What is your opinion on....

IT ManIT Man Member Posts: 159
CCNP bootcamps. My employer would be willing to pay for me to attend one and I was thinking about it for next year. I just wanted to know if you guys have ever gone to one and what the experience was like? Also, if you feel they are even worth it?

Thanks
Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll still land among the stars. - Les Brown

Comments

  • cisco_troopercisco_trooper Too many Member Posts: 1,441 ■■■■□□□□□□
    If your employer is paying AND isn't going to hold it over your head somehow, then go.

    Otherwise, don't bother, you will retain very little of this information.
  • IT ManIT Man Member Posts: 159
    If your employer is paying AND isn't going to hold it over your head

    Well only catch would be I'd have to commit to a year from the date they write the check.
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll still land among the stars. - Les Brown
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Is your knowledge near the level of a CCNP? If not, it's just going to go in one ear and out the other. I wouldn't use a boot camp for anything other than a last-minute review before an exam, especially if it requires a commitment like that.
  • cisco_troopercisco_trooper Too many Member Posts: 1,441 ■■■■□□□□□□
    IT Man wrote:
    If your employer is paying AND isn't going to hold it over your head

    Well only catch would be I'd have to commit to a year from the date they write the check.

    I'd pass. Like dynamik said, if you aren't at or near CCNP level it isn't going to be of much use to you. If you are fresh off a CCNA the most you're going to take with you is a bunch of topics you want to look at, all of which can be found in the Table of Contents of the CCNP books.
  • empc4000xlempc4000xl Member Posts: 322
    Depends on when you are going, and who's teaching it. If you plan was to go late feb or early march and you pouded the books and some labs real hard. You will be able to have your CCNP when you leave the bootcamp. If you were planning on sticking around why not. Go for it. Don't turn down free training.
  • ilcram19-2ilcram19-2 Banned Posts: 436
    CCNP is just a certification and it doesnt garanty you that you'll keep 100% of the knowledge,
    but if you employer is going to pay and is going to allow you time to do it why not?, take it you will learn the rest by experiance, certifications wont teach everything but you will have a better level of knoledge that a non-CCNP has, so dont think that a cert will teach you everything you need to know becase it wont they dont a an extra chaper on the books that is call "experiance"
    but take it you wont go wrong.
  • IT ManIT Man Member Posts: 159
    Thanks for all of your comments!!!

    I did plan to take it in like March or April depending on availability of course. I would have had my CCNA about a year and a half and I work as a jr. network engineer now and by March, I would have been here a year. The reason I am really considering it is because a lot of what I have done over the last 7 months, mostly isn't even covered on the CCNA. I have set up multilink interfaces, site-to-site VPNs, configured a remotve VPN server using the IOS, Setting up T1 lines, Multilayer Switching, etc. I think the only thing I have really done that was CCNA related was setting up some VLANs and upgrading some IOS versions.

    Now don't get me wrong, I love what I am doing here and I enjoy the challenge and feeling of accomplishment when I have learned something new and got it to work correctly. I was just thinking about taking it to the next level since it will be paid for.

    In response to what was also said, I would begin to study for the CCNP just so when I get to class, everything isn't "new" to me. Perhaps pick up a CCNP for dummies book or something along those lines to review. I just don't want to get into the class and be too blown away. Most of my CCNA was self study and that material really did kick my ass, I passed on my third attempt, though I feel that if I was able to go back and review previous questions, I would have passed my first time. I know I am a smart guy, I just don't want to set myself up either.
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll still land among the stars. - Les Brown
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    So are you looking at boot camps for all four exams? This isn't the entire track rolled into one boot camp is it? That would be insane icon_eek.gif
  • IT ManIT Man Member Posts: 159
    dynamik wrote:
    So are you looking at boot camps for all four exams? This isn't the entire track rolled into one boot camp is it? That would be insane icon_eek.gif

    Yes the one's I looked at are like 13 or 14 days long and you just bang it out. I would probably need a few drunken_smilie.gif when I am done. Here are a few that I have looked at.

    http://www.americaninteractive.com/ccnpgoogle.html?gclid=CO67trmE0pYCFQxxHgodp3-f2g

    http://www.cbtplanet.com/cisco/ccnp-boot-camp-classes.htm
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll still land among the stars. - Les Brown
  • mikearamamikearama Member Posts: 749
    I've never had an employer willing to spend $6000 on me. Shoot... I'd be all over that like a fat kid on a smartie!
    There are only 10 kinds of people... those who understand binary, and those that don't.

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  • GT-RobGT-Rob Member Posts: 1,090
    What kind of commitment does your employer want?

    If he wants you to sign something, make sure its even legal. In this country its not, but not sure about the US.


    If he just wants your "word" that you will stay for a year, go for it.
  • IT ManIT Man Member Posts: 159
    GT-Rob wrote:
    What kind of commitment does your employer want?

    If he wants you to sign something, make sure its even legal. In this country its not, but not sure about the US.


    If he just wants your "word" that you will stay for a year, go for it.

