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ok, I really do have a new job, for sure thing this time

AldurAldur Member Posts: 1,460
So the offer was finally approved and I have a start date of Feb 9th where I'll be sent to Virgina for a week of training and then off to Canada to live, work for Juniper, and freeze my butt off :D

It'll be some good times!icon_thumright.gif
"Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

-Bender
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    undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    We'll believe it when we see it. :)

    Congratulations! Enjoy the cold air of coldness up there!
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
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    AldurAldur Member Posts: 1,460
    undomiel wrote: »
    We'll believe it when we see it. :)

    Congratulations! Enjoy the cold air of coldness up there!


    haha, you and me both, I'm not gonna believe it until I'm in Virgina sitting in training, then I might allow myself to think its real
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
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    networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Congrats man!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Congrats!! icon_thumright.gif

    ...definitely invest in some good thermal underwear though, it be cold up there!!
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    dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I love how they send you somewhere warmer before bringing you in. I guess they want the change to be as harsh as possible. They should at least send you over to MN to help you ease into things. We have training too! :D

    I'll offer you my tentative congratulations as well icon_thumright.gificon_lol.gif
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    jryantechjryantech Member Posts: 623
    Have you ever lived in Canada?

    I want to move there in about 3 years and was wondering how hard it is/was for you to get your passport and if you are going to apply for citizenship.

    Not sure how all that works...


    btw GRATS :)
    "It's Microsoft versus mankind with Microsoft having only a slight lead."
    -Larry Ellison, CEO, Oracle

    Studying: SCJA
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    LarryDaManLarryDaMan Member Posts: 797
    Congrats!! Don't worry, it's only cold when you go outside. :)
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    KasorKasor Member Posts: 933 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Don't worry IRS will get your next year. Not sure how well you get pay, but don't you have to pay two taxes because of Canada is not part of U.S yet (laugh).

    Have fun and enjoy. I heard Canadian girls are HOT HOT HOT (laugh, too)

    Free housing?
    Kill All Suffer T "o" ReBorn
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    NSSANSSA Member Posts: 14 ■□□□□□□□□□
    jryantech wrote: »
    I want to move there in about 3 years and was wondering how hard it is/was for you to get your passport and if you are going to apply for citizenship.

    The basic procedure is that you flash us a smile and we let you in. We're overly polite people. :D
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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Kasor wrote: »
    Don't worry IRS will get your next year. Not sure how well you get pay, but don't you have to pay two taxes because of Canada is not part of U.S yet (laugh).
    Well...actually you will have to at least file taxes in both countries. The filing for the first tax year (2009) that you relocate will be a little messy but it will get easier after that.

    When I relocated up to Canada mid year, this is how it broke down:
    - Canadian taxes got calculated first. You'll see why in a sec..
    - Canadian Revenue Agency didn't care what happened before I crossed the border. So you only declare your Canadian income in Canada to the CRA, and your deductible limits get prorated by the amount of time you were there for the year - from the time you "landed" to the end of the tax year. So if you're there for 6 months, then the standard deductible gets reduced to 50%.
    - Once you've gotten the Canadian side of things calculated, then calculate the US side. Since you're a US citizen, they want to know everything you've made everywhere in the world because they want their fair share. Declare your US income as usual, then...
    - Have your tax guy/gal calculate the US side TWO ways: taking a foreign tax deduction & excluding foreign income. It will take 5-10 extra minutes to do the calculation both ways, but it WILL pay off. Depending on how much you make & where you fall on the tax tables, one will work out significantly better than the other and both ways are legal. For my tax situation, the foreign tax deduction (deducting the whopping amount of Canadian income taxes we paid from our US taxes) worked out better. I got a refund from the US the first year and had to pay nothing to the US the second year.

    For tax year 2010, it's a bit easier - you calculate the Canadian side first (no prorating assuming you're there for the full tax year), then on the US forms declare $0 US income & do the quickie comparison of foreign tax exclusion vs foreign income exclusion to see which works out best. The tax rates in Canada are much higher than most places in the US, so you probably won't end up having to pay a penny to the IRS for 2010 (again, assuming you end up working up there for the full tax year).

