Build a server from scratch documentation

phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself...Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
Is there any documentation available that details the build of a Windows 2003 Server from start to finish? This includes hardware build and os config. I know its a tall order but anything helps. Thanks.

Comments

  • phantasmphantasm Posts: 995Member
    phoeneous wrote: »
    Is there any documentation available that details the build of a Windows 2003 Server from start to finish? This includes hardware build and os config. I know its a tall order but anything helps. Thanks.

    Have you ever built a regular computer? It's basically the same, only the components may be different. It all depends on whatt he server is used for. You may need ECC RAM, Multi multi-core processors, mass amounts of storage, the list goes on. It all depends on its use.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Posts: 5,057Mod Mod
    phoeneous wrote: »
    Is there any documentation available that details the build of a Windows 2003 Server from start to finish? This includes hardware build and os config. I know its a tall order but anything helps. Thanks.

    Depends on your budget can be a wide spectrum of hardware options. Some of the workstations I build are better then some of our clients Servers...just depends what you need.


    Chassis
    PS
    MOBO
    Optical Drive
    CPU/RAM appropriate for your MOBO
    RAID Controller (if you want, but why wouldn't you)
    HDD for your RAID

    Assemble
    Set BIOS
    Install NOS
    Configure and go.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    phantasm wrote: »
    Have you ever built a regular computer? It's basically the same, only the components may be different. It all depends on whatt he server is used for. You may need ECC RAM, Multi multi-core processors, mass amounts of storage, the list goes on. It all depends on its use.

    Ive built well over a hundred pc's. Obviously the content is the same, Im looking for actual documentation.
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    I guess I'm still not clear on what you're looking for. If you want to get better acquainted with server parts, check out the Server+ Bible. You can get it on Amazon for $5 used. For MS documentation, check out Microsoft TechNet: Resources for IT Professionals
  • ally_ukally_uk Posts: 1,146Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Or a server+ book perhaps?
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • PashPash Posts: 1,601Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    the docs actually provided by the server hardware manufacturers normally help. Its normally quiet intuitive and after you have built a few you wont need to read anything.The OS builds varies on requirements, RAID setup, partition sizes and so on.

    By basic build would be something like this:-

    OS partition C: - 40GB
    Swap Drive (Virtual memory drive) S: - (use MS's VM calculation guide - the normal recommendation of 1.5 times the amount of RAM in the computer/server is a good place to start)
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Hmmm, a quick google turned up a promising book that might be what you are looking for:

    Windows Server 2003: Best Practices for Enterprise Deployments (Tips & Technique)

    The problem is that a 2003 Server checklist or "build" will always (not sometimes, but always) depend on what you want it to do and what environment it is in. Will it be a web server, a domain controller, a RRAS server, a file server, or will it run a custom application? Is it in a workgroup or domain? Is it on your LAN for private use or in a DMZ for public access? Will it need to run its own firewall? Will it serve 10 people or 10,000? There are too many variables, thus the best thing to do is first determine what it will do and for how many users. Then find out from Microsoft (since you said Server 2003 I assume Windows) the minimum and recommended hardware configuration based on it's use (SQL, Exchange, DC, etc). Once you have the hardware requirements in hand you can build your server (or buy it).

    Then, you need to check Microsoft and third party documentation for best practices based on whatever function it will be used. There will be documentation for security, for performance, for redundancy, for backup/recovery, etc. Then finally you wil still need to customise it for whatever environment it will be in. A server used in a small 10 person office might just sit on someones desk, while a server in a large office building might be in a locked closet, and yet that same server on a military installation will be locked in a rack, will not have a floppy drive, the USB ports will be disabled for mass storage devices (no thumb drives), it will be in a locked server room, in a restricted Operations Center on an installation guarded by Marines with M16's...

    However, if you do find what you are looking for please post back - I'd be very interested in such documentation.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • PC509PC509 CISSP, CEH, CCNA: Security/CyberOps, Sec+, CHFI, A+, Proj+, Server+, MCITP Win7, Vista, MCP Server 2 Oregon, USPosts: 771Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Like the others have said, it all depends. Quality is a huge part. If it is a small home server, it wouldn't need much. But, for a office setting, you would need more. If you do large file transfers, you would need a Gb instead of a 100Mb NIC and switch (not need, but recommended). The motherboard and processor depends on your budget and needs. If you are not going to use SCSI, you don't need a MB with that.

    If you are looking for a SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) style document, I'd also recommend a good Server+ book. It would probably have all the information you need.

    As for the OS installation, it can be very simple or VERY complicated depending on your needs. And there are 1000's of books dedicated to everything in between.

    So, as it is, it is pretty much dependant on your needs. But, if you want the only very basics: as in "Install Motherboard, CPU, RAM. Install HDD, blah blah" without the specifics of the models and vendors, I am not sure of any. It is pretty much the same as any other PC build. Just using server hardware that is built for long term usage and 24/7 operation. But, as before, the OS is going to be pretty user specific as to your needs.

