Some Net+ Questions

itrorevitrorev Junior MemberMember Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi guys,

I have some questions that need clarifying:

Gateways vs Routers

From what I understand, a router is always a gateway, but a gateway may not be a router. Additionaly, gateways allow access to a dissimilar networks (i.e. different OS or archetecture, etc), whereas a router just allows access to a similar network, one with the same OS or archetecture.

Am I right?


Also, I ran into a question on a practice exam that suggested that to connect a switch to a cable or dsl modem, you would need a crossover cable. I initially assumed this question was just blatanly incorrect. But given some further thinking, I thought it may actually be correct given that a dsl/cable modem is actually not a modem at all, but a layer 2 device (thus related to a switch, or so I think)

What is your guys thoughts?

Comments

  • aordalaordal Pissed Member Posts: 372
    Here's my thoughts on your questions.
    From what I understand, a router is always a gateway, but a gateway may not be a router.
    Correct. Just make sure you arent confusing gateway with default gateway.
    Additionaly, gateways allow access to a dissimilar networks (i.e. different OS or archetecture, etc), whereas a router just allows access to a similar network, one with the same OS or archetecture.

    Wrong. A router will route the traffic no matter where it's coming from. This is how you can have a MAC and Windows on your same wireless network at home and still get on the internet. Granted they are both using tcp/ip they are different OS which doesnt matter to the router. When you say architecture I assume you mean protocol ie one computer using ipx/spx while another is using tcp/ip. The router will route any routeable protocol to its intended destination. Whether or not the destination is able to read the packets is beyond the job of a router.
    Also, I ran into a question on a practice exam that suggested that to connect a switch to a cable or dsl modem, you would need a crossover cable. I initially assumed this question was just blatanly incorrect. But given some further thinking, I thought it may actually be correct given that a dsl/cable modem is actually not a modem at all, but a layer 2 device (thus related to a switch, or so I think)

    I havn't done a lot of research on this one. But I know for a fact that my cable modem at home connects directly to a switch using a standard patch cable. So based on my real life experience I would say that is incorrect.
  • KikodeKikode Member Member Posts: 74 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I don't know if this help much but from my studies I learned that unless the port has a MDIX label you don't need a crossover cable and can use straight through cabling. From what I read the MDIX means the device doesn't do the crossover function inside the unit, and MDI means it does. Also some devices will have a switch on the unit so you can switch between MDIX and MDI.
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