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CyberCrime careers?

Kevin10686Kevin10686 Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hello, I searched about this a little, didn't find to much. I am just wondering how one goes about getting into cybercrime? Do you have to become a law enforcement officer first and than apply to get into their department or does the military have any cybercrime related careers? Are there any training or certifications that can be obtained? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

BTW: I have a degree in Computer Information Systems and work as a Desktop Support Specialist but cybercrime has always been very interesting to me.


Thank You

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    bwcartybwcarty Member Posts: 422 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Have you tried searching for "computer forensics?"
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    KGhaleonKGhaleon Member Posts: 1,346 ■■■■□□□□□□
    You want to get into Cyber crime? icon_lol.gif

    Studying the security route would be the best option. You could become a whitehat or perhaps study forensics as mentioned.
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    Kevin10686Kevin10686 Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
    If I am not mistaken, they are 2 different fields. Computer forensics is more so collecting and gathering information after crimes have taken place using technology. A career in cyber crime would be more so finding and engaging with the criminal as they are committing the crime.
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    KaminskyKaminsky Member Posts: 1,235
    Degree courses in Computer Forensic type material are typically the way in as they usually are closely linked to local police/government agencies. Fascinating subject matter and if I had it to do over, that would be where I would be headed.

    A friend's son is doing a course in Computer Forensics in the UK and the stuff he has been taught is really interesting stuff. The course is so closely linked to a local police adademy that the students even take part in mock raids with the police.

    Typically, these students are taken on into police or other agencies after they graduate although they openly admit that about 1 in 5 students will actually be coerced into organised crime instead.
    Kam.
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    supertechCETmasupertechCETma Member Posts: 377
    Law enforcement is the quickest start. Most current forensic investigators are cops who had a knack for computers and ran with it. Advanced degrees will help. Watch out for computer forensic certifications. Most are for-profit driven and no single cert has risen as the preeminent "must have" University of Florida has a good program. Here is a list of others.

    http://www.e-evidence.info/education.html

    Due diligence is the order of the day when researching programs. Do your homework. Ask local professionals. It's not an easy field to crack. Stay away from child pornography. It will mess with your head. Corporate is an optioanl avenue. Insurance and accounting fraud are big.
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    the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I've had interaction with many law enforcement officers and agents who deal in cyber crime. Only direct route would be a technical degree and an agency that deals with it. If you go local or state, your going to be on patrol for awhile before you move into a unit that deals with cyber crime. On the Federal side your best bet would be the FBI as they are actively recruiting people with technical degrees for their cyber squad. The only other agency would be the Secret Service, all the others would be hit or miss with what you do out of the gate.
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    Kevin10686Kevin10686 Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for all the information. Yeah I looked at FBI and the federal side but they seem to want a bachelors degree. I have an Associates in Computer Info. Systems and starting this winter semester I am going to continue but go towards the program of Cybercrime at my local college.
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    the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Then look towards a local pd or county sheriff/police as they usually only require 60 college credits.
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    JDMurrayJDMurray Admin Posts: 13,042 Admin
    Law enforcement experience while in the military is also a ticket into computer forensics. I know of a person who actually joined a police academy specifically to get his start in forensics.

    A similar field is Electronic Data Discovery (EDD or eDiscovery). It's easier for the non-legal tech to get into because you will be working for lawyers that will handle all the legal stuff.
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    Uchiha SasukeUchiha Sasuke Member Posts: 42 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Is Cisco good for this stuff ?

    Thank you.
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    Kevin10686Kevin10686 Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Yeah I went to the Maryland State Police orientation to receive information because they have a Computer Crimes Unit. However, you must first be a Trooper for 2 years. May be worth it though. I will be able to work with technology and crimes related to technology and also be able to lock someone up. Seems like a win-win situation to me. Thanks everyone!
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    sharptechsharptech Member Posts: 492 ■■□□□□□□□□
    This is something I have always wanted to do, but never knew where to get started. I might start doing some research and seeing if there is any interest in my area or need for this - any other way to get started, but to actually join up as a Police Officer first?
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    MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Looked up salaries... Didn't do a lot of research but found.

