Lowered Salary offered during Interview?!

SepiraphSepiraph Member Posts: 179 ■■□□□□□□□□
So recently I had an interview for a networking job, and the interview went well except near the end when the director of the company (small company) mentioned that they can't match my salary expectation. Nevertheless to say, I was NOT impressed since I specifically told the HR recruiter in the previous interview that I wont consider anything below what I stated. icon_evil.gif But I guess she did NOT communicate with the company properly.

Have any of you guys encounter similar experiences? For me this was the first time that I got low-balled... I am prepared now that in the future, I'll just kindly thank the interviewers and tell them that "I am sure you'd hire some good people, but I don't think I'm interested working at that salary".

Comments

  • sprinkl3ssprinkl3s Member Posts: 92 ■■□□□□□□□□
    How far below your salary expectation were they?

    You may be able to negotiate other forms of compensation aside from salary. There was one position that I interviewed for and I was asking for $22 an hour, they could only offer me $19 an hour. They told me they really wanted me and I felt I would benefit greatly from the position. So I negotiated a little bit and they agree to give me an extra 40 hours of PDO and a 9k training allowance on top of paying for certs. They would also allow me to work from home once a week.

    For me the $19 an hour in addition to the extra negotiated benefits it was worth my while. Even just getting to work from home once a week was a great benefit.
  • seuss_ssuesseuss_ssues Member Posts: 629
    Negotiation the salary is one of the more difficult aspects of the hiring process. Only you can determine what you think your worth and you cant blame the hiring company for trying to get an experienced employee at a lower wage. But unless i was getting into a career that I enjoyed more than my current profession or if it would give me invaluable experience and a short track to move up then i wouldnt take it.
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    Negotiation the salary is one of the more difficult aspects of the hiring process. Only you can determine what you think your worth and you cant blame the hiring company for trying to get an experienced employee at a lower wage. But unless i was getting into a career that I enjoyed more than my current profession or if it would give me invaluable experience and a short track to move up then i wouldnt take it.

    Well said...

    Generally, accepting less than you are worth is the first step to an unfulfilling employer-employee relationship.

    From your perspective, you won't be able to concentrate 100% on the new job because you'll be looking for one that pays what you feel you are worth. From your employer's perspective, they're going to lose you the minute you find a job that does pay you what you're worth.

    Lose-Lose IMO
  • SRTMCSESRTMCSE Member Posts: 249
    I had a similar experience with my current job (haven't started yet but accepted the offer). It's an overnite position (12AM-8AM) but awesome environment. I already had an offer from a consulting firm for $65k so I was asking for $82k. The recruiter came back with $70k and I told him clearly I wouldn't do it for less than $80k. We came to a great agreement, that since it was a night shift and they were having a hard time filling the position, they'd pay me base $70k and a $10k bonus annually ($5k every 6 months) so long as I maintained the night shift.

    So sometimes it's easier for a company accounting wise to work in another form of compensation. The recruiter explained that although compensation to me was the same it somehow worked out for them for budgeting reasons or something.

    So maybe you can explain to them the situation and request some kind of goal or time based bonus opportunity.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I have had some similar experiences with going through a hiring company. I think it is most likely that the hiring company either dropped the ball with the communication or they out and out lied to one or both of you and the company by misrepresentation expectations. The hiring agencies are out to get as many placements as possible as quickly as possible and landing interviews is the only way they have a chance. It probably isn't the fault of the company looking to fill a position.

    With my current position there was a miscommunication (at best, or purposeful misrepresentation from the recruiter maybe) on salary expectations and whether the position would be temp to perm or a direct hire. When it came down to it I completed the interviews because I was interested in the job, but talked to the HR person I was in contact with about what happened and she tried to do everything she could to lure me in (like paying for my COBRA expenses entirely during the waiting period for insurance, for example). In the end I held out, and eventually, they called me back with the original rate of pay that had been advertised by the recruiter.

    In short, don't take less than the range of what you are really worth. In doing so don't forget to add in the value of all the perks that the job may have to offer like training classes and working from home.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
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  • SepiraphSepiraph Member Posts: 179 ■■□□□□□□□□
    sprinkl3s wrote:
    How far below your salary expectation were they?

    You may be able to negotiate other forms of compensation aside from salary. There was one position that I interviewed for and I was asking for $22 an hour, they could only offer me $19 an hour. They told me they really wanted me and I felt I would benefit greatly from the position. So I negotiated a little bit and they agree to give me an extra 40 hours of PDO and a 9k training allowance on top of paying for certs. They would also allow me to work from home once a week.

    For me the $19 an hour in addition to the extra negotiated benefits it was worth my while. Even just getting to work from home once a week was a great benefit.
    The initial job posting gave a range in terms of salary and I asked at the upper range. They mention they can only pay at the mid-range, which was below what I was asking for by 5k. While it'd still be above what I am currently getting at my job, the after-tax gross would be about even since I currently work as a contractor and have much more tax write-off while that job I would not be.
    eMeS wrote:
    Well said...

    Generally, accepting less than you are worth is the first step to an unfulfilling employer-employee relationship.

    From your perspective, you won't be able to concentrate 100% on the new job because you'll be looking for one that pays what you feel you are worth. From your employer's perspective, they're going to lose you the minute you find a job that does pay you what you're worth.