    Find yourself a good tax person. Believe it or not, H&R Block up there was awesome for my US/Canadian taxes. I got hooked up with a guy that was finding deductions where I didn't even know they existed! He rocked. When it comes to tax time next year, just called H&R Block's main line & ask them for recommendations on who to go to that can handle stuff from both sides of the border and then book an appointment and you're golden.

    As far as the legalities of working in Canada...are you getting a work permit? Is the company going to be sponsoring you? Technically, unless you apply for some sort of residency or citizenship, you can only work in Canada on a work permit for a max of 3 years, and that's only if you get a contract/offer letter from your potential employer promising as much. You'll have to pay some fees & submit a pound or two of paperwork, but the work permit process is not so bad.

    Also, are you planning on taking a car with you? If you don't own it outright, then you'll have to get permission from the bank/official owner of record to allow you to basically flee the country with their vehicle. If you do own the car outright, then it's not so bad, just some forms to fill out. I couldn't get permission from my financing companies for my two cars, so I ended up having to sell one (hubby is STILL mourning the loss of his Wrangler nearly 3 years later!) and had to pay off the other by draining our savings (ugh).

    If you have any questions or need any help with forms or info or relocation across the border, let me know - I did the coordination for our temp relocation up there and our return, and I probably still have some forms/notes/links somewhere if you need them.
    Currently Studying For: Nothing (cert-wise, anyway)
    Next Up: Security+, 291?

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    jryantechjryantech Member Posts: 623
    skrpune wrote: »
    As far as the legalities of working in Canada...are you getting a work permit? Is the company going to be sponsoring you? Technically, unless you apply for some sort of residency or citizenship, you can only work in Canada on a work permit for a max of 3 years, and that's only if you get a contract/offer letter from your potential employer promising as much. You'll have to pay some fees & submit a pound or two of paperwork, but the work permit process is not so bad.

    Also, are you planning on taking a car with you? If you don't own it outright, then you'll have to get permission from the bank/official owner of record to allow you to basically flee the country with their vehicle. If you do own the car outright, then it's not so bad, just some forms to fill out. I couldn't get permission from my financing companies for my two cars, so I ended up having to sell one (hubby is STILL mourning the loss of his Wrangler nearly 3 years later!) and had to pay off the other by draining our savings (ugh).

    If you have any questions or need any help with forms or info or relocation across the border, let me know - I did the coordination for our temp relocation up there and our return, and I probably still have some forms/notes/links somewhere if you need them.

    This is what I want to find out...
    After I get my Bachelors I want to try and find a job in British Columbia, but I am afraid that my United States Citizenship will turn off Canadian employers.

    I heard it is 3 years to become a citizen there... To lazy to Google right now :)
    "It's Microsoft versus mankind with Microsoft having only a slight lead."
    -Larry Ellison, CEO, Oracle

    Studying: SCJA
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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    jryantech wrote: »
    This is what I want to find out...
    After I get my Bachelors I want to try and find a job in British Columbia, but I am afraid that my United States Citizenship will turn off Canadian employers.

    I heard it is 3 years to become a citizen there... To lazy to Google right now :)
    yeah, you have to live there for 3 years to apply for citizenship, and you have to be "of good character" and pass a test on Canadian info/history...somewhat similar to gaining citizenship in the US. Americans are sometimes disliked up there for the simple fact that they're American, so you will find some discrimination, and some people will prefer to give jobs to Canadians before Americans - but most people are interested in just filling a position with the best possible candidate, regardless of citizenship.

    Here's a link for you from the CIC about becoming a Canadian citizen, that should get you started.
    Currently Studying For: Nothing (cert-wise, anyway)
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    jryantechjryantech Member Posts: 623
    skrpune wrote: »
    yeah, you have to live there for 3 years to apply for citizenship, and you have to be "of good character" and pass a test on Canadian info/history...somewhat similar to gaining citizenship in the US. Americans are sometimes disliked up there for the simple fact that they're American, so you will find some discrimination, and some people will prefer to give jobs to Canadians before Americans - but most people are interested in just filling a position with the best possible candidate, regardless of citizenship.

    Here's a link for you from the CIC about becoming a Canadian citizen, that should get you started.

    Yeah, I hope it goes smoother than it seems.

    When I heard the company I work for has a Vancouver office, I was so happy. Even though I won't have my Bachelors for two years at least I have some connections with-in the company and experience.

