Please help me decide bachelors degree !!!

Hey everyone... I am a member of college board, and i have a couple options for college choices.
I live in Winston Salem, NC and i really want an in-state college to go to.. But i am not limited to other colleges, but i just prefer to stay near home, so i can have extra support from my families.

Anyways, i dont know if you hall have ever heard of UNCG, (university of North Carolina Greensboro), but they are a program that leads to a bachelors degree in Computer Networking/Telecommunications.. I think this will be perfect for me, due to my knowledge of networking with cisco equipment, and the cisco certs i have.

But is really a reputible Bachelors degree, that companies will look at and say man this guy has a degree.. Or will they say, Degree in computer networking ? never heard !!

I am asking this question becuase this is the only college near home , Besides Hampton University, that offers this bachelors degree in Computer Networking/Telecommunications. And most of the universities offer degress in Computer Science ( software and programming, that i am not really interested in ) or Information systems (microsoft stuff i guess, which again I am a cisco guy)..

I other choice of college is NC state, but again they only offer BS in computer science. UNCG offers BS in Computer networking/telecommunications.

Should i go to UNCG, becuase they have the major that i want, which will lead me to a bachelors degree.

But will companies/business notice it, and is it popular as BS in Computer science or BS in information systems ??

thanks for your help.. LOOK BELOW

that will shows that NC state only offers BS in computer science

http://collegesearch.collegeboard.com/search/CollegeDetail.jsp?collegeId=614&profileId=7

ECU (east carolina university)

http://collegesearch.collegeboard.com/search/CollegeDetail.jsp?collegeId=2497&profileId=7

UNCG

http://collegesearch.collegeboard.com/search/CollegeDetail.jsp?collegeId=364&profileId=7
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Comments

  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,160Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    First, go with whatever interest you because you'll be going to school for four years and if it doesn't interest you then you probably will not pay attention. Second, most companies are going to look at what courses you have taken and really just care that you have a degree. On almost every interview I have gone on they have said "so a degree in Computing and Security Technology, what is that?" You can then explain it and most of the employers have been very impressed with my explanation. This is also why I list what courses I have taken on my resume because then they can see what I have done. Any questions they can ask and I can explain what the course covered. I will also say that I have had potential employers look up the program because they hadn't heard of it. Either way, go with what you feel you will enjoy because it is what you'll be doing for the next four years! Good luck!
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  • lildeezullildeezul Posts: 404Member
    thanks...
    yeah your right, its my choice, its my four years.

    what college did u go to ?

    that BS-CST sounds interesting
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  • savior fairesavior faire Posts: 84Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    You will be much better off long term to not concentrate in a technical degree in a discipline such as computer science.
    You should think about taking some technology courses as minors, but majoring in business, finance or economics. You will be much more well rounded and more valuable to the companies you work for and much more promotable.
    I have two four year business degrees, one in Management and the other in Accounting. I have been in systems development since 1973. I also hold numerous Microsoft Certifications including working on one at the moment.
    If you are too focused on technology, you will not be taken too seriously by management.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,171Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Hi,

    I live in the Triad.

    One great thing about the public universities in NC is the local community/technical colleges are fairly well aligned with the core requirements and some degree courses at the universities and you can transfer credits easily. MAJOR $$$$$ savings that many people leave on the table. If you want to stay at/near home, you could take some courses at Forsyth Tech to get the prerequisites out of the way and some of the networking/telecom courses too. You could potentially get a 2-yr degree (which many companies respect if you have experience, which you do), ans use that as a stepping stone to your bachelors.

    I also am a UNCG computer science grad. When I graduated in 2001 they didn't have a "computer networking/telecommunications" degree, and I didn't remember seeing that the last time I was looking at their catalog for master's options. You might want to double-check at the UNCG website to see what they offer. They do have a growing computer science program there and I know the "Information Systems" concentration is attached to the Business school, completely separate from computer science. Maybe they did add networking, I just haven't noticed it. Do yourself a favor, and look at the different school's websites and actually look at what their "Information Systems" courses of study entail. It isn't just "Microsoft" stuff I would wager.

    As far as reputation goes, from what I've seen, a degree is a degree. If you're looking at jobs that require proven real world experience anyway, you wouldn't get turned down if you had "computer networking" vs. "computer science" as a degree, or vice versa. Maybe degree vs no degree would matter in some cases. But as long as you're in an accredited degree program that is relevant to IT in some way I think you'd be fine.