    Lose-Lose IMO
    You are right, it'd most likely lead to an fulfilling relationship because right away the company's action failed to meet my expectation, and it is telling me that they would most likely do so in the future. While employers are interviewing employees, as an employee I'm also interviewing the employer. Thus I am already working for a much larger and reputable company than that small compnay so I'm not desperate for their job.

    Anyway, I liked the suggestion about negotiating and I'll keep it in mind. After this experience I'm definitely more prepared in the future. Also I'm be a lot clear from the beginning that my salary expectation is not negotiable so I dont end up wasting my time.
  • livenliven Member Posts: 918
    blargoe wrote:
    I have had some similar experiences with going through a hiring company. I think it is most likely that the hiring company either dropped the ball with the communication or they out and out lied to one or both of you and the company by misrepresentation expectations. The hiring agencies are out to get as many placements as possible as quickly as possible and landing interviews is the only way they have a chance. It probably isn't the fault of the company looking to fill a position.

    With my current position there was a miscommunication (at best, or purposeful misrepresentation from the recruiter maybe) on salary expectations and whether the position would be temp to perm or a direct hire. When it came down to it I completed the interviews because I was interested in the job, but talked to the HR person I was in contact with about what happened and she tried to do everything she could to lure me in (like paying for my COBRA expenses entirely during the waiting period for insurance, for example). In the end I held out, and eventually, they called me back with the original rate of pay that had been advertised by the recruiter.

    In short, don't take less than the range of what you are really worth. In doing so don't forget to add in the value of all the perks that the job may have to offer like training classes and working from home.

    BUMP!!!

    My wife is a recruiter. She helped me realize this kind of stuff.

    Its all a big game and you just got to stick to your guns.
    encrypt the encryption, never mind my brain hurts.
  • undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    Some other pieces of advice I have found is to avoid giving your salary history. Then you'll lose pretty much all hope of getting what you are looking for and it really isn't any of their business anyhow. Also figure out what you want and what your minimum is. Ask for what you want but don't go below your minimum. Also try to get them to give you a range first, instead of you making the first offer. Don't be afraid to walk away from the table. Sadly it is a lot like shopping for a car.


    Oh, and definitely definitely definitely get it all in writing before you sign. I've seen (and experienced) companies that have a bit of "forgetfulness."
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
  • dtlokeedtlokee Member Posts: 2,378 ■■■■□□□□□□
    undomiel wrote:
    Some other pieces of advice I have found is to avoid giving your salary history

    Some companies require you to provide a verifiable salary history. Why? Because when they ask the question "why did you (or are you looking to) leave your last job?" Do you answer "because I want a 15,000 per year bump and this is the only way it will happen."? Probably not if you want the job, you'll go with the "I want more challenges" or some such answer when in the back of your mind you're really trying to get a 15k bump. If the job pays that much more than what you're making right now, you are most likely under qualified for it.

    Also make sure you are specific on the salary, I had a student who asked for "40". He was hired and when he got his first paycheck he was disappointed in the fact that they were paying him $40,000 a year and he wanted $40/hour. Tht is a big difference.
    The only easy day was yesterday!
  • MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    dtlokee wrote:

    Also make sure you are specific on the salary, I had a student who asked for "40". He was hired and when he got his first paycheck he was disappointed in the fact that they were paying him $40,000 a year and he wanted $40/hour. Tht is a big difference.

    Woooow. I bet "disappointed" isn't the word he was shouting for weeks.
    My blog http://www.calegp.com

    You may learn something!
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    I think that's his own stupid fault...I mean, seriously? A student wants $40/hr?!?! That equates to over 80K annually....just another tech-wanna-be who thinks IT will him 6 figures in 5 years or less......somethings actually take work to earn, especially money......
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • dtlokeedtlokee Member Posts: 2,378 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Ricka182 wrote:
    I think that's his own stupid fault...I mean, seriously? A student wants $40/hr?!?! That equates to over 80K annually....just another tech-wanna-be who thinks IT will him 6 figures in 5 years or less......somethings actually take work to earn, especially money......

    Many of my students have 6-10 years of experience, just not in the area of salary negotiation.

    I forget how much this guy had, but he was not a noob.
    The only easy day was yesterday!
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Member Posts: 3,359
    Ok, so point given and understood. But this guy had experience, but couldn't figure out how to explain or understand what "40" means........not to mention, how many jobs that pay that much, actually pay by the hour anyway??
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • SchluepSchluep Member Posts: 346
    Ricka182 wrote:
    Ok, so point given and understood. But this guy had experience, but couldn't figure out how to explain or understand what "40" means........not to mention, how many jobs that pay that much, actually pay by the hour anyway??

    Frequently contract and bill for time type positions can be higher than that and paid by the hour.
    Mishra wrote:
    Woooow. I bet "disappointed" isn't the word he was shouting for weeks.

    Care to elaborate? icon_silent.gif
  • dtlokeedtlokee Member Posts: 2,378 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I wasn't trying to start a debate, it was just a stupid mistake on his part. I just threw it out there so no one else would make a similar mistake when agreeing to salary terms.
    The only easy day was yesterday!
  • KasorKasor Member Posts: 929 ■■■■□□□□□□
    move on to different job... you deserve better. Sometime HR and those company don't know what they ask for and that why they never get the right people for the right job.
    Kill All Suffer T "o" ReBorn
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