    Something about the weather, lifestyle, hockey and getting away from American politics intrigues me.
    "It's Microsoft versus mankind with Microsoft having only a slight lead."
    -Larry Ellison, CEO, Oracle

    Studying: SCJA
    Occupation: Information Systems Technician
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    mikej412mikej412 Member Posts: 10,086 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I offer my Congratulations! icon_cheers.gif with no reserve :D
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    jryantech wrote: »
    Yeah, I hope it goes smoother than it seems.

    When I heard the company I work for has a Vancouver office, I was so happy. Even though I won't have my Bachelors for two years at least I have some connections with-in the company and experience.

    Something about the weather, lifestyle, hockey and getting away from American politics intrigues me.
    Canadian politics are fascinating to me. I mean, come on - the prime minister can close down parliament & tell them to go on vacation for a while so they don't try to vote him out? And how they yell at each other in parliament? It's downright entertaining!!

    And hockey is a totally different animal up there compared to the US. I'm a hockey fan and I am very happy to say that I was able to score tix to a game while I was up there. Very cool.

    I say start feeling them out for the cross-border transfer thing. If it's something you're interested in and they're willing to do, then great! You can start some planning! If not, then you can start looking into other avenues. It doesn't take 2 years to set this stuff up, but you're definitely going to need 3-6 months of planning & paperwork & wait time to get all your duckies in a row to make a legal cross border move.
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    UnixGuyUnixGuy Mod Posts: 4,564 Mod
    congrats icon_lol.gif
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    Big JizayBig Jizay Member Posts: 269
    Hey congratulations!! icon_biggrin.gif

    That's a great opportunity, working for Juniper!
    The only thing that can stop you is you

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    nelnel Member Posts: 2,859 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Congratulations mate! Enjoy canada!!!
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

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    astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Great news Aldur! I might end up in Edmonton mid-year (is that still where you're headed?) so maybe we can grab a beer, etc.
    LarryDaMan wrote: »
    Congrats!! Don't worry, it's only cold when you go outside. :)
    And that's why Edmonton has underground tunnels... icon_lol.gif
    jryantech wrote: »
    When I heard the company I work for has a Vancouver office, I was so happy.
    If you can get transfered to the Vancouver office it would be super easy from an immigration perspective (work visa, etc). Under NAFTA there are a couple of ways to get 3-5 year work visas easily if it's for an employee transfer. Also any company worth their salt will provide relocation assistance (at least to cover immigration issues) to someone they are recruiting from outside the country.
    skrpune wrote: »
    Canadian politics are fascinating to me. I mean, come on - the prime minister can close down parliament & tell them to go on vacation for a while so they don't try to vote him out? And how they yell at each other in parliament? It's downright entertaining!!
    Don't get me started... ;)

    And if you find Canadian parliament amusing, you should check out the Taiwanese one, there sessions quite often erupt into fistfights - seriously!
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    rossonieri#1rossonieri#1 Member Posts: 799 ■■■□□□□□□□
    congrats aldur,
    good luck mate!!! ;)
    the More I know, that is more and More I dont know.
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    captobviouscaptobvious Member Posts: 648
    Schwing!icon_cheers.gif

    Don't forget your hat and scarf!
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    blargoeblargoe Member Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Awesome. icon_cool.gif
    IT guy since 12/00

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    AldurAldur Member Posts: 1,460
    Thanks for the congrats everyone, it's been along time coming, I've seriously been interviewing at one place or another for the past year so it's finally good to land something :D
    astorrs wrote: »
    Great news Aldur! I might end up in Edmonton mid-year (is that still where you're headed?) so maybe we can grab a beer, etc.

    Yup, still heading for Edmonton and that would be awesome if you were out there mid-year, well have to definitely get together.
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
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    AldurAldur Member Posts: 1,460
    skrpune wrote: »
    Well...actually you will have to at least file taxes in both countries. The filing for the first tax year (2009) that you relocate will be a little messy but it will get easier after that.