    Good luck
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  • brad-brad- Posts: 1,218Member
    In my experience, the degree has been in a broader field with a "track" - somewhat like a minor, in a specific area. For example my college had a school of Computer and Information Sciences --- within that college were three majors CS (Comp. Sci), IS, and IT. Within each major there were tracks, like netwok security, web publishing...so it wasnt verbalized as "a degree in networking" - as networking isnt really a college like say "business" or "engineering", it is a subject. Your degree would be from the name of the college within the university with a major in whatever field. I hope that makes sense.
  • skrpuneskrpune Posts: 1,409Member
    brad- wrote:
    In my experience, the degree has been in a broader field with a "track" - somewhat like a minor, in a specific area. For example my college had a school of Computer and Information Sciences --- within that college were three majors CS (Comp. Sci), IS, and IT. Within each major there were tracks, like netwok security, web publishing...so it wasnt verbalized as "a degree in networking" - as networking isnt really a college like say "business" or "engineering", it is a subject. Your degree would be from the name of the college within the university with a major in whatever field. I hope that makes sense.
    +1

    Sounds like my situation. I'm going for a BS in Computer Science starting this spring, but my school offers different "flavors" of concentration:
    - computer science (sounds a little redundant I know!) - designed for those intending to go for an advanced degree beyond the BS
    - technical programming - designed for those seeking careers where extensive programming is involved
    - computer security - self-explanatory...
    - information technology - for those going for employment involving web development, computer network design/maintenance

    I'm not really sure what I wanna do long-term career-wise once I get that BS, and part of my inspiration for going back to school is to get my feet wet on IT-related topics so I can get more exposure and figure out what it is that I want to concentrate on. I've so far decided to go with the IT concentration, since it seems to be the broadest and does contain a variety of technology & skills that are (in my opinion) pretty marketable.

    My advice would be to go for the degree that interests you most and don't worry so much about what a potential employer will have to say about it. If you're unsure about what precisely you want to do or concentrate on, then you might be best served by going somewhere with options OR by going to a program that will transfer well to another school if you choose to go elsewhere later for a different concentration.
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  • lildeezullildeezul Posts: 404Member
    blargoe wrote:
    Hi,

    I live in the Triad.

    One great thing about the public universities in NC is the local community/technical colleges are fairly well aligned with the core requirements and some degree courses at the universities and you can transfer credits easily. MAJOR $$$$$ savings that many people leave on the table. If you want to stay at/near home, you could take some courses at Forsyth Tech to get the prerequisites out of the way and some of the networking/telecom courses too. You could potentially get a 2-yr degree (which many companies respect if you have experience, which you do), ans use that as a stepping stone to your bachelors.

    I also am a UNCG computer science grad. When I graduated in 2001 they didn't have a "computer networking/telecommunications" degree, and I didn't remember seeing that the last time I was looking at their catalog for master's options. You might want to double-check at the UNCG website to see what they offer. They do have a growing computer science program there and I know the "Information Systems" concentration is attached to the Business school, completely separate from computer science. Maybe they did add networking, I just haven't noticed it. Do yourself a favor, and look at the different school's websites and actually look at what their "Information Systems" courses of study entail. It isn't just "Microsoft" stuff I would wager.

    As far as reputation goes, from what I've seen, a degree is a degree. If you're looking at jobs that require proven real world experience anyway, you wouldn't get turned down if you had "computer networking" vs. "computer science" as a degree, or vice versa. Maybe degree vs no degree would matter in some cases. But as long as you're in an accredited degree program that is relevant to IT in some way I think you'd be fine.

    Good luck

    Thanks for the info.. Yeah when i looked at the website, i didnt find information about that major.. i will contact the school and find out though. If they dont, I might go for the information systems ? idk, i am also looking at hampton university, and university of pennsylvania ( i know its contradictory to what i said about stayin near home. lol)

    anyways, the only thing about forsyth tech, is that i am a high school wrestler, and the coach at UNCG has some interest in me, so i would hopefully like to get a scholar ship for wrestling at UNCG. and the problem is , if i go to forysth tech, then i wasted two years of wrestling..

    but i will contact them.

    thanks everyone for the inputs.
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  • KasorKasor Posts: 912Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Remember, it is your life and your career. Go with something that you love and like to do, but be reality about that, too.

    Telcom/Network is always good, but be careful and look into the requirement. Rememeber IT always go around and back to Computer Science. Programming skill or knowledge is needed no matter what.

