologise again it was worded too harshly. I stand by what I meant though.

    I don't want to get into a rant here, my issue with these boards sometimes is that people seem never willing to encourage people to take a bit of a chance and really go for it. Maybe I don't understand the US market well enough and perhaps that genuinely is the best way to go, but I don't believe it myself. I'm a true "Aim for the stars and you might hit the moon" type of person, its done me *extremely* well in life and think more people should have the confidence to have a crack at the big time.

    Anyways. I will once again apologise to Jarjar for the overly harsh wording, but I stand by what I said.


    Not everyone here promotes "aiming low." If you look back at my posts, I always encourage people to apply, apply, apply. Not everyone has to start off working Tier 1 Help Desk for someone to give them a shot at Systems/Networking related jobs. I have said this plenty of times, and will say it again...someone has given those in those positions an opportunity to excel and learn. How many routers or Servers will get experience with working Tier 1 Help desk? When we all received that first Systems/Networking Administrator position or whatever the title was that came witht he responsibility of managing an entire network, we did not go in with OJT experience because it was a first. We may have had Home Lab or in-classroom lab experience, but we did not have Production environment experience. Even if you were a one man I.T. person for your job and were expected to do some of the high-level stuff, someone gave you the opportunity...they could have hired a contractor who has already setup a multi-site domain and remote capabilities using RRAS, VPN Concentrators, IAS, etc.

    I used my education and certifications to get the interviews, and I had to prove that I was a value during the interview. Convince that hiring manager to give you an opportunity and don't let them down.

    There may be times when you have to settle for a Help Desk job where you might be surrounded by individuals with no certifications, no degree, or even care about I.T. other than a paycheck, while you have CCNA, MCSA, etc., but you shouldn't settle...keep applying until someone gives you a chance to use what you have trained for. Someone will see you as a value especially since they can pay you much lower than an experience guy, and with fresh and updated knowledge, you can be more of an value at a lower cost.

    I will stop ranting now....just 1 cent from my 2 cents :D .
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • KevyKevy Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank you all for your positive contribution ,i really appreciate , i have decided i will take the Computia A+ and N+ in the coming 5months, I'm almost done with the N+,Thanks to Mike Myers Network Passport Book , i'm not really sure whether i shld take Microsoft or the two way route to CNNA, but that has to wait until i pass my Computia exams,I have written to some local isp and hosting services providers asking for a non paid partime Job, maybe once or twice a week, just to gain some experience and to actually see the real thing in action.i knwo its going to be hard to get a job but considering what i'm doing right now, i'm better off with that help desk job

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  • Nik00117Nik00117 Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I think the A+ is like the staple of an IT techs resume.

    I myself have used my A+ to actually get me a lot, i'll be honset I did learn a little bit from it but not much. But it has gotten my internships, which have gotten me references which is a lot better.

    The A+ I think is underrated by a lot of poeple, because when you look at it from a technical side its not that difficult... It really isn't, but what a lot of poeple fail to understand before you get to the 2nd step you gotta go through the 1st.
  • nehalchauhannehalchauhan Posts: 1Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hi

    I am Nehal from Uk, Isle of Wight. I have decided the same and going for N+ and A+ exam. Let me know hw you are studying from which book, Websites etc.

    Regards
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    Hi

    I am Nehal from Uk, Isle of Wight. I have decided the same and going for N+ and A+ exam. Let me know hw you are studying from which book, Websites etc.

    Regards

    Check the A+ and NET+ forums and TechNotes on this site for some good advice and recomendations. Good luck!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • KevyKevy Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    hey guys jusst wanted to let you know about my progress on getting into the filed, i'm on study leave from next week and i will be sitting for Comptia N+ Exams early MARCH Will let you know how it went.
  • ThiassiThiassi Posts: 167Member
    Kevy wrote:
    hey guys jusst wanted to let you know about my progress on getting into the filed, i'm on study leave from next week and i will be sitting for Comptia N+ Exams early MARCH Will let you know how it went.

    All the best with it mate. :)
    ~Thiassi
  • KevyKevy Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    hey guys just came back from the exam and just wanted to share the good news with you, i got a pass 569 bit disappointed i thought i was going to do well , but the good thing its a pass ,considering 3 months ago i didn't know anything about computer networking i'm somehow happy,the big question now is where do i go from here, i 'm thinking of taking the two way route to CNNA and skipping the A+
  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Posts: 515Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Honestly I would start with a little more entry level certs like A+ since you barely passed the CCNA. If you decide to take a CCNA best of luck to you but the difficulty of that test is quite high especially compared to the Network+. It might even discourage you from continuing in IT just because of how difficult and how high of a score you need to pass compared to the Network+.
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