    Let us know what you come up with, or what your plans are for the server and we should be able to help out some more. Good luck!
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I think you guys misunderstood me. Im not looking for this information because I dont know how to do it, its just for reference purposes. I know how to build servers, I just want to add it to my library. Thanks anyway.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    I think you guys misunderstood me. Im not looking for this information because I dont know how to do it, its just for reference purposes. I know how to build servers, I just want to add it to my library. Thanks anyway.

    Not at all, I know you know. Maybe you misunderstood our comments, we're not belittling your querey, just offering suggestions and whatnot. But like I said - if you find anything interesting let us know.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    sprkymrk wrote: »
    Not at all, I know you know. Maybe you misunderstood our comments, we're not belittling your querey, just offering suggestions and whatnot. But like I said - if you find anything interesting let us know.

    Thank you. Im surprised at how much information isnt out there. Im talking detailed information like choosing an appropriate battery back cache, or advanced array configurations, or choosing optimal core hardware. Sure anyone can piece together a box but if you are looking for something enterprise level, I think youre stuck with vendor specific tyranny er I mean brochures. Im sure we have some hp proliant stuff laying around at work. We just virtualized almost everything in the house so theres got to be a manual or two there. If I find something I'll post it here.
  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Member
    phoeneous wrote: »
    Im talking detailed information like choosing an appropriate battery back cache, or advanced array configurations, or choosing optimal core hardware. Sure anyone can piece together a box but if you are looking for something enterprise level, I think youre stuck with vendor specific tyranny er I mean brochures.
    We go for vendor specific tyranny. We want something that is fully supported by the manufacturer. Uptime and support are probably the two most important aspects for us.

    If we have a project then we just call our IBM account manager with a minimum spec and what the box is for. They then go talk to one of their consultants to work out what we need. If anything doesn't work or breaks then we just call IBM Global Support and shout at them until its fixed...

    For software we do the same with whoever sold us the software.
  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber Posts: 1,480Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    ...I think youre stuck with vendor specific tyranny er I mean brochures.

    This is big reason why you're having difficulty finding what you're looking for, because it's all vendor specific in the enterprise for the most part. Each vendor has it's own products that are made in their own way, different enough to not have a one size fits all handbook on how to do it. We use HP for the most part where I currently work, it's fairly easy to determine what features we need and what some of the enterprise level components perform or how they benefit us from their website - but if there are any unique parameters required in a configuration that we aren't comfortable selecting (because of our lack of knowledge on HP's SKU's) then we just refer to our rep at CDW and they will communicate our needs and questions to their HP Server guru.

    As unfortunate as it may seem that one can become locked into a specific vendor, it's actually better for reasons tiersten pointed out. I've had the misfortune of being on both ends of the whitebox server in the enterprise realm (both as a salesperson and later as the administrator) and it was NOT pretty in either instance as support was incredibly difficult. You get a server that it supposed to be able to work properly with all of the components included, if a problem arises it's their issue to sort out. If a PSU fails in one of our mission critical HP servers, we get a new PSU in our hands in 4 hours or less for a relatively small fee over 3 years (and hopefully PSU #2 doesn't fail during those 4 hours) - with a whitebox, we'd spend 4 hours trying to get a power supply simply on it's way to us.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    This is big reason why you're having difficulty finding what you're looking for, because it's all vendor specific in the enterprise for the most part. Each vendor has it's own products that are made in their own way, different enough to not have a one size fits all handbook on how to do it. We use HP for the most part where I currently work, it's fairly easy to determine what features we need and what some of the enterprise level components perform or how they benefit us from their website - but if there are any unique parameters required in a configuration that we aren't comfortable selecting (because of our lack of knowledge on HP's SKU's) then we just refer to our rep at CDW and they will communicate our needs and questions to their HP Server guru.

    As unfortunate as it may seem that one can become locked into a specific vendor, it's actually better for reasons tiersten pointed out. I've had the misfortune of being on both ends of the whitebox server in the enterprise realm (both as a salesperson and later as the administrator) and it was NOT pretty in either instance as support was incredibly difficult. You get a server that it supposed to be able to work properly with all of the components included, if a problem arises it's their issue to sort out. If a PSU fails in one of our mission critical HP servers, we get a new PSU in our hands in 4 hours or less for a relatively small fee over 3 years (and hopefully PSU #2 doesn't fail during those 4 hours) - with a whitebox, we'd spend 4 hours trying to get a power supply simply on it's way to us.

    While youre $.02 are admirable, you totally missed the joke. Of course its all vendor specific, what else would it be in the enterprise?
  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber Posts: 1,480Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    While youre $.02 are admirable, you totally missed the joke. Of course its all vendor specific, what else would it be in the enterprise?

    I'm sorry, but I took your comment more as a sarcastic remark and that you were upset that you were stuck with a particular vendor. Your response back however is interpreted as fairly condescending, and rude - why ask for input if you're just going to get bent out of shape about it.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I'm sorry, but I took your comment more as a sarcastic remark and that you were upset that you were stuck with a particular vendor. Your response back however is interpreted as fairly condescending, and rude - why ask for input if you're just going to get bent out of shape about it.

    How am I getting bent out of shape? I even complimented you on your input, I didnt ridicule it. I wasnt trying to be rude so dont take it that way. Like I said you totally missed the joke.
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