MCSE. RHCE, CCNA/CCVP, CompTIA A+, Linux+ All in one package

Hi Guys,

I was just wondering, i know its not practical (or maybe it might be) for one person to get all these certifications. My question is, how long would it take (from start to finish) to achieve all these certifications?

Also, based on your experiences, how marketable would this person be? In terms of salary, benefits and entitlements.

Please give detailed answers if you don't mind, stating:

Estimated yearly income:
How long it will take to complete the MCSE certification:
How long it will take to complete the RHCE certification:
How long it will take to complete the CCNA certification:
How long it will take to complete the CCVP certification:
How long it will take to complete the CompTIA A+ certification:
How long it will take to complete the CompTIA Linux+ certification:
How marketable the person will be:

NB: I study 3hrs a night, everyday including weekends.
I understand that it will be expensive but I will be prepared to make sacrifices
Please state the age you were when you finished the certification if you can

Thanks to all of you who bothered to read and answer this post!!!
Failure is a stepping stone to success...

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    Not practical? There are people here who's cert list dwarf that. Those are just the beginning ;)

    Your marketability/salary is going to depend on a lot of other things as well. Your people skills, formal education, experience, etc. are all going to play a role in that.

    Hopefully, I'll have a list like that by the end of 2009 (with a few variations). My first cert was the MCP in Feb, 2007, so it'll take me about three years by the time I'm done. I've been busy with college a lot too though, but I'll probably have another 6-8 certs on top of that. I'll be 26 in January.

    The time is going to vary a bit, but if I were to make estimates, I'd go with 1-2 months per MS or CompTIA exam, 2-4 for CCNA and pro-level Cisco exams, and maybe 4-6 months for the RHCE. Obviously, that's going to vary a great deal between people.
  • rubberToerubberToe Posts: 56Inactive Imported Users ■■□□□□□□□□
    Employers might have mixed feelings on someone who applies with a plethora of certifications, no experience and no education.

    Generally, if you can, get an education in IT and then get a job. While you work up the ranks, do your certifications. That way it will coincide with your advancement through the field and you will be able to tailor them to the direction you decide to go in. Knocking out an A+, CCNA, MCP would be as far as I went before trying to get a job.
  • dtlokeedtlokee Posts: 2,381Member
    It will take as long as it takes, not one second more, not one second less

    <---- That took me 10 years so far.
    The only easy day was yesterday!
  • skrpuneskrpune Posts: 1,409Member
    I have to agree with dynamik here. If you put your mind to it, you can certainly get all those certs. But how long it will take will depend on you...putting in 3 hours a night every night takes a lot of dedication, and you're likely looking at 1-2 years or more of preparation & testing. Also, some certs will take longer than others depending on the difficulty/breadth of the particular subject matter & your previous experience.

    rubbertoe also makes a good point about education/experience vs oodles of certs. What kind of background/education do you have?
    Currently Studying For: Nothing (cert-wise, anyway)
    Next Up: Security+, 291?

    Enrolled in Masters program: CS 2011 expected completion
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    How marketable the person will be
    With no experience -- not very.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber Posts: 1,480Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    There's no way to really answer this question. Far too many variables such as what training resources you have access to such as gear for the Cisco certifications, a beefy computer capable of running a handful of VM's for some of the other certifications. It also depends on what kind of learner you are and how well you retain knowledge. If you pick things up fast, it won't take as long of course.

    Are you already employed in the IT industry? If so what do you currently do? I would be worried to either not be working in IT or working in IT but at a basic helpdesk type level and to obtain all of those certifications because it won't look as good as you think it might to be in a lower position but have those kinds of certifications.

    Your best bet is to probably work hard at getting into job if you aren't already where you have room for growth into some of the areas you plan to certify. Then work hard, shadow your fellow co-workers as you can to express interest, study on the side and generally show your employer that you have the drive and ambition to move up and things will fall into place for you.
  • azjagazjag Posts: 579Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Coming from the community college that i attend you could complete all these certifications in ~5 years. 4 classes a semester. 2 classes every 8 weeks. one class on monday and wednesday nights, another on tuesday and thursday nights. 6pm to 10pm each night. Saturday from 8am to 2 pm for labs. Classes to fill in the blanks to cement your knowledge during winter intersession and summer school. It also depends on how well you take tests. RHCE is a hands on timed exam. CCNA and CCVP have lots of simulations (from what i have heard).

    With the assumption that you are working in a position that also supports the wide range of systems that you will be learning.

