Can BA in Economics and BA in Media be helpful?

ArveanArvean Member Posts: 87 ■■□□□□□□□□
Well I'm finished with my associate in Computer Management, and I've made some steps toward obtaining BA. I decided to go with double major in Economics and Media. My motivation was to broaden my horizons and increase my chances to in future career. From I have around 2 years of desktop support/light network admin experience, 4 years as a graphic designer ( that's why I seleceted media as my second major) and now I'm an office manager/technical admin for a small office. I need your opinion on following:

a) Am I decreasing my chances in IT field by going for Economics and Media other than CS? ( i'm willing to still pursue current IT certs)

b) Will that variety of skills help me in obtaining the dream job or will it just show my potential employers that I must be not worth it, cause I'm not a specialist in one particular field

c) Is Security+
MCSA
MCSE good track to follow in the nearest future?


Every thought will be highly appreciated...
No trees were killed in the posting of this message. However a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    a) Any BA/BS degree will look good on a resume. It shows you can commit to something and follow through until completion. Economics will definitely be useful if you decide to go for an MBA and move into management later on. The media probably won't do anything special for you, but it's not going to hurt you. If you find it interesting, add it on.

    TBH, most four-year CSci programs are exclusively programming, so unless you want to go in that direction, those won't do more for you than economics or media. Any BS in networking you come across will likely just be classes that just get you certs. There was one around here that was something like $15-20k/year, and it was basically just the MS track. While that BS might look good on your resume (at least until they look at your coursework), you won't really be any better off than you would be had you just self-studied. It's rare to find a good networking program that includes other liberal arts classes and actually gives you a well-rounded degree (though I've seen a few pop up recently).

    b) A lot of places look for people that have good people/soft skills. IMHO, you'll definitely be better off if you have speech, literature, psychology, etc. added into the mix than if you would have simply dedicated yourself to a technical degree. You certs will back up your technical knowledge.

    c) Yes.
  • girt81girt81 Member Posts: 14 ■□□□□□□□□□
    a) You'd possibly be hurting your chances with a larger organization by not specializing in the classic IT fields. Certs and experience can help to offset that however. For a small to medium sized business that will need you to have a broad skill set, it could be a benefit. Those aren't absolutes in any sense, as hiring practices differ between organizations.

    b) Again it could go either way, but the certs and relevant experience should be enough to get you in the door for an interview in a lot of places. From there it's just what you actually know and how you sell yourself.

    c) IMO it is. I'm biased though because it's what I'm currently working on icon_lol.gif
    In progress: IINS (CCNA Security)
  • puertorico123puertorico123 Member Posts: 95 ■■□□□□□□□□
    my opinion is to make a MBA than a double degree in a same undergraduade degree.
    example, BA in media + MBA in economic and manager, but if you have experencie in IT a good choice is MBA in IT manager. and later a PhD in media or bussiness.(experencie + PhD = a good posicion teacher in a university).
    HOLD:
    Comptia A+
    Comptia Network+

    2009 Plan:
    MCSA...75%
    CCENT....0%
    70-648..0%

    2010 Plan:
    MCITP
    ORACLE
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    My thought is rarely does the major of your undergrad field matter (unless you want to be an architect, engineer, or an accountant, etc..). For example, I know many highly successful IT people that have BA's in philosophy or other seemingly unrelated subjects.

    Instead, my thought has always been that you don't want to have to explain to someone the school where you received your degree. Don't underestimate....school name/reputation goes a long way on a resume.

    As mentioned, simply completing any degree program is a plus as well.

    MS
  • brad-brad- Member Posts: 1,218
    eMeS wrote:
    My thought is rarely does the major of your undergrad field matter (unless you want to be an architect, engineer, or an accountant, etc..). For example, I know many highly successful IT people that have BA's in philosophy or other seemingly unrelated subjects.

    Instead, my thought has always been that you don't want to have to explain to someone the school where you received your degree. Don't underestimate....school name/reputation goes a long way on a resume.

    As mentioned, simply completing any degree program is a plus as well.

    MS
    +1

    B.S. for the most part just says you're willing to stick with something, not quit, you've been judged to a standard, and you're teachable. It will never hurt you, but I dont think its as necessary in the IT world as experience and/or certs.
  • Vogon PoetVogon Poet Member Posts: 291
    eMeS wrote:
    My thought is rarely does the major of your undergrad field matter (unless you want to be an architect, engineer, or an accountant, etc..)
    100% correct.
    Hiring types will be biased toward candidates with degrees. Keep in mind that many organizations may not just be filling an empty position, but also looking for someone who can be promoted to other jobs in the future.
    No matter how paranoid you are, you're not paranoid enough.
Sign In or Register to comment.