New website blog

jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
Hello everyone as you know I've been pretty busy lately wrapping-up projects to my old job since I have to transition to a new position/job at Fox/2oth Century, I would like to ask people who has experience with blogging what software do you use to publish your websites? I am looking into completely going back to my studies, and creating a blog out of it.

I was thinking of using IIS for my web server at home, and just using MS Publisher so that I do not overwelm myself, if you have any suggestion please let me know, I am hoping to fireup my webserver today my domain name at godaddy is "soggyrice.com".

Happy Gobble Gobble!!!

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Are you hosting the website yourself?

    Take a look at these for blogging software: http://www.ojr.org/ojr/images/blog_software_comparison.cfm

    Wordpress is probably the most common.
  • jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
    dynamik wrote:
    Are you hosting the website yourself?

    Take a look at these for blogging software: http://www.ojr.org/ojr/images/blog_software_comparison.cfm

    Wordpress is probably the most common.

    Yes I am hosting it at home, using IIS, thanks I'll read more about Wordpress.
  • ladiesman217ladiesman217 Member Posts: 416
    how much did it cost you to host your website? I'm totally new to it, does it require you to have a public IP? what else is needed? icon_confused.gif
    No Sacrifice, No Victory.
  • jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
    Just my internet connection from my ISP I have 5 static public IP, if you have Dynamik! you can use a DDNS to host your website if your ISP gives you a dynamik public IP.

    http://www.dyndns.com/services/dns/dyndns/

    As long you have an internet connection your ISP automatically gives you a public IP usually this public IP changes since there's a lease duration.
  • ladiesman217ladiesman217 Member Posts: 416
    My ISP is using NAT. Can I still use dyndns? I can't even use rdp icon_cry.gif
    No Sacrifice, No Victory.
  • jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
    My ISP is using NAT. Can I still use dyndns? I can't even use rdp icon_cry.gif

    As far as I am aware dynamic Public IP is NAT when your using a router/gateway.

    You'll need to setup a port forwarding for RDP port number going to your computers private IP address in your router.
  • ladiesman217ladiesman217 Member Posts: 416
    what I mean is I'm behind the ISP's NAT. If I check my using whatismyip.com I can see my IP but it's different when I use ipconfig. How's that?
    No Sacrifice, No Victory.
  • jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
    what I mean is I'm behind the ISP's NAT. If I check my using whatismyip.com I can see my IP but it's different when I use ipconfig. How's that?

    Are you using a router that has a DHCP server built in?
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,353
    what I mean is I'm behind the ISP's NAT. If I check my using whatismyip.com I can see my IP but it's different when I use ipconfig. How's that?

    Read up on NAT Overloading otherwise known as Port Address Translation (PAT). I explain it here:
    http://techexams.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=33863

    A short jist of how home routers work is they use DHCP to get an IP from your ISP which is a public IP. Your home router then uses DHCP to hand out private IPs to systems hooked up to the router. The router then uses PAT to provide internet access using your single public IP that your router contains.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Some ISPs do not assign public/routable address. His ISP may indeed be using NAT/PAT, in which case he would be SOL.
  • ladiesman217ladiesman217 Member Posts: 416
    jbaello wrote:
    what I mean is I'm behind the ISP's NAT. If I check my using whatismyip.com I can see my IP but it's different when I use ipconfig. How's that?

    Are you using a router that has a DHCP server built in?

    thank jbaello,

    no I don't have a router. My nic is directly connected to the antenna, yeah antenna because I'm using wireless broadband. Maybe It's clearer now...

    @royal and dynamik, thanks I'm going to research about it.
    No Sacrifice, No Victory.
  • ladiesman217ladiesman217 Member Posts: 416
    dynamik wrote:
    Some ISPs do not assign public/routable address. His ISP may indeed be using NAT/PAT, in which case he would be SOL.


    what is SOL? singles online? icon_lol.gif
    No Sacrifice, No Victory.
  • ladiesman217ladiesman217 Member Posts: 416
    royal wrote:
    what I mean is I'm behind the ISP's NAT. If I check my using whatismyip.com I can see my IP but it's different when I use ipconfig. How's that?

    Read up on NAT Overloading otherwise known as Port Address Translation (PAT). I explain it here:
    http://techexams.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=33863

    A short jist of how home routers work is they use DHCP to get an IP from your ISP which is a public IP. Your home router then uses DHCP to hand out private IPs to systems hooked up to the router. The router then uses PAT to provide internet access using your single public IP that your router contains.


    hi royal,

    I don't have a router. I have used a router before using the same ISP and yeah you seem to be right. I have doubts I really can't use RDP or host a website with these configuration...can you pls clarify. thanks.
    No Sacrifice, No Victory.
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    what is SOL? singles online? icon_lol.gif

    S**t Out of Luck ;)

    So are you connected directly to a cable/dsl modem?

    You need to figure out what the IP they're assigning to your device is. If you're getting a public one, you can setup port forwarding and use things like RDP. There is a small chance their device will allow you to do that, but you'll probably have to get your own router.
  • bertiebbertieb Member Posts: 1,031 ■■■■■■□□□□
    dynamik wrote:
    Some ISPs do not assign public/routable address. His ISP may indeed be using NAT/PAT, in which case he would be SOL.

    Some ISP's block common ports such as TCP80/443 (inbound) to stop you hosting sites at home/on non-business DSL/Cable lines. Part of the ISP I work for (before the broadband bit was sold) used to do this.
    The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you can never tell if they are genuine - Abraham Lincoln
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