    You cannot call yourself a IT guy if you don't know any programming. You don't need to be expert, but at least know them. Not eveybody can be a good programmer... ! icon_wink.gif
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  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,160Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I went to Drexel University, we're literally a couple of blocks from University of Pennsylvania.

    http://www.drexel.edu/catalog/degree/ct.htm
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  • unerauunerau Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    computer networking is more like a technical degree, i personally went for a double major in computer science and mathematics, takign extra courses in biology and leaning towards Bioinformatics, its hard work, but for the job i want its really good, Also companies will look into the GPA and research or internships you have done. so yeah those are my insights.

    computer networking is not hard, computer science is, or kind of depends on what you want to do i have done research in AI systems so there you go, lots of math. but one thing is for sure youll learn more about networking in CS than that degree you speak of.
    erick
  • BradleyHUBradleyHU Posts: 918Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    the_Grinch wrote:
    I went to Drexel University, we're literally a couple of blocks from University of Pennsylvania.

    http://www.drexel.edu/catalog/degree/ct.htm

    185 credits to get your degree??? wtf!!! i'm assuming thats a tri-mester or quarter school...cuz if thats semesters, then thats wild crazy...
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  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,160Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Yeah we're a quarter school ;)
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  • lildeezullildeezul Posts: 404Member
    OK Course of change ! I have contacted UNCG, and collegeboard had a error on their page. UNCG does not offer a bachelors in computer network/telecommunication.

    So then my next choice was to choose whether i like computer science or information systems operation manageament... I was first leaning towards the management side, becuase in the future , it could plant me a role as the IT manager or CIO.... and the programming in CS doesnt fit me well....

    but looking at what cources you have to take for each undergrad degree, i chose computer science, becuase the cources that fall under computer science are courses that i am very interesting in, such as computer networking, and network security, and cryptography ect. ect....

    So my undergrads degree once i get into college will be in computer Science...

    now, i have some more options... i was thinking about UNC chapel hill, and NC STATE, because they offer computer science degree, and they are like 20 miles from Research triangle Park, which could plant me some good interns....But UNCG's computer science courses best fit me, and are closer to home...

    I think ill see it anyone of the colleges accept me, and if UNCG does, i'll probably go there, but i really leaning towards UNC, and NC STATE becuase of the RTP area.
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  • vColevCole Posts: 1,574Member
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    I went to Drexel University, we're literally a couple of blocks from University of Pennsylvania.

    Computing and Security Technology


    Wow, I like that course layout, makes me almost want to stay in IT! icon_lol.gif
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    lildeezul wrote: »
    OK Course of change ! I have contacted UNCG, and collegeboard had a error on their page. UNCG does not offer a bachelors in computer network/telecommunication.

    So then my next choice was to choose whether i like computer science or information systems operation manageament... I was first leaning towards the management side, becuase in the future , it could plant me a role as the IT manager or CIO.... and the programming in CS doesnt fit me well....

    but looking at what cources you have to take for each undergrad degree, i chose computer science, becuase the cources that fall under computer science are courses that i am very interesting in, such as computer networking, and network security, and cryptography ect. ect....

    So my undergrads degree once i get into college will be in computer Science...

    now, i have some more options... i was thinking about UNC chapel hill, and NC STATE, because they offer computer science degree, and they are like 20 miles from Research triangle Park, which could plant me some good interns....But UNCG's computer science courses best fit me, and are closer to home...

    I think ill see it anyone of the colleges accept me, and if UNCG does, i'll probably go there, but i really leaning towards UNC, and NC STATE becuase of the RTP area.



    The RTP area would be great to try and get an internship with some of the large companies there. Since you are a networking guy you could shoot for an opportunity at Cisco, Verizon Business, AT&T etc etc....

    There are a lot of great job opportunities in the area as well if you decide to stay. I just moved from the area two weeks ago (because of a great job offer, nothing to do with not liking or not enough jobs in the Triangle) and never had any issues finding a job there. A lot of great things to do in your free time downtown Raleigh as well.


    Good luck on which ever school you choose! All three are great schools and I'm sure you will do great with a degree from any of those.
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  • vColevCole Posts: 1,574Member
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    I went to Drexel University, we're literally a couple of blocks from University of Pennsylvania.

    Computing and Security Technology


    Also, I just noticed they offer this online...




    hmm.... icon_cool.gif

    Ouch, @ $575/credit 185*$575 = $106,000+
  • bighuskerbighusker Posts: 147Member
    You will be much better off long term to not concentrate in a technical degree in a discipline such as computer science.
    You should think about taking some technology courses as minors, but majoring in business, finance or economics. You will be much more well rounded and more valuable to the companies you work for and much more promotable.
    I have two four year business degrees, one in Management and the other in Accounting. I have been in systems development since 1973. I also hold numerous Microsoft Certifications including working on one at the moment.
    If you are too focused on technology, you will not be taken too seriously by management.