    Average Computer Crime salary: 40K
    http://www.simplyhired.com/a/salary/search/q-Computer+Crime


    SeniorCybercrime Analyst in DC (I'm not sure what this equates to in normal cost of living areas): 93-121K
    http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime/hiring.html

    Average Computer Forensics: 50K
    http://degreedirectory.org/articles/Computer_Forensics_Associate's_Degree.html


    The salary doesn't sound as good as if you went the Storage or CCIE route where you can make 90-120K outside of DC's cost of living. And I bet the demand is much less. Just some things to consider.
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    the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Going Federal is the only way you can jump straight into cyber crimes. Very few local agencies that will have you doing criminal investigations out of the gate. Generally speaking, you will server two years as a police officer and then will be able to move to a specialized unit. Might take longer if the agency is small. But FBI, ICE, Secret Service, and Postal Inspection Service will have you investigating cyber crimes as soon as you are done with the academy. But gotta have a degree for all of those agencies except for ICE. ICE will take four years of investigative experience, but if you say you have that they will grill you big time at the interview. I'd agree with JD that you should try getting on with a law firm. EnCase certification would be a great start and then look to join groups that promote government and private sector cooperation.

    http://www.infragard.net/ - Run by the FBI
    http://www.secretservice.gov/ectf.shtml - Run by the Secret Service

    You have to be in a security position when applying and they will put you through a background check. After that you can attend meetings and meet people from various agencies, colleges, and private companies. I've had the chance to meet people from TCNJ, Princeton, FBI, NCIS, IRS, Secret Service, ICE (use to work for them), various local police agencies, NJSP, PSP, and then various private companies. Great way to network and to learn about various attacks/techniques that criminals are using. Good luck!
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    sharptechsharptech Member Posts: 492 ■■□□□□□□□□
    the_Grinch wrote:
    Going Federal is the only way you can jump straight into cyber crimes. Very few local agencies that will have you doing criminal investigations out of the gate. Generally speaking, you will server two years as a police officer and then will be able to move to a specialized unit. Might take longer if the agency is small. But FBI, ICE, Secret Service, and Postal Inspection Service will have you investigating cyber crimes as soon as you are done with the academy. But gotta have a degree for all of those agencies except for ICE. ICE will take four years of investigative experience, but if you say you have that they will grill you big time at the interview. I'd agree with JD that you should try getting on with a law firm. EnCase certification would be a great start and then look to join groups that promote government and private sector cooperation.

    http://www.infragard.net/ - Run by the FBI
    http://www.secretservice.gov/ectf.shtml - Run by the Secret Service

    You have to be in a security position when applying and they will put you through a background check. After that you can attend meetings and meet people from various agencies, colleges, and private companies. I've had the chance to meet people from TCNJ, Princeton, FBI, NCIS, IRS, Secret Service, ICE (use to work for them), various local police agencies, NJSP, PSP, and then various private companies. Great way to network and to learn about various attacks/techniques that criminals are using. Good luck!

    Excellent post! Yeah not sure which way I want to go with this - I am mad at myself because the FBI was doing recruiting in my area and I was scheduled to take the test, but never did because things got in the way at the time.

    When you say "you have to be in a security position when applying" what positions qualify for this?

    Right now I am working IT for a company - so not in a security position. I will take a look at those links later - thanks.
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    the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    As it was explained to me, as long as you do some form of security you shouldn't have a problem getting in. It really is a great way to network and they usually have some great speakers.
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    sharptechsharptech Member Posts: 492 ■■□□□□□□□□
    the_Grinch wrote:
    As it was explained to me, as long as you do some form of security you shouldn't have a problem getting in. It really is a great way to network and they usually have some great speakers.

    Like what type of security? I probably could not get in, I really do not do anything w/ security, maybe some past work in infrastructure security, but nothing high level at all.

    I am going to print the application and send it off.. also if I do get involved with this can this get me involved in Cyber crime work etc.. later on?
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    the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    A professor of mine helps with raids and tag and bags so you could get in it, but I believe to do it they would expect extensive security background. I'd say send in your app and see what happens, worst they can do is say no. As for type of security, could be securing wifi networks, hardening systems, setting up VPNs.
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    sharptechsharptech Member Posts: 492 ■■□□□□□□□□
    the_Grinch wrote:
    A professor of mine helps with raids and tag and bags so you could get in it, but I believe to do it they would expect extensive security background. I'd say send in your app and see what happens, worst they can do is say no. As for type of security, could be securing wifi networks, hardening systems, setting up VPNs.

    OK great - thank you.
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