    When I relocated up to Canada mid year, this is how it broke down:
    - Canadian taxes got calculated first. You'll see why in a sec..
    - Canadian Revenue Agency didn't care what happened before I crossed the border. So you only declare your Canadian income in Canada to the CRA, and your deductible limits get prorated by the amount of time you were there for the year - from the time you "landed" to the end of the tax year. So if you're there for 6 months, then the standard deductible gets reduced to 50%.
    - Once you've gotten the Canadian side of things calculated, then calculate the US side. Since you're a US citizen, they want to know everything you've made everywhere in the world because they want their fair share. Declare your US income as usual, then...
    - Have your tax guy/gal calculate the US side TWO ways: taking a foreign tax deduction & excluding foreign income. It will take 5-10 extra minutes to do the calculation both ways, but it WILL pay off. Depending on how much you make & where you fall on the tax tables, one will work out significantly better than the other and both ways are legal. For my tax situation, the foreign tax deduction (deducting the whopping amount of Canadian income taxes we paid from our US taxes) worked out better. I got a refund from the US the first year and had to pay nothing to the US the second year.

    For tax year 2010, it's a bit easier - you calculate the Canadian side first (no prorating assuming you're there for the full tax year), then on the US forms declare $0 US income & do the quickie comparison of foreign tax exclusion vs foreign income exclusion to see which works out best. The tax rates in Canada are much higher than most places in the US, so you probably won't end up having to pay a penny to the IRS for 2010 (again, assuming you end up working up there for the full tax year).

    Find yourself a good tax person. Believe it or not, H&R Block up there was awesome for my US/Canadian taxes. I got hooked up with a guy that was finding deductions where I didn't even know they existed! He rocked. When it comes to tax time next year, just called H&R Block's main line & ask them for recommendations on who to go to that can handle stuff from both sides of the border and then book an appointment and you're golden.

    As far as the legalities of working in Canada...are you getting a work permit? Is the company going to be sponsoring you? Technically, unless you apply for some sort of residency or citizenship, you can only work in Canada on a work permit for a max of 3 years, and that's only if you get a contract/offer letter from your potential employer promising as much. You'll have to pay some fees & submit a pound or two of paperwork, but the work permit process is not so bad.

    Also, are you planning on taking a car with you? If you don't own it outright, then you'll have to get permission from the bank/official owner of record to allow you to basically flee the country with their vehicle. If you do own the car outright, then it's not so bad, just some forms to fill out. I couldn't get permission from my financing companies for my two cars, so I ended up having to sell one (hubby is STILL mourning the loss of his Wrangler nearly 3 years later!) and had to pay off the other by draining our savings (ugh).

    If you have any questions or need any help with forms or info or relocation across the border, let me know - I did the coordination for our temp relocation up there and our return, and I probably still have some forms/notes/links somewhere if you need them.


    Skrpune, you have just become my new best friend! :D I have been so worried about the tax issues that I heard rumors about that I might face when I head up there and that cleared up so much of it.

    Juniper is setting up a work visa for me, so I believe that is all taken care of... I think, I'll go check on that. Although, I would like to have duel citizanship since there's a good chance I'll be staying there for more then 3 years. Figure I'll get the work permit first then go for the citizenship after.

    Yup, the wife and I are planning on taking both our cars up there and from what you told me a while ago about that we were able to talk our banks into letting us take them up there. We'd have been in the same spot your where if not, would have had to drain the savings to pay off one and do a quick sale on the other, would have been horrible, you are a lifesave!

    Thanks for the offer of help, you answered my biggest question with the tax thingy but I'm sure I'll have other questions so expect some pm's coming your way :D
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
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    astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Aldur wrote: »
    Although, I would like to have duel citizanship since there's a good chance I'll be staying there for more then 3 years. Figure I'll get the work permit first then go for the citizenship after.
    You're probably looking at permanent residency, aka landed immigrant status in Canada (a "Green Card" in the US) as I don't believe the US government will allow you to gain new citizenship without relinquishing your US citizenship (it works differently if you get dual citizenship by birth than if you apply for non-US citizenship). Essentially be careful. ;)
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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Aldur wrote: »
    Skrpune, you have just become my new best friend! :D I have been so worried about the tax issues that I heard rumors about that I might face when I head up there and that cleared up so much of it.

    Juniper is setting up a work visa for me, so I believe that is all taken care of... I think, I'll go check on that. Although, I would like to have duel citizanship since there's a good chance I'll be staying there for more then 3 years. Figure I'll get the work permit first then go for the citizenship after.

