Quick N' Dirty explaination of DRAM/Flash memory

BigToneBigTone Posts: 283Member
I scanned the Cisco Read before you post post and didn't see anything pertaining to this...

My first question is pertaining to a home lab, and then secondly how does DRAM/flash memory affect routers outside in the real world.


I was basically looking to pick up a 2610 from Ciscokits and saw all the different combos 32/8, 64/16, 96/32, etc. and I'm kind of stumped as to what that exactly means. I know I don't need a huge setup for the CCNA but if someone could help me I'd appreciate it.

Comments

  • nice343nice343 Posts: 391Member
    memory determines the kind of IOS the router runs.

    Newer IOS and voice routers require a lot of memory. If you have a router with a small memory, Chances is are it will not have the latest IOS and some advanced features
    My daily blog about IT and tech stuff
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  • BigToneBigTone Posts: 283Member
    well according to Ciscokits all of their routers have the 12.3.24 OS on them...from the cheaper 70 dollar version to the $200+ ones
  • nice343nice343 Posts: 391Member
    BigTone wrote:
    well according to Ciscokits all of their routers have the 12.3.24 OS on them...from the cheaper 70 dollar version to the $200+ ones

    any router with an IOS version of 12.3 is good enough for a CCNA
    My daily blog about IT and tech stuff
    http://techintuition.com/
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    The flash stores the IOS image while the DRAM is the working memory, just like in a computer. You need your flash large enough to store the IOS you're going to work with. You can check the requirements for various IOS versions here: http://tools.cisco.com/ITDIT/CFN/jsp/index.jsp

    You might have a little more flexibility with the DRAM. Your lab routers aren't going to be worked as hard as routers in live environments, so you might be able to skimp a bit.
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