    You could easily clear $60k US a year. standard benefits. Not to sure what you mean by entitlements. But with no experience or very little experience, I can't name an employer that will put you at the helm of their operations. You will still start out ~ $12 to $20 hr for the first few years. More than likely on a helpdesk or in a junior network position.

    Also, what employer would put all of their eggs in one basket either. That is why you should pick CCVP, RHCE or MCSE as your focus. Then pick up other certs as needed.

    Of course this is only my opinion. :D
    Currently Studying:
    VMware Certified Advanced Professional 5 – Data Center Administration (VCAP5-DCA) (Passed)
    VMware Certified Advanced Professional 5 – Data Center Design (VCAP5-DCD)
  • rubberToerubberToe Posts: 56Inactive Imported Users ■■□□□□□□□□
    This is the way I see it:

    Depending on your situation go to school, do internships, then get a job. Enhance your career with certifications based on the direction you want to take.

    Otherwise if you do not have that luxury, [family or no money or not enough time etc] certifications can aid in a career transition into IT where you still have to pay your dues to work your way up the pay scale.

    Certifications are not "pass go collect $200" fast track to a slick paying IT position. Most if not all IT positions require interpersonal skills, intelligence (not just of the technical nature), life skills.

    Employers are looking for well rounded individuals and the certs are a plus. Technical skills are only part of the equation.

    Before even getting my foot in the door for an onsite at a Trading Firm hiring Systems Support I had to:

    1)Take a Wonderlic aptitude test [35 questions, 8 mins]

    2)Participate in a 35 min phone interview

    3)Take a Brainbench technical assessment test

    4)At the onsite take another Wonderlic test [50 questions, 12 minutes]

    5)Solve 7 mathematical problems, some Discrete Mathematics others logic problems

    6)Interview with the Head of Technology and a Systems Admin.

    Food for thought.
  • Hey thanks to everyone who answered!!!

    My current situation is as follows:

    I just turned 20 (01/12/8icon_cool.gif, I work for an Internet Service Provider as a level 1 technical support officer. I am being developed by the company to become the head of their software support division (hence the MCSE being first to tackle). I work from 8 in the morning to 6 in the afternoon. I study at night from 7-10 (3 hours).

    Thanks again guys!!!
    Failure is a stepping stone to success...
  • jamesp1983jamesp1983 Posts: 2,475Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    rubberToe wrote:
    Employers might have mixed feelings on someone who applies with a plethora of certifications, no experience and no education.

    Generally, if you can, get an education in IT and then get a job. While you work up the ranks, do your certifications. That way it will coincide with your advancement through the field and you will be able to tailor them to the direction you decide to go in. Knocking out an A+, CCNA, MCP would be as far as I went before trying to get a job.

    Excellent! I couldn't agree more.
    "Check both the destination and return path when a route fails." "Switches create a network. Routers connect networks."
  • brad-brad- Posts: 1,218Member
    dtlokee wrote:
    It will take as long as it takes

    +1

    everyone's schedules are different. the amount of money and time you can put into it are not the same as everyone else. the rate at which you learn is not the same. the rate at which you "test learn" is even different.

    It is good to have long term goals...but make them in baby steps, or you'll never get there. Take it one chapter at a time. Do what you can, get some real world experience along the way, and keep re-evaluating your goals.
  • jscimeca715jscimeca715 Posts: 280Member
    brad- wrote:
    dtlokee wrote:
    It will take as long as it takes

    +1

    everyone's schedules are different. the amount of money and time you can put into it are not the same as everyone else. the rate at which you learn is not the same. the rate at which you "test learn" is even different.

    It is good to have long term goals...but make them in baby steps, or you'll never get there. Take it one chapter at a time. Do what you can, get some real world experience along the way, and keep re-evaluating your goals.

    I also have to agree with the baby steps. I got my Network+ and A+ certification in about one year and I was on top of the world. I decided to tackle the Cisco certification next and was riding high thinking that I could just do what I did for the first two i.e. memorization. I was floored by the difficulty and got discouraged. This caused me to lose direction and get lazy with studying. I finally realized that taking the two exam route will allow me to ease into Cisco without being inundated with material.

    The certifications you listed certainly seem attainable in three years, but you have to know that life will interfere with those goals as it inevitably does. Good luck to you!
  • pyroflamespyroflames Posts: 34Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    dtlokee wrote:
    It will take as long as it takes, not one second more, not one second less

    <---- That took me 10 years so far.

    Well done there, well realistly MCSE should take about a year.
    Microsoft Certified Professional

    Microsoft Office User Specialist
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