Which area of IT?

xocerrpyxocerrpy Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello


I'm new to this forum and I want to ask a couple of questions. I'm into computers, and have done some basic support work in a small pc shop. I'm looking at moving forward now, and I'm trying to figure out where to aim for. I started a CS degree, but I found that I wasn't suited to programming, and no matter how hard I tried it just didn't flow. More than that really, I didn't like or enjoy what I was doing. Which brings me on to my questions.

I am trying to decide whether or not to focus my attention on networking or DB work. How similar to java and C++ (high level langauge) is database work? If I didn't take to programming, is it fair to say that I would struggle with DB work too?

Comments

  • vColevCole Member Posts: 1,574 ■■■■■■■□□□
    You seem more like a hardware type of person. (Like myself) I don't personally like programming and Database is similar.

    I'm getting my associates as an IT Support Specialist then getting my degree in Computer Information Systems. I was going for my Bachelor's in Network Engineering.


    www.bls.gov has an Occupational Outlook Handbook which you can browse all the different type of jobs & what training/degrees you need to obtain them. As well as job outlook and salary information.
  • darkerosxxdarkerosxx Banned Posts: 1,343
    Programming and DB work are very similar.

    If you don't like programming but like computers, try out a Computer Information Systems(CIS) degree. Look at a curriculum and see if you like it. A lot of people fit the mold and are one of the two: CS or CIS.
  • xocerrpyxocerrpy Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    darkerosxx wrote:
    Programming and DB work are very similar.

    If you don't like programming but like computers, try out a Computer Information Systems(CIS) degree. Look at a curriculum and see if you like it. A lot of people fit the mold and are one of the two: CS or CIS.

    I have looked at a few programs, and it seems more business oriented. I do love the technical side of things, I just seem intolerant to coding. icon_sad.gif
    You seem more like a hardware type of person. (Like myself) I don't personally like programming and Database is similar.

    I think I am more of a hardware person. I was under the impression though that if you wanted to work in the hardware side you would have to do an EE degree?
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Member Posts: 2,077 ■■■■■■□□□□
    xocerrpy,

    This is a certification forum. You are going to find, that we all agree that degrees are helpful, but we generally believe that the certification programs created by the vendors are much more in tune with market demands.

    That being said, get what ever degree you feel comfortable with. If you are interested in database you should probably start with the Microsoft exam 70-431.
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exams/70-431.aspx

    If you like what you see there press forward into the Microsoft Database administrator certification. If you are more interested in the hardware though, networking might be more up your alley, in which case you want to start with Cisco's CCENT certification.
    http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/le2/le45/learning_certification_level_home.html

    best of luck on what ever you decide!
    -Daniel
  • xocerrpyxocerrpy Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Daniel333 wrote:
    xocerrpy,

    This is a certification forum. You are going to find, that we all agree that degrees are helpful, but we generally believe that the certification programs created by the vendors are much more in tune with market demands.

    That being said, get what ever degree you feel comfortable with. If you are interested in database you should probably start with the Microsoft exam 70-431.
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exams/70-431.aspx

    If you like what you see there press forward into the Microsoft Database administrator certification. If you are more interested in the hardware though, networking might be more up your alley, in which case you want to start with Cisco's CCENT certification.
    http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/le2/le45/learning_certification_level_home.html

    best of luck on what ever you decide!

    Thanks. I got a litle side tracked. I guess what I should have asked is what certs would be best to aim for If someone was more interested in the hardware side of computers?
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,034 Admin
    xocerrpy wrote:
    I think I am more of a hardware person. I was under the impression though that if you wanted to work in the hardware side you would have to do an EE degree?
    This is pretty much the case. While the math and general ed requirements are about the same, a CS program is heavy on programming and an EE program is heavy on electronics design and engineering. And as an EE student, you will still need to do some programming (C, assembly) when it comes to writing firmware for your class projects.
  • famosbrownfamosbrown Member Posts: 637
    it's pretty hard to find a degree that majors totally on the hardware side of traditonal I.T. like servers, routers. switches, etc.

    Like JD said, EE is more designing all types of computers from the computers in your car or the computers that control the robots at pharmaceutical companies. When I went to school, my major was MIS. I basically took all of the CS classes that CS majors took, but while they went through some EE classes and advanced math classes, I was off taking all of the Business courses other Business majors took.

    Degrees are very good to have for longevity and for flexibility amongst different industries and job responsibilities.

    A good certification to start off with if you don't have much experience is A+, then Net+, and maybe even Sec+. Then report back what you are liking so far and we might be able to point you in the right direction, i.e. Cisco, MS, or Security.
    B.S.B.A. (Management Information Systems)
    M.B.A. (Technology Management)
  • maumercadomaumercado Member Posts: 163
    Hello... Im an electronic engineer, but I want to work in IT, as Jd says we do a lot of C and assembly programming, and took most of CS and Computer Network engineering, cuz the last branch of engineering here does not exists, and computer science here is known as systems engineering, the thing is Ive been working as a web penetration tester, but dont know if that would do good for my future in IT? I worked a lot of time as techie for network, pc, systems support before I got my new job, mostly help desk.

    I love IT, systems administration and network administration, so... what to do... Ive posted before that I want a master in information security, and currently studying net+ and sec+ certs... also LPI...

    So am I in a good track with my job and all? any advice?

    Thank you all...
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,034 Admin
    For a future in InfoSec, you are on the right track studying both the sysadmin and netadmin fields. Always keep a thought towards securing hosts and networks while you are learning implementation, maintenance, and design of networks and data systems. The Security+ is the recommended first security cert. Once you get into the more advanced security certs you will be surprised at how much more to InfoSec there is than just information systems and telecommunications.
  • rfult001rfult001 Member Posts: 407
    There are degrees available in Computer Engineering (EE but specific to Computers), Information Technology (Infrastructure and Networking), and Telecommunications. You will not escape programming, no matter where you go. It is just something you deal with with computers, which is why you will see it being taught in just about any computer related degree.

    If you don't want to go this route and you are interested specifically in networking, start with the A+ and Network+ then jump into something vendor specific like the Cisco or Juniper certs.

    Once you get your hands dirty you might find yourself veering away from hardware and getting into other things, like system administration icon_eek.gif
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