What should I do next? Fresh Outta High School

RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
1. Where is a good networking/computer(want to go into networking) school to goto? i.e community,technical,university's

2. What certifications should I go for? Have MCP 70-270, working on Net+ June 3rd

Thx
12/31/89 n00b?
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Comments

  • nicklauscombsnicklauscombs Member Posts: 885
    1. For schooling money really is the deciding factor, community college/university obviously provides you with a degree which is highly respected but can put you in some serious debt after graduation, on the other hand technical schools are cheaper and usually train towards certifications which can help you get your foot in the door quicker if you want to start working asap.

    2. Net+ is a good start, i'd suggest getting A+ and Security+ as well to provide a good foundation. After that go for certifications for technology you want to work with i.e. Microsoft certs if you want to be a windows admin, cisco certs if you want to work with routers and switches, etc...
    WIP: IPS exam
  • undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    What is it you are looking to do with your job life ultimately?
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
  • RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Yea Im working on my Net+ right now b/c itll get me an A+ in the class, just like my MCP did the year before(same class, diff subjects..) A+ cert from what ive heard is a class A+ Joke icon_rolleyes.gif

    Thx for the comment more please :D
    12/31/89 n00b?
  • Mmartin_47Mmartin_47 Member Posts: 430
    I'm with you dude... Same here out of high school (2006). I think do your MCSE with CCNA.

    As for me I'm just sticking to MCSE. Probably going to work as help desk for my first IT job since I have no previous work experience at all.

    At the same time after receiving MCSE, while working planning to attend DeVry University for my bachelors in networking/communications management. Bachelor's in 2 years (since classes are only 8 weeks long).
  • RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I What is it you are looking to do with your job life ultimately?
    I plan on going into the networking field of any kind, MS, Cisco ect.. And I want to make good living. Im growing up in a divorce were we nice but money is tight(no bad reasons) and I dont want that when I move out, and I want to move up in my field until I get to the top!
    12/31/89 n00b?
  • RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Yea dude, I have 0 work exp, unless you count my computer technician job i made for myself ;p, and devry just called me an hour ago... and told me about the 2 year bach.
    12/31/89 n00b?
  • undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    College isn't really worth the debt, in my personal opinion. Go and get into the job force immediately and get yourself some experience. Get a help desk job or a desktop support so that you're getting experience and income. If you're able to afford college without loans then by all means go for it. Otherwise stick to getting experience and working on certifications. A+ will help you get your foot in the door for your entry level help desk/desktop support jobs. Since you're interested in networking the CCNA would probably be for you. Go for a start with that.
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
  • wheelywheely Member Posts: 105
    I can tell you from personal experience because it is happening to me now. It is hard to find a job with no experience. I have no "real" IT work experience other than family, friends, etc....

    I went straight from high school to college and got a 2 year degree in computer networking. I took about 6 months off after graduating college because I was burnt out. I have my A+, Net+, Security+ and a 2 year degree and currently going after my MCSA/E but even with all that I have yet to find any work.

    So again I say it is going to be hard as hell to find a job with no experience.
  • RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 5:10 pm Post subject:
    I can tell you from personal experience because it is happening to me now. It is hard to find a job with no experience. I have no "real" IT work experience other than family, friends, etc....

    I went straight from high school to college and got a 2 year degree in computer networking. I took about 6 months off after graduating college because I was burnt out. I have my A+, Net+, Security+ and a 2 year degree and currently going after my MCSA/E but even with all that I have yet to find any work.

    So again I say it is going to be hard as hell to find a job with no experience.

    Well the future looks bright then.... icon_eek.gif
    12/31/89 n00b?
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    undomiel wrote:
    College isn't really worth the debt, in my personal opinion.

    I disagree with that completely MANY companies require that or a lot of experience to make up for it. Don't get me wrong experience is king in this situation but having a BS degree will help you waive a few years experience. While in college though I strongly recommend finding internships over summer breaks and a part time job during the semester to add some experience. The job i got out of college would have never happened if it hadn't been for my degree, and for a good percentage of jobs you need a degree of some sort to even work help desk. It's very tough to break into the field without degree has been my experience well at least a job worth while. My personal recommendation is always go get a bachelors for the experience and knowledge. If you don't want to pursue a 4 year degree now though just be cautious about the 2 year programs I know a lot of technical schools credits don't transfer if you go back for your bachelors. Trust me I've seen people 5 years older then me with only an AS degree still making under 14/hr and looking for anything better then what they had at my last job. I left with me BS, 2 years experience, the certs I have currently, and landed a job at 46k at the age of 22. In my area thats a nice salary for someone as young as me, which is why I'm such an advocate for education and experience at the same time.

    my 2 cents :)
  • RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    That sounds like the perfect game plan I want, may have to just pull a Bill Belichick spy-gate on ya :D

    Do you recommend any schools? Also should I go to a community college to get basics out of the way such as math and science? Cause I seriously have no clue how this college thing works, I ignorantly have not met with any counslers, from what I gather people goto CC for two years to get the "basics" out of the way, then I assume you transfer some where to go for your major?