    I am sure I will have to sign something or leave and pay them back. I only been here about 6 months and don't plan on leaving anytime soon.
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll still land among the stars. - Les Brown
  • ITdudeITdude Member Posts: 1,181 ■■■□□□□□□□
    While bootcamps in general are not the best way to learn something, if the boss is paying for it without major "costs" for you...go for it...

    One suggestion, if it will be given at a Cisco Training Partner, ask if you might be able to get access to the student guides for all 4 courses ahead of time. If you can read those and at least try to get a high level understanding of the concepts beforehand, it should make a noticeable difference when you take the courses.

    Good luck. icon_wink.gif
    I usually hang out on 224.0.0.10 (FF02::A) and 224.0.0.5 (FF02::5) when I'm in a non-proprietary mood.

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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Since it's so far out, hit the books hard, develop a solid foundation, and make the most of it. That sounds like a great opportunity, but you're going to waste it if you're not at least somewhat prepared. I think the consensus is that each pro-level exam is 2-3 times the content/difficulty of the CCNA, and you're going to be going through that much every 3-4 days.
  • nelnel Member Posts: 2,859 ■□□□□□□□□□
    No offence but i think it will be a waste of time if you are not prepared for each exam before you go. There will be way to much info there for you to take in.

    Just think if you were giving someone 6k then you would want to make sure you got what you wanted at the end - would you be able to deliver full knowledge of the NP track with little prior knowledge? doubtful.

    What i would do is speak to your employer and say you dont think this is the best option for your ccnp studies (he may even respect you more for doing so) and ask if he would be willing to buy resources etc for your NP studies, pay for your exams, cbts possibly etc. I assume you'll already have access to lab equipment at work or if not through in some stuff too.

    For me, the last suggestion is 6k well spent compared to the bootcamp - especially for someone who is in your position and just learning the material (as i am).

    A similar thing happened to me the other week - was offered a few courses but it didnt mount up to your costs. i went in and explained what i said to you above and now they are prepared to buy my books etc and give me access to the necessary equipment for my NP.
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  • AlexMRAlexMR Member Posts: 275
    If you have to sign a contract for a year just make sure you get something out of your new training in financial terms. Does your company have specific career advancement plans? have they outlined one for you specifically? If the answer to those questions is NO then I wouldnt sign. The key to making good money as an employee is, above allthings, IMHO, working for the right company.

    If you feel you are there then commit, if not, the bootcamp knowledge you will pick is not worth it. Hell, after being self studying and going so fast for the last few years, Im finding it difficult to start my MBA because i think the University pace is just too slow.
    Training/Studying for....CCNP (BSCI) and some MS.
  • IT ManIT Man Member Posts: 159
    AlexMR wrote:
    If you have to sign a contract for a year just make sure you get something out of your new training in financial terms. Does your company have specific career advancement plans? have they outlined one for you specifically? If the answer to those questions is NO then I wouldnt sign. The key to making good money as an employee is, above allthings, IMHO, working for the right company.

    If you feel you are there then commit, if not, the bootcamp knowledge you will pick is not worth it. Hell, after being self studying and going so fast for the last few years, Im finding it difficult to start my MBA because i think the University pace is just too slow.

    Alex,

    That is sort of what the game plan is for me. I was hired as a jr. network engineer and my manager is the sr. network engineer. He is basically tired of doing the "dirty work" and is trying to groom me to become the network engineer so he can just basically manage with minimal hands on work.
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you'll still land among the stars. - Les Brown
  • netwaynenetwayne Member Posts: 44 ■■□□□□□□□□
    IT Man wrote:
    AlexMR wrote:
    If you have to sign a contract for a year just make sure you get something out of your new training in financial terms. Does your company have specific career advancement plans? have they outlined one for you specifically? If the answer to those questions is NO then I wouldnt sign. The key to making good money as an employee is, above allthings, IMHO, working for the right company.

    If you feel you are there then commit, if not, the bootcamp knowledge you will pick is not worth it. Hell, after being self studying and going so fast for the last few years, Im finding it difficult to start my MBA because i think the University pace is just too slow.

    Alex,

    That is sort of what the game plan is for me. I was hired as a jr. network engineer and my manager is the sr. network engineer. He is basically tired of doing the "dirty work" and is trying to groom me to become the network engineer so he can just basically manage with minimal hands on work.


    Looks like you got lots of opinions here....My 2 cents would be it's not uncommon for employers to offer up expensive training and then not wanting you to bolt for higher $$$ with your new shiny cert so they stipulate you stay another year or some time frame so they can reap some benefit from your new found skills. I had this exact scenario with my MCSE although it was not a boot camp. I agree with the others that despite the attraction of free training and possibly saving some time to cert, you really have to be far along and into your CCNP studies to probably benefit from the bootcamp. I'd prefer to have the employer pay for all of my study materials and passed exam costs and go through the normal study time frame (sounds like this might be a conflict with your boss though). Yeah, we'd all like to take less time for each cert but the CCNP is just way too much material. Honestly, after the hours I spent preparing for the CCNA, I'm glad I didn't try to bootcamp that one.
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