Job searching

TechBoy22TechBoy22 Member Posts: 81 ■■□□□□□□□□
Currently, I am going for my A+ cert and after that it will either be Network + or CCNA. I want to be a network engineer. Basically my current job sucks and I would like to start some type of work in the field of my career. What type of places should I look into and what might these places pay for someone that has no experience? I live in NJ in a town that is 20 minutes from Manhatten, NY. Im guessing there is a lot out there but dont really know where to look. Is it smarter to just wait it out and look once I get my certification, or is it possible to survive and hopefully get the chance to learn with a new job? Any insight? I greatly appriciate it and so far I find this site helpful.
Michael
_______________________________________

Dreams are made up of small ideas with BIG pictures. Focus is the key that unlocks the door to success.

Comments

  • snokerpokersnokerpoker Member Posts: 661 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I would recommend getting A+ and possibly MS 70-270 to start with, then going after CCNA. Getting a job as Network engineer is extremely difficult with no experience. If you get your A+ and MCP certs, you can more than likely land an entry level helpdesk/desktop support or computer tech job and use that as a stepping stone. I think its best to land a job in IT then go after CCNA so that way by the time you have it, you've already been working in the field for 6 months, 1 year etc.... Network + would be a good idea again going back the entry level job thing, but if you are set on CCNA you might just want to save the money. I don't want to sound like i'm trying to tell you can't get a job as a network engineer, its just I know at every place I've worked at and espeically now, all the "network" guys have 15-20 years experience. Good luck!
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Depending on your networking experience, Network+ might be a good next step. If you have plenty of experience working with routers, switches, cabling, etc., then the CCNA is a natural progression. The only way to know is to check out the exam objectives for each. If you're planning on going down the Microsoft route, the 70-270 will give you MCP status, but it might be a better choice to go for 70-620, the Vista exam, instead. This will give you a stand-alone certification, called MCTS: Windows Vista – Configuration, in addition to filling a necessary requirement for MCSA/MCSE, in addition to the newer certification on Windows Server 2008, called MCITP: Enterprise Administrator. The XP (70-270) exam applies only to the MCSA/MCSE path. If you're looking to round out your skills a little bit, in addition to Windows and network knowledge, I can also recommend a certification called Linux+, which will give you a foundation with Linux and Unix, giving you an edge over many Windows admins who often times aren't as familiar with those systems.

    As for the job-situation, I'd say your best bet would be to go for something like a helpdesk position, or even a depot-tech job, like Geek Squad. As you work, continue to study, and you'll either have the opportunity to rise up in your existing job, or find a new one, as time goes on. Honestly, though, I'd push harder for a helpdesk job, working "McTech" will drain your soul, eventually, and turn you into the kind of surly, jaded IT guy that you see on TV. . . you know, one like me. icon_lol.gif

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  • oo_snoopyoo_snoopy Member Posts: 124
    If you want to be a network engineer you're going to need a 4 year degree in a semi related field. Sure you can do it without one, but it will be very difficult and you'll be under payed.

    As the posters above me said, look for some entry level stuff like help desk, and sign up for Spring classes!
    I used to run the internet.
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    oo_snoopy wrote:
    If you want to be a network engineer you're going to need a 4 year degree in a semi related field. Sure you can do it without one, but it will be very difficult and you'll be under payed.

    As the posters above me said, look for some entry level stuff like help desk, and sign up for Spring classes!

    Please do not start another one of those debates. icon_rolleyes.gif

    It is very possible to be an engineer with or without a four year degree. How difficult it will be has more to do with your drive than any degree or certification.

    What ever you want to be just work hard because what you put in is what you get out regardless of any qualifications you may have.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • TechBoy22TechBoy22 Member Posts: 81 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you guys for responding. Right now, as far as my situation, I dont have the funds nor the time to goto a regular school. I have gotten lucky enough to make it to the A+ class this starting Sept. As far as networking goes, I know i want to obtain my CCNA for sure, but as far as help desk should I stick with Microsoft certs and go that route? Im sure it will help my experience and possibly land me more jobs. Im definately looking for entry level.
    Michael
    _______________________________________

    Dreams are made up of small ideas with BIG pictures. Focus is the key that unlocks the door to success.
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    If you know you want to go down the networking route than you should concentrate on that. I would skip the Comp TIA certs (except for maybe Net+ if you have the extra cash) and concentrate on the Cisco track.

    You should look for something entry level with an ISP or something that will get you some exposure to networking technology rather than desktop support. Just keep in mind that any experience is better than no experience when it comes to IT. So if all you can find is a helpdesk position I wouldn't pass it up.

    Good luck with your search!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    oo_snoopy wrote:
    If you want to be a network engineer you're going to need a 4 year degree in a semi related field. Sure you can do it without one, but it will be very difficult and you'll be under payed.

    As the posters above me said, look for some entry level stuff like help desk, and sign up for Spring classes!

    Please do not start another one of those debates. icon_rolleyes.gif

    It is very possible to be an engineer with or without a four year degree. How difficult it will be has more to do with your drive than any degree or certification.

    What ever you want to be just work hard because what you put in is what you get out regardless of any qualifications you may have.
    +1 to everything networker050184 said.
  • TechBoy22TechBoy22 Member Posts: 81 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you guys. I will definately follow what you had said. When searching for a job, What are some helpful keywords I should use or what exactly should I look for. Most networking companies want experienced and a qualified tech. How should I go about my search. After my Comptia A+ class I will definately go the Cisco route. Ever since I went to their site and did some research on it, I have been interested in their systems.
    Michael
    _______________________________________

    Dreams are made up of small ideas with BIG pictures. Focus is the key that unlocks the door to success.
  • oo_snoopyoo_snoopy Member Posts: 124
    oo_snoopy wrote:
    If you want to be a network engineer you're going to need a 4 year degree in a semi related field. Sure you can do it without one, but it will be very difficult and you'll be under payed.

    As the posters above me said, look for some entry level stuff like help desk, and sign up for Spring classes!

    Please do not start another one of those debates. icon_rolleyes.gif

    It is very possible to be an engineer with or without a four year degree. How difficult it will be has more to do with your drive than any degree or certification.

    What ever you want to be just work hard because what you put in is what you get out regardless of any qualifications you may have.

    I never said it's not possible, but it's not probable. Hard work is great, but sometimes it can only get you so far, I just want to help the OP get on the right track to his goals.
    I used to run the internet.
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