Whats the diff ...

AndreLAndreL Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
whats the differance between a BS Information Technology and BS Computer Science

Comments

  • nicklauscombsnicklauscombs Member Posts: 885
    computer science usually tends to deal with programming while information technology/systems is usually networking and computer repair/troubleshooting related
    WIP: IPS exam
  • supertechCETmasupertechCETma Member Posts: 377
    Typical degree overviews:

    Bachelor of Science Computer Science:
    Degree requirements include courses in object oriented programming, data structures and algorithms, operating systems, computer communication networks, software engineering, and computer architecture, as well as mathematics, statistics and the natural sciences.

    The Bachelor of Science with a Major in Information Technology Management Program is designed to meet the increasing demand for technology expertise in consulting, marketing and sales support, customer services and support, information and library science and general management.
    Electronic Technicians Association-International www.eta-i.org
    The Fiber Optic Association www.thefoa.org
    Home Acoustics Alliance® http://www.homeacoustics.net/
    Imaging Science Foundation http://www.imagingscience.com/
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    A BS in Computer Science will tend to be mathematically-oriented. As someone on here once said, a BS in Computer Science does not equal "programming"....there are many subfields in computer science (including programming language theory). This degree will most likely be offered through a college of science. I see this as traditionally a degree field with a heavy focus on theory that likely requires high-level math beyond Calculus 1.

    A BS in IT will tend to be more of applied business degree focused on all of the things that can be done with information (storing, retrieving, processing, etc...). This degree will often be offered by a college of business. I see this as a degree field with a heavy focus on the business aspects of working with information. Some of these programs require Calculus 1, but I would be surprised if they go beyond that. "Business math" is often the more likely math requirement for this type of degree. (My personal opinion is that at a minimum any "BS" degree should require Calculus 1 and hard science courses, but they don't necessarily). This degree also likely requires accounting, finance, and economics coursework.

    There will likely be content spillover between these two degrees. I envision it as a Venn diagram with some amount of shared area between these two degree fields.

    All of the above depends on the school...schools are pretty much free to call whatever they want, whatever they want....your mileage may vary.

    MS
  • jryantechjryantech Member Posts: 623
    eMeS wrote:
    A BS in Computer Science will tend to be mathematically-oriented.

    Ah man, I'm getting my A.A. not even my B.S. and I'm already heading into Calculus with Analytic Geometry and Physics with Calculus...

    You do SO much more Math then Programming, but I suppose its a good thing down the road.

    B.S. in Information Technology is a lot easier I think looking at the classes and defiantly more business and data oriented.
    "It's Microsoft versus mankind with Microsoft having only a slight lead."
    -Larry Ellison, CEO, Oracle

    Studying: SCJA
    Occupation: Information Systems Technician
  • TryPingingTheServerTryPingingTheServer Member Posts: 51 ■■□□□□□□□□
    eMeS wrote:
    A BS in Computer Science will tend to be mathematically-oriented. As someone on here once said, a BS in Computer Science does not equal "programming"....there are many subfields in computer science (including programming language theory). This degree will most likely be offered through a college of science. I see this as traditionally a degree field with a heavy focus on theory that likely requires high-level math beyond Calculus 1.

    A BS in IT will tend to be more of applied business degree focused on all of the things that can be done with information (storing, retrieving, processing, etc...). This degree will often be offered by a college of business. I see this as a degree field with a heavy focus on the business aspects of working with information. Some of these programs require Calculus 1, but I would be surprised if they go beyond that. "Business math" is often the more likely math requirement for this type of degree. (My personal opinion is that at a minimum any "BS" degree should require Calculus 1 and hard science courses, but they don't necessarily). This degree also likely requires accounting, finance, and economics coursework.

    There will likely be content spillover between these two degrees. I envision it as a Venn diagram with some amount of shared area between these two degree fields.

    All of the above depends on the school...schools are pretty much free to call whatever they want, whatever they want....your mileage may vary.

    MS


    Spot on.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_of_Computer_Science
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor_of_Information_Technology
    "His GPA is a solid 2.0. Right in that meaty part of the curve - not showing off, not falling behind."
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