    Uhm....that really depends what type of job you're talking about. Companies looking for programmers/developers aren't going to look down on people who have computer science degrees. Many of them will actually require one.

    Business majors are a dime a dozen. In general, a business degree does not come close to approaching the rigor of a computer science degree. Not surprisingly, the number of students graduating with CS degrees has been dwindling for quite some time, and it's one of the few remaining fields where the job prospects for recent graduates is still quite strong - College Majors That Will Get You A Job - Forbes.com
    Not surprisingly, any recent graduate with a degree in computer science, information systems or computer engineering has excellent job prospects. Technology is central to every kind of business, so there's demand almost everywhere for professionals who can build networks, design software and serve as IT support staff.

    Unless you have management aspirations, you can go pretty far on a computer science degree alone. Most developers I've worked with have no desire to become managers, and I include myself in that category.
  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,160Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Yeah Drexel isn't cheap, but on the east coast they are extremely well known. Besides someone has to pay for our expansion into California! My program was great because you can transfer just about everything you had from an Associates program and I believe they will give you credit for three courses that relate to a certification:

    Network+, CCNA = Networking I, II, and III
    MCSE/MCSA = Operating System Architecture I, II
    Server+ = Server I
    Security+ = Use to cancel Security I and II, now just I, but if you have it the professors will just make you do the project
    A+ = Microcomputer Hard/Software

    I completed the security track and it was quite amazing. One of our professors helped to write the CISSP exams. The creator of the security track has 20 years of security consulting experience on top of once being a programmer for the government. Another is the just under the CSO of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange (they've been acquired by the NASDAQ) I believe. On top of that all have worked with law enforcement and are members of Infraguard (run by the FBI) and ECTF (run by the Secret Service). I've taken the online courses (in security and networking) the networking I'd suggest having a SIM so you can practice. The security course are all writing intensive and you do real work projects.

    Online Security Courses I took:

    Security and Information Warfare - goes over a ton of security stuff and not just the technical side. I always think of the scene in Live Free or Die Hard when they play the video of all the Presidents giving a speech and the Capitol Building blowing up. The course covered psychological warfare in the technology world (hacktivist). For this course I wrote about 10 to 15 pages (not including endnotes, title page, etc) on a three layer protection plan for wireless.

    Incident Response Best Practices - name says it all. For this course we wrote two papers one for surviving in our homes for 3 days with no utilites and one for a week outside of our homes. We had to map three routes we could take to get out of area/state on top of supplies we would need. We had to price everything out and also had to back up what we were bringing and the amount based on research (FEMA, Department of Interior, scholarly journals). Also, we did plans for responding to DoS attacks, viruses, etc

    IT Security Policies - We wrote policies for a college. Learned best practices, what you can do, what you have to do, and how to do it.

    My favorite courses were Risk Assessment, Disaster Recovery, and Defensive Counter Measures (hacking course). Risk Assessment I was part of the team that did the risk assessment for the Goodwin College of Professional Studies. We talked to the managers of facilities, operations, system administrator, and various other staff members. From there we started the Disaster Recovery based on the information we got from the risk assessment. We didn't get to do it completely due to the fact they weren't going to give us admin passwords and other sensitive information. Defensive Counter Measures was basically the CEH course. We did hands on attacks, discussed and used various tools, and we even had a student who was a computer science major (they have to fight to get to take our courses because the other schools within the college don't have courses like ares and don't want their students switching) who actually wrote his own trojan. Had a very easy to use interface to control the system once infected.

    Overall I loved the program. The professors are great, but Drexel's administration is a pain to deal with. Also, you basically have to plot your own course because I have yet to meet a counselor who was worth much. How someone with a degree in education can tell me what courses in technology will fit well for my goals is beyond me. Also, I'd have approval to take a course from the professor teaching the course and the program manager and still fight them because I didn't have a pre-req that the above two told me was incorrect in the first place and that I would have no issue completing the course. As of today I have received my diploma and boy is it a great feeling! And a 3.41 GPA! Any questions feel free to ask or pm me!
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  • LBC90805LBC90805 Posts: 247Member
    I say, and from personal experiance, to not get a degree that is too narrow in breadth. Like something in Networking or Strictly I.S./I.T./M.I.S!

    Your best bet would be to focus on a degree with a wide scope of subjects such as Business and then a concentration is something else.

    Sush as myself, I got a B.S. in Business Administration with a Concentration in Management Information Systems. I got the big picture covered with Business Admin and the specialization of M.I.S..

    Also Science Degrees such as Computer Science, in Software or Hardware, are also good.
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