Depth of Study

cisco_troopercisco_trooper Too manyMember Posts: 1,442 ■■■■□□□□□□
Ok, so I'm cruising through the BCMSN when I get to chapter 13 in the Cert Guide - Router, Supervisor, and Power Redundancy. It isn't too bad just to read through as it is some really useful information, but when I start making flash cards for this chapter, it does not seem to really ever end. I have come up with well over 100 questions for the material in this chapter and I'm not even done yet.

So this question is this - how much do you study certain aspects of the material. This chapter in particular has a plethora of different timers with multiple ranges of valid values (seconds vs. milliseconds). There is probably 50+ different timers, priorities, group numbers, etc, in this chapter. Is everyone really just memorizing ALL of this information. Timers alone are raw data and really aren't much more than plain old memorization.

Just curious about others' methodologies in this aspect of study.

Comments

  • kalebkspkalebksp Member Posts: 1,033 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I think I skipped that chapter, Nuggets and hands on was enough of HSRP, VRRP, and GLBP for me. The rest of that stuff isn't in the Exam Topics so I ignored it. Possibly good information to know, but I had set deadlines to be done with certain exams during my studying and was trying to catch up after having to sit BSCI twice.

    Our study methods are obviously very different (I don't take notes or make flash cards), so my methods may be of limited use to you.
  • mikej412mikej412 Member Posts: 10,086 ■■■■■■■■■■
    There's lots of trivia, but you can figure out what's most important working hands-on.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • cisco_troopercisco_trooper Too many Member Posts: 1,442 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I hear you on the hands on, which has been my traditional method of study. Searching through my posts finding my BSCI material should certainly reveal that. The flash cards are a new thing for me. My goal is to be in constant review of the things I have studied so I don't find myself in this "sit it" and "forget it" exam taking philosophy/methodology where I become incompetent just as fast as I gain competence. I figure this way I'll have less reviewing to do when I move on to CCIE preparation.

    I'm finding it to be fairly rigorous so far, and it is certainly taking away from my hands-on time, so I don't know if I will continue doing this.
  • kalebkspkalebksp Member Posts: 1,033 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I hear you on the hands on, which has been my traditional method of study. Searching through my posts finding my BSCI material should certainly reveal that. The flash cards are a new thing for me. My goal is to be in constant review of the things I have studied so I don't find myself in this "sit it" and "forget it" exam taking philosophy/methodology where I become incompetent just as fast as I gain competence. I figure this way I'll have less reviewing to do when I move on to CCIE preparation.

    I'm finding it to be fairly rigorous so far, and it is certainly taking away from my hands-on time, so I don't know if I will continue doing this.

    Yeah, I know what you mean. I remember very little of the MCSE material since I never worked with Windows Server other than the labs I did. I wish I had the discipline to take notes like that, but it's just not my style. I tried to do it using wiki software, which was kinda nice to be able to search my notes and link to other topics, but it I didn't stick with it. I'd recommend trying out a wiki if you're going to keep taking notes, if you work out a good structure it makes it a lot easier to manage.
  • Mrock4Mrock4 Banned Posts: 2,359 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Hey CT, I hear ya. RP, Power redundancy and all that was not my favorite chapter at all, but it actually came in handy, because right as I was going through that chapter, an issue came up at work with one of our 6500's that required knowledge straight out of the BCMSN book. I got lucky I'm sure but it did help. I would probably limit my scope on that particular chapter to reading through a couple of times, I don't personally think it requires any more for the BCMSN at least.
  • cowood2676cowood2676 Member Posts: 27 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Well, without violating the Cisco NDA, I can tell you that I took the exam a few weeks ago. I too am one that does not want to sit and forget. I found the material in that chapter to be one of minimal value in ALL regards. I finally decided that after I read it twice, that if this ever came up at work I would just get out the book. However, I must admit that going into the exam I was a little scared because I knew I did not know that material as well as all the other. For your own peace you may want to learn it, but I don't think not knowing it will be a deal breaker on the test...
  • BennyLavaBennyLava Member Posts: 60 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Personally I thought HSRP, VRRP, and GLBP were the most interesting topics on the BCMSN. I also had quite a few in depth questions on them on the exam so I would recommend knowing the details pretty well.
  • SepiraphSepiraph Member Posts: 179 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I think the OP signature aptly applied in this case:
    It's simple really; you can memorize a bunch of crap, or you can take the time to learn something
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