Just passed this last week, but I thought this was odd...

barhormdbarhormd Member Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
I realize there is a rule about not posting direct questions, so I'll be as vague as possible. However, there was a question about installation of RAS on a Windows NT 4.0 workstation. I haven't touched a NT machine in probably 6 years, and I work for a huge enterprise. I thought this was a bit ridiculous. Or am I off-base?

Comments

  • 7255carl7255carl Member Posts: 1,544 ■■■□□□□□□□
    congrats on the pass :D , i had some very odd stuff on my exam too, looking back over past posts, it seems network+ is quite famous for it.
    W.I.P CCNA Cyber Ops
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    7255carl wrote:
    congrats on the pass :D , i had some very odd stuff on my exam too, looking back over past posts, it seems network+ is quite famous for it.

    Yes i remember it being a very quirky exam, but hey you passed so thats what matters congrats icon_thumright.gif
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    That's how they getcha. The CompTIA exams, along with any other vendor-neutral exams, tend to cast a pretty wide net in terms of what technologies they test you on. Sometimes it's NT4 on 10mps Ethernet, sometimes it's Red Enterprise Linux 5 running on 10Gb Ethernet, and sometimes it's completely out of left-field with something oddball like token-ring or thinnet. They want to make sure you get some basic knowledge of what could be out there, as well as give you a brief "history of" some of the concepts.

    Congrats on the pass, what's up next for you?

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  • barhormdbarhormd Member Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote:
    That's how they getcha. The CompTIA exams, along with any other vendor-neutral exams, tend to cast a pretty wide net in terms of what technologies they test you on. Sometimes it's NT4 on 10mps Ethernet, sometimes it's Red Enterprise Linux 5 running on 10Gb Ethernet, and sometimes it's completely out of left-field with something oddball like token-ring or thinnet. They want to make sure you get some basic knowledge of what could be out there, as well as give you a brief "history of" some of the concepts.

    Congrats on the pass, what's up next for you?

    I just bought the Syngress Security+ book last night, and I just ordered the Sybex book yesterday for like 12 bucks used on barnesandnoble. So, hopefully I'll be taking the Security+ exam in the next 4-6 weeks.

    Edit: apparently, they retired the inet+ exam. I was going to do that next. I guess I'll do Server+ next or maybe a Microsoft one.
  • Megadeth4168Megadeth4168 Member Posts: 2,157
    The network+ did have some obscure questions on it, but for the most part it was straight forward.
    I think you will find the Security+ to be even more straight forward but most likely more difficult. I found the Security+ to be quite a challenge.

    Congrats on the pass and good luck on the future exams.
  • AnwardAnward Member Posts: 73 ■■■□□□□□□□
    congratz on the pass!!!
    Remember that when things seems to be going against you, remember that the plane takes off against the wind and not with it
  • NetwurkNetwurk Member Posts: 1,155 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Congrats on the pass.

    The Net+ seemed to be very current when I took it (2003). But I've heard of a lot of people getting tested on things like NT and Novell, which is rarely encountered these days. Anyhow, you passed.
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