    Also I wanna Major in a Networking Area and Minor in business Area, as you can see I know my terms -_-

    Thanks for the help so far everyone Ill keep login on to see if there is any more post.
    12/31/89 n00b?
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    RapidFire wrote:
    That sounds like the perfect game plan I want, may have to just pull a Bill Belichick spy-gate on ya :D

    Do you recommend any schools? Also should I go to a community college to get basics out of the way such as math and science? Cause I seriously have no clue how this college thing works, I ignorantly have not met with any counslers, from what I gather people goto CC for two years to get the "basics" out of the way, then I assume you transfer some where to go for your major?

    Also I wanna Major in a Networking Area and Minor in business Area, as you can see I know my terms -_-

    Thanks for the help so far everyone Ill keep login on to see if there is any more post.

    Well it all depends on where you live honestly take a look at the programs. if you want to save some money starting out a community college can be beneficial I'd check to see how good their technology program is though. If I had known that my local community college was good I would've started there but I went straight to the university. Also I think going away to school is something most people should do, let you experience life on your own to a point. I know I needed it at the time I left for school. Where are you from in Michigan? I know a lot of schools do have a Networking concentration for their degrees.
  • RapidFireRapidFire Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Flint Area, Genesee County
    12/31/89 n00b?
  • cablegodcablegod Member Posts: 294
    RapidFire wrote:
    Yea Im working on my Net+ right now b/c itll get me an A+ in the class, just like my MCP did the year before(same class, diff subjects..) A+ cert from what ive heard is a class A+ Joke icon_rolleyes.gif

    Thx for the comment more please :D

    Since you are interested in certs.... Go check out wgu.edu

    You get your BS plus about nine certifications depending on the track you choose.
    “Government is a disease masquerading as its own cure.” -Robert LeFevre
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    WGU is an option if you want to go the online route... I'd look at some of the state schools I don't know much about Michigan's Universities...maybe if dynamik catches this page is his auto-refresh that he has going on icon_lol.gif He'd be a good person to talk to about it I know he's taking classes to finish his bachelors somewhere. Other than that I'd talk to faculty at school, or start at community college like you said. I know in my county they have joint programs with local universities where you do your first 2 years there and then move to the university for the final 2, something to consider.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    To answer the topic question, I've got three words: go to school.

    The job-market is tough, and quite frankly, you'll end up regretting not going now. Even if you only decide to get a two-year degree, that will help you greatly. Certifications are one thing, you can study for them as you go or after you're done, but school is going to be the difference between relying on luck to get a job, and actually being qualified.

    Do some research on what schools you have in your area, do a Google search if you have to, include the name of your town/county/state, along with keywords of your major, like CIS. As others have mentioned, you can focus on a networking or sysadmin-centered degree, which may even get you some certifications as you go.

    Whatever you choose to do, just remember, 90% of IT jobs list a Bachelor's degree as a requirement. You may be able to replace that with an Associate's degree and experience, but it's VERY tough to find a decent-paying job without some kind of formal education. There's always going to be countless people out there with the trifecta: a Bachelor's degree, experience, and certs. You need every edge you can get, especially if you should ever decide to go for a management position or that you want to change profession.

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  • mengo17mengo17 Member Posts: 100 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote:
    To answer the topic question, I've got three words: go to school.

    The job-market is tough, and quite frankly, you'll end up regretting not going now. Even if you only decide to get a two-year degree, that will help you greatly. Certifications are one thing, you can study for them as you go or after you're done, but school is going to be the difference between relying on luck to get a job, and actually being qualified.

    Do some research on what schools you have in your area, do a Google search if you have to, include the name of your town/county/state, along with keywords of your major, like CIS. As others have mentioned, you can focus on a networking or sysadmin-centered degree, which may even get you some certifications as you go.

    Whatever you choose to do, just remember, 90% of IT jobs list a Bachelor's degree as a requirement. You may be able to replace that with an Associate's degree and experience, but it's VERY tough to find a decent-paying job without some kind of formal education. There's always going to be countless people out there with the trifecta: a Bachelor's degree, experience, and certs. You need every edge you can get, especially if you should ever decide to go for a management position or that you want to change profession.

    +1
  • sir_creamy_sir_creamy_ Inactive Imported Users Posts: 298
    undomiel wrote:
    College isn't really worth the debt, in my personal opinion. Go and get into the job force immediately and get yourself some experience. Get a help desk job or a desktop support so that you're getting experience and income. If you're able to afford college without loans then by all means go for it. Otherwise stick to getting experience and working on certifications. A+ will help you get your foot in the door for your entry level help desk/desktop support jobs. Since you're interested in networking the CCNA would probably be for you. Go for a start with that.

    icon_rolleyes.gif
    Bachelor of Computer Science

    [Forum moderators are my friends]
  • undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    undomiel wrote:
    College isn't really worth the debt, in my personal opinion. Go and get into the job force immediately and get yourself some experience. Get a help desk job or a desktop support so that you're getting experience and income. If you're able to afford college without loans then by all means go for it. Otherwise stick to getting experience and working on certifications. A+ will help you get your foot in the door for your entry level help desk/desktop support jobs. Since you're interested in networking the CCNA would probably be for you. Go for a start with that.

    icon_rolleyes.gif

    You're more than welcome to not like my advice, I know it comes from the unpopular side of the tracks.
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
  • SieSie Member Posts: 1,195
    Personally the best idea is to learn and go to school / obtain certifications while your working then you get the best of both worlds.