    Yup, the wife and I are planning on taking both our cars up there and from what you told me a while ago about that we were able to talk our banks into letting us take them up there. We'd have been in the same spot your where if not, would have had to drain the savings to pay off one and do a quick sale on the other, would have been horrible, you are a lifesave!

    Thanks for the offer of help, you answered my biggest question with the tax thingy but I'm sure I'll have other questions so expect some pm's coming your way :D
    No prob, happy to help. I spent an ungodly amount of time researching the move there & back, may as well put it to good use.

    One thing you might want to look into is how you can transition from work permit status to applying for permanent citizenship. I never looked too deep into this option since we always knew we were coming back to the US, but I did a quick search & you can extend your stay/become a permanent resident if you meet the criteria, such as being a skilled worker which is sounds like you qualify for. But again, this is about as deep as I've delved into that subject, so it might warrant a call/email. to the CIC to verify so you know what your options are ahead of time.

    If you're a US citizen, then you won't be needing a visa - just a work permit to authorize you to work up there. And your wife will need to apply separately, and she can apply as an accompanying spouse & get an open work permit allowing her to work for just about anyone (with some exceptions, like agriculture, teaching, etc.). If your employer has got this shite together, they will have the forms & procedures downpat...if not, then the CIC website has a link to download the forms & it details the procedures fairly well.

    SO glad you were able to convince your banks to be cooperative!! Hooray for not having to make yourself poor to relocate! icon_thumright.gif I was so totally bummed that I couldn't convince our banks to play along, sigh. I guess they weren't too keen on the idea of letting us run away to a different country with cars that they legally owned and that we owed gobs of money on...you can't exactly extradite someone across the border for defaulting on a car loan, so I can see their resistance.

    Just give me a shout if you need anything or have any questions. Like I said, I did a good chunk of research on this stuff, and I'm more than happy to help out where I can.

    Good luck, and congrats again!!
    Currently Studying For: Nothing (cert-wise, anyway)
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    AldurAldur Member Posts: 1,460
    astorrs wrote: »
    You're probably looking at permanent residency, aka landed immigrant status in Canada (a "Green Card" in the US) as I don't believe the US government will allow you to gain new citizenship without relinquishing your US citizenship (it works differently if you get dual citizenship by birth than if you apply for non-US citizenship). Essentially be careful. ;)

    I heard something about that too. Was talking about it with some guys at work and they said they thought you could keep you US citizenship just as long as the US didn't know you were a canadian citizen. Why in the world would the US care if you were a citizen else where is beyond me...icon_rolleyes.gif
    skrpune wrote: »
    No prob, happy to help. I spent an ungodly amount of time researching the move there & back, may as well put it to good use.

    One thing you might want to look into is how you can transition from work permit status to applying for permanent citizenship. I never looked too deep into this option since we always knew we were coming back to the US, but I did a quick search & you can extend your stay/become a permanent resident if you meet the criteria, such as being a skilled worker which is sounds like you qualify for. But again, this is about as deep as I've delved into that subject, so it might warrant a call/email. to the CIC to verify so you know what your options are ahead of time.

    If you're a US citizen, then you won't be needing a visa - just a work permit to authorize you to work up there. And your wife will need to apply separately, and she can apply as an accompanying spouse & get an open work permit allowing her to work for just about anyone (with some exceptions, like agriculture, teaching, etc.). If your employer has got this shite together, they will have the forms & procedures downpat...if not, then the CIC website has a link to download the forms & it details the procedures fairly well.

    SO glad you were able to convince your banks to be cooperative!! Hooray for not having to make yourself poor to relocate! icon_thumright.gif I was so totally bummed that I couldn't convince our banks to play along, sigh. I guess they weren't too keen on the idea of letting us run away to a different country with cars that they legally owned and that we owed gobs of money on...you can't exactly extradite someone across the border for defaulting on a car loan, so I can see their resistance.

    Just give me a shout if you need anything or have any questions. Like I said, I did a good chunk of research on this stuff, and I'm more than happy to help out where I can.

    Good luck, and congrats again!!

