Computer Repair Pricing

jetdynamicsjetdynamics Posts: 129Member
I would like to get some opinion on how to tell a co-worker from different department about the cost of his/her request to fix her computer.

Here's the story:

I do have a co-worker from different department that ask me if I can fix her computer at home I told her I can do that but how would I tell her how much it would cost her for me to fix her computer. Im doing this as a part time but not on co-worker and Im a little bit shy of telling her up front the amount would going to cost her , The other thing Im thinking of is I would just tell her after the job is done which might surprised her so which you think is better tell her upfront or after the job has been done.

The other thing I can think of is when I go to her place I can do a diagnose and tell her what needs to be done and tell her how much would it cost her before I proceed. Which Im thinking like its kinda awkward of telling her upfront about the cost. I feel its better she would ask the price when I do a diagnose. So folks let me know whats the nicest way to deal on this situation.

Comments

  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber ■■■■■■■■□□ Posts: 1,480Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Certainly be up front about it, and let them know about the cost before they disconnect the computer and bring it in to work.

    I give co-workers a quick spiel about how we're not allowed to work on home computers on company time so I would have to do it on the side. I mention that I do work on the side if interested at a rate of $75 per hour, and I include a the option for a shop local to us that gives our employees a discount on parts and labor that they can use as well. It can be a bit odd, and I often do run into people who are bit perplexed seemingly, because I say I will be charging them. But it's what you have to do to not be taken advantage of.
  • dynamikdynamik ■■■■■■■■□□ Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    Just tell her up front; you'll avoid a potential hassle.
  • ThunderPipeThunderPipe Posts: 120Member
    How to tell her isn't really the problem. You just want to make sure your company policy doesn't have something against this kind of thing. My company has strict policies against selling anything. Products, services, etc. But back to your question, I normally ask what they want, give them a quick estimate, and be done with it. I have a baseline fee. For coworkers its normally $50 minimum. Depending on what else the job entails, the price gets to fluctuating. I also give a price cap, so they know that it won't go beyond a certain expense. I try to be a bit low on the prices for coworkers because they come back again and again. Plus word of mouth. I'm 1 of 2 IT guys in my office. The ladies love us. icon_cool.gif

    Definitely tell her up front. The last thing you want is to do all the work, give a price, she flips out, pays you anyway, tells everyone you're a jerk, etc.icon_wink.gif

    Hope this helps.
  • jetdynamicsjetdynamics Posts: 129Member
    thanks for the suggestion I will call her back and tell her upfront since I already got the idea of whats her issue, Im doing this outside of our company and not in company time
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Mod Posts: 5,057Mod Mod
    thanks for the suggestion I will call her back and tell her upfront since I already got the idea of whats her issue, Im doing this outside of our company and not in company time



    Even still, some companies have policies that prohibit work exchange etc.. BECAUSE the HR headache when:
    1. The work isn't performed to expectation;
    or
    2. Payment isn't received timely

    Lead to poor morale back at work. So, it's nice you are doing it on your own time.....some companies extend their policies into your downtime. I believe that is the caveat above.


    But as mentioned and you seem to be doing....Always be upfront. Nothing worse then giving up your time and not being paid.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • genXrcistgenXrcist Posts: 531Member
    Definitely do not accept side-job when at work. It's only natural that people will ask you about this stuff while on the clock and that is usually against policy. You're at work to fix the company's tech issues, not to discuss private ones.

    Going forward if anyone asks you about paying you for work, ask them to send you an email to your personal address with a quick rundown of what they are experiencing. Better yet, just hand them a business card and ask them to call after hours. Then in your email, provide them with your pricing and if they really want the help they'll ok the charges and schedule an appt.

    That being said, if you're good and you charge siginificantly less than the competition out there you should have no trouble finding legitimate business.

    p.s. I would look into getting business insurance as well in the even that you accidentally break something via static shock or something. :)
    1) CCNP Goal: by August 2012
  • bjaxxbjaxx Posts: 217Member
    genXrcist wrote: »
    Definitely do not accept side-job when at work. It's only natural that people will ask you about this stuff while on the clock and that is usually against policy. You're at work to fix the company's tech issues, not to discuss private ones.

    Going forward if anyone asks you about paying you for work, ask them to send you an email to your personal address with a quick rundown of what they are experiencing. Better yet, just hand them a business card and ask them to call after hours. Then in your email, provide them with your pricing and if they really want the help they'll ok the charges and schedule an appt.

    That being said, if you're good and you charge siginificantly less than the competition out there you should have no trouble finding legitimate business.

    p.s. I would look into getting business insurance as well in the even that you accidentally break something via static shock or something. :)


    I would stay away from it, if you break it or something isn't working right. She is going to hound you until its fixed. Its not worth the money. I'm not saying its not worth the money to fix computers just co workers who may have easy access to you will end up being a pain in the butt. I generally do whipe/loads for free and leave it at that. That way I wash my hands of it in the future.
    "You have to hate to lose more than you love to win"
  • genXrcistgenXrcist Posts: 531Member
    bjaxx has a point, that the colleague turned client could potentially hound you in regards to the issue. My solution would be to have them sign a Invoice that states the work requested has been performed to their satisfaction and that any future questions or requests in regards to said work shall be considered a new, chargeable service request. :)
    1) CCNP Goal: by August 2012
  • Vogon PoetVogon Poet Posts: 291Member
    Lots of good advice here.
    The only thing I would add is that, in addition to telling her the cost up front, you might want to give her an idea of comparable labor prices from computer repair businesses (e.g. Geek squad, etc.). If you're giving her a good deal, she might not fully appreciate that unless she knows what it costs at a retail repair store.
    No matter how paranoid you are, you're not paranoid enough.
  • steve_fsteve_f ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 97Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I have had requests like this too. I naively did a repair once, and charged £30 per hour. what I didn't realise was this person then thought they owned me, and I became responsible in their eyes for every error they had on the PC forever after.

    Taking their money made me feel like a commodity that could be bought. What if someone I didn't like asked me to help them? Can I turn them down without offending them, even though I am not turning down other people?

    Second, I am trying to promote that I do more than fix computers. I maintain the network, keep business systems secure and up to date, try to improve processes, and am trying to play down the computer repair side of things. (Everything is under warranty so I don't really fix much anymore anyway)

    I have been asked to fix home computers a few times (for money) but I told one person I simply didn''t have the time, and another more persistant person that I wouldn't be able to take time away from my family for less than £120 per hour, minimum 1 hour charge. Thankfully they didn't call my bluff.
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