    It really depends on your situation if you do that or not, personally I would steer more towards school/colledge/university and if you can afford to work part time or for a charity etc you can gain invalueable experience whilst you learn.

    I went to work and whilst I can see the benefits of gaining that experience I do still wish I had done more schooling before now and am currently making up for lost time whilst working.

    So my 2p's worth? Do both if you can!!
    Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools
  • chombergchomberg Member Posts: 8 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I agree that college can put you in serious debt, but worth it in the long run. Start with some CompTIA certs and try to find a community college. At least they will not be as expensive.
  • snadamsnadam Member Posts: 2,234 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Having just helped my wife finish her BS degree at a university, I will say YES college is very expensive!

    That being said, it really all depends on what your situation is. You can afford college then go for it like undomiel said. If you cant afford it yet, then look into getting your feet wet in the field and grabbing some certs, and maybe an internship or something first. Hit up your junior college and see how far you want to take an associates degree in the field. If you really want to continue, then finish your AAS and get moving on to the university.

    I think the point undomiel was trying to make is spending ~$5k/semester on something you're unsure of is A LOT OF FREAKING money only to find out you don't want to go that route. I think obtaining a college degree is only necessary if you are sure that you want to get into the field, otherwise it IS a waste of your money and time.
    **** ARE FOR CHUMPS! Don't be a chump! Validate your material with certguard.com search engine

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  • filkenjitsufilkenjitsu CCNA R&S, CCNA SP Member Posts: 561 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Join the Airforce and go IT or communications.

    Serve 4 years, get in shape, work 4 years as a communications tech or IT tech, let them pay for school, get out if you dont like it, and you are set!
    CISSP, CCNA SP
    Bachelors of Science in Telecommunications - Mt. Sierra College
    Masters of Networking and Communications Management, Focus in Wireless - Keller
  • Vassago68Vassago68 Member Posts: 49 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Mmartin_47 wrote:
    I'm with you dude... Same here out of high school (2006). I think do your MCSE with CCNA.

    As for me I'm just sticking to MCSE. Probably going to work as help desk for my first IT job since I have no previous work experience at all.

    At the same time after receiving MCSE, while working planning to attend DeVry University for my bachelors in networking/communications management. Bachelor's in 2 years (since classes are only 8 weeks long).

    Id say that this is a good start. I am going through DeVry right now and halfway to my Computer Information Systems degree. Also while I am over here in Iraq I am studying for my CCNA, and then after I test for that in a few months in Bagdad, I will start working on my MCSE.

    I figure after I get out of the Army in 3 years, I will have my degree (working on my masters by then), CCNA, Net+, A+, Sec+, MCSE, and working on either my CCNP or CCSP.
  • jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
    I would "Party" icon_cool.gificon_cool.gificon_cool.gif
  • lildeezullildeezul Member Posts: 404
    sorry to bring up an old topic..

    but i am in the same boat as you..

    the diffreence is that i am a sohpmore going to be a junior in high school.. I scheduled my exam for tommorow at 1. and plan to get an intern with the John Deere/Hitachi company
    NHSCA National All-American Wrestler 135lb
  • oo_snoopyoo_snoopy Member Posts: 124
    Not to be harsh but shouldn't you have already planned out/applied/been accepted to a college by now?
    I used to run the internet.
  • goforthbmerrygoforthbmerry Member Posts: 244
    Experience will really help you get that first job no matter what you decide to do. Unless you really want to join the military (great job experience and a real door opener) I would seriously look for any volunteer opportunities you can find. See if there are any computer or IT professional cluba in your area. Check out Culminus for a start (you can google it if my spelling is correct). They often have service opportunities that will show employers that you have actually touched equipment and done things in the real world. The real world is not like the books.

    I think that will really help set you apart from other candidates.
    Going for MCSE:security, Intermediate ITIL, PMP
  • FluxCapacitorFluxCapacitor Member Posts: 40 ■■□□□□□□□□
    As far as good schools for Computer Networking go in Michigan, I would say, Check out Davenport University. They have majors for Computer Networking, Network Security, Computer Information systems, and they just made a Masters program in Information Assurance.

    http://www.davenport.edu/

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  • sthomassthomas Member Posts: 1,240 ■■■□□□□□□□
    lildeezul wrote:
    sorry to bring up an old topic..

    but i am in the same boat as you..

    the diffreence is that i am a sohpmore going to be a junior in high school.. I scheduled my exam for tommorow at 1. and plan to get an intern with the John Deere/Hitachi company

    It sounds like you are off to a very good start. Are you taking the CCNA or the CCENT? Having either is impressive since you are still in high school especially the CCNA. I usually recommend A+ and Net+ (or CCENT) for people who are new to the IT field but it sounds like you know what you are doing by getting an internship. Good luck on the exam!
    Working on: MCSA 2012 R2
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