    Yup, I'm a US citizen so it'll be a work permit, I take it that it's easier to get a work permit then a visa. I too was soooo relieved to hear that we were able to take our cars. The move is already costly enough just to move our stuff up there let alone attempt to pay off one of our cars :D

    I think Juniper has all the work permit stuff under control.... I hope. I'll call them on Monday to make sure. Nothing would suck more then to get tripped up by not having a work permit. About how long does it take to get a work permit to come through? Can they be expedited? I could see things getting held up if they hadn't already started it.
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Aldur wrote: »
    I heard something about that too. Was talking about it with some guys at work and they said they thought you could keep you US citizenship just as long as the US didn't know you were a canadian citizen. Why in the world would the US care if you were a citizen else where is beyond me...icon_rolleyes.gif
    In general, the US wants your main allegiance to be to the US and to the US only. If you're a dual citizen and you had to "choose sides" then that could get messy. But I'm only guessing here...

    Aldur wrote: »
    Yup, I'm a US citizen so it'll be a work permit, I take it that it's easier to get a work permit then a visa. I too was soooo relieved to hear that we were able to take our cars. The move is already costly enough just to move our stuff up there let alone attempt to pay off one of our cars :D

    I think Juniper has all the work permit stuff under control.... I hope. I'll call them on Monday to make sure. Nothing would suck more then to get tripped up by not having a work permit. About how long does it take to get a work permit to come through? Can they be expedited? I could see things getting held up if they hadn't already started it.
    Are you paying for the move yourself? If you are, then I totally recommend going the freight route. I used ABF U-Pack (they drop off the trailer end of a truck & you pack it yourself or hire movers to do it and they transport it for you) and they were absolutely wonderful and incredibly well priced and reliable. They took care of EVERYTHING at the border...all I had to do was given them an inventory of our stuff and they got it through customs; I just had to show up at the customs office at the airport & sign some forms, then set up the delivery & VOILA I had my stuff in a trailer in my driveway. I can't say enough good things about them. I used them for my return move as well.

    As far as the work permit timing, officially they will refuse to tell you how long it will take to review/process and there is no way to expedite the process. But you can check on the general review dates here. For me and my husband, it took about 45 days overall to get our permits processed including mailing time, but when I asked they said that it could take 2-3 months.
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    AldurAldur Member Posts: 1,460
    skrpune wrote: »
    In general, the US wants your main allegiance to be to the US and to the US only. If you're a dual citizen and you had to "choose sides" then that could get messy. But I'm only guessing here...

    good guess, if you had duel citizen ship with the US and another country that the US had to go to war against somebody might have allegiance problem.
    skrpune wrote: »
    Are you paying for the move yourself? If you are, then I totally recommend going the freight route. I used ABF U-Pack

    Yup I'm moving myself and as a matter of fact I already have ABF moving me. It was cheaper then renting a uhaul before buying the gas for the trip up. And also the idea of not driving a moving truck and towing my car sat real well with me :D
    skrpune wrote: »
    As far as the work permit timing, officially they will refuse to tell you how long it will take to review/process and there is no way to expedite the process. But you can check on the general review dates here. For me and my husband, it took about 45 days overall to get our permits processed including mailing time, but when I asked they said that it could take 2-3 months.

    hmmm very interesting. So from what I understand it wouldn't be possible for me to work in Canada without a work permit, there's no temporally working until your work permit is approved, is there?
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

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    skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Aldur wrote: »
    Yup I'm moving myself and as a matter of fact I already have ABF moving me. It was cheaper then renting a uhaul before buying the gas for the trip up. And also the idea of not driving a moving truck and towing my car sat real well with me :D
    Ugh, sucks that they're not paying for the move, but same thing happened with my move up there - my hubby's employer didn't fork over anything for the move. And FYI, you CANNOT deduct moving costs from your 2009 taxes on either side of the border (believe me, I tried) so keeping those costs in check is important (unless you really like hemorrhaging money for no good reason!), and ABF is a great start. They're truly wonderful, glad to hear you're already on board with them.
    Aldur wrote: »
    hmmm very interesting. So from what I understand it wouldn't be possible for me to work in Canada without a work permit, there's no temporally working until your work permit is approved, is there?
    Not as far as I know. But you can call & ask them for info...technically since you're asking for info from outside of Canada you need to call your "local" consulate or visa office (considering you're in UT you should probably contact LA or Seattle) but you can try calling the in-Canada call center for some info as well.
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