How to you put the title MCSA in you resume?

puertorico123puertorico123 Member Posts: 95 ■■□□□□□□□□
ok:
MCSA:Server 2003 with security
MCSA:2003-messenger
MCSA:security in server 2003
MCSA 2003-messenger
how to you write in you resume?
HOLD:
Comptia A+
Comptia Network+

2009 Plan:
MCSA...75%
CCENT....0%
70-648..0%

2010 Plan:
MCITP
ORACLE

Comments

  • tim100tim100 Member Posts: 162
    Next to your name on your resume put (First Name)(Last Name), MCSA

    Then in your resume put the details under something like:

    Certifications:
    MCSA:Server 2003 with Security
    etc...
  • aaronchristensonaaronchristenson Member Posts: 261 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Since I have both 2000 and 2003 but not the security or messenger parts, I list it just MCSA under my name at the top. I list all the individual certifications under eductaion and certification section as Microsoft Certified Systems Adminstrator 2003, Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator 2000 as well as all the others that I have completed.
    Aaron
    MCSE Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA Windows Server 2012, MCSA SQL Server 2012/2014, MCSA Windows 10, MCITP Server Admin, Security+, Virtualization with Windows Server Hyper-V and System Center Specialist
  • puertorico123puertorico123 Member Posts: 95 ■■□□□□□□□□
    i got to: MCSA:2003~Security or MCSA:2003 with Security
    HOLD:
    Comptia A+
    Comptia Network+

    2009 Plan:
    MCSA...75%
    CCENT....0%
    70-648..0%

    2010 Plan:
    MCITP
    ORACLE
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    Microsoft lists the specializations as MCSA: Security on Windows Server 2003 and MCSA: Messaging on Windows Server 2003. I would list them that way. If you're putting the title next to your name, such as on a business card or email signature, just list it as MCSA: Security or MCSA: Messaging and leave the "on Windows Server 2003" part off. (I shortened it for my profile because it's not an "official listing".)

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  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    tim100 wrote: »
    Next to your name on your resume put (First Name)(Last Name), MCSA

    Seriously?

    You guys don't really put vendor/industry certifications after your names do you?

    Although people at this forum might be very interested and supportive of your accomplishment, no one else is impressed, and even PhD has become so watered-down these days that it doesn't carry the sense of authority that it once did.

    In many countries and some US states, various post-nominal letters are legally controlled, and there is often a clear order of precedence established.

    In the US, use only legally regulated post-nominal letters, which are generally reserved for licenses to practice a profession, such as CPA.

    To the OP: List MCSA on your resume in a section pertaining to education and certifications. List it the way Microsoft lists it on your transcript.

    MS, (many arrangements of letters that no one understands)
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    I don't put my certs next to my name on a day-to-day basis. The only times I've ever had the occasion for it was for an article I wrote, relating to IT, and very briefly listing them in my email signature when my employer at the time was trying to soothe the worried little heads of one of our clients who liked to see that sort of thing. You target the specific audience you want to reach with relevant information; in this case, it happens to be other IT folk or people easily soothed by acronyms next to a persons name. Otherwise, you're definitely right, it's something to list in a resume or in your bio on the back of a book you've written.
    eMeS wrote: »
    even PhD has become so watered-down these days that it doesn't carry the sense of authority that it once did.
    I tend to disagree with this as a blanket statement. Someone with a PhD in a field that doesn't necessarily have a straightforward meaning, like pop culture for example, may not be taken as seriously as someone with a PhD in astrophysics or applied mathematics. There are a lot more people walking around with the prefix Dr. than there used to be, and we no longer think of someone with a graduate degree as a superhuman genius in a lab coat, saving the world one beaker of experimental rocket-fuel at a time, that's true. I do believe, however, that the novelty of doctors, (also read "scientists" in the post-WWII era,) wore off, but the prestige of dedicating that much of your life to study, research, and/or either private or academic work is still relevant.

    I work with two people who have PhDs in computer science. While they don't demand we call them Doctor to their faces, they list it on their business cards and anywhere else their names show up. Neither one makes a big deal out of grad school or the work they did there, but listening to them talk about it and reading their papers is absolutely mind-blowing. I don't think PhDs have lost the weight they carry, I think they've just gotten a bit more normalized for the general public, not so fantastical as they once were.

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  • puertorico123puertorico123 Member Posts: 95 ■■□□□□□□□□
    i read title after the name, like MBA (waoo, jajaja) i starter my doctoral degree in the next semester, (if my work leave me a new schedule). but it not a PhD, is a DBA.
    HOLD:
    Comptia A+
    Comptia Network+

    2009 Plan:
    MCSA...75%
    CCENT....0%
    70-648..0%

    2010 Plan:
    MCITP
    ORACLE
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,664 Admin
    I only put certs after my name in a context where they are known. In an Information Security situation, I put "CISSP, SSCP" after my name because those certs are identifiable to other people in the same context. The same would hold true for certifications and degrees in other contexts, such as MCSE, CCIE, MBA, CPA, MS, BA, etc.

    When it comes to resumes, put both the acronym and full spelling the certification. Most recruiters use pattern matching programs to sift for keywords in resumes. One recruiter might be looking only for "Microsoft Certified Professional" and another looking for "MCP" only. And don't expect a recruiter to understand that having an MCSA or MCSE implies that you are also an MCP. Put it all down and spell it all out.
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,313
    eMeS wrote: »
    Seriously?

    You guys don't really put vendor/industry certifications after your names do you?

    Although people at this forum might be very interested and supportive of your accomplishment, no one else is impressed, and even PhD has become so watered-down these days that it doesn't carry the sense of authority that it once did.

    In many countries and some US states, various post-nominal letters are legally controlled, and there is often a clear order of precedence established.

    In the US, use only legally regulated post-nominal letters, which are generally reserved for licenses to practice a profession, such as CPA.

    To the OP: List MCSA on your resume in a section pertaining to education and certifications. List it the way Microsoft lists it on your transcript.

    MS, (many arrangements of letters that no one understands)

    Nothing wrong with doing that in my opinion, although I do think you can overcook things with a very long alphabet after your signature and/or using it in everyday communication. But having earned the designations it's really up to the individual to decide if they wish to add the moniker. Outside the IT space the designations are somewhat unknown but not by everyone so it can sometimes be quite helpful to display them.
  • malcyboodmalcybood Member Posts: 900 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Just list the certs in your CV/resume in a certs section, as there's no point in repeating the same thing twice in a CV i.e. after your name then again in a certs section. General format of a cv is something along the lines of below;

    Contact details
    Summary
    Technical Skills
    Personal skills
    Certifications
    Education
    Work History

    As for putting them in an email signature - depends on what cert you put in but if you just list all of your cets? oh man gimmee a break! Acceptable imo to list a CCIE or JNCIE# or if your're CISSP and I know a CISSP and CCIE who have it on their business cards but anything other than that is a bit of a joke.

    No disrespect to the A+ cert but I've had engineers from Dell listing that in email signatures to me and my immediate reaction was who cares?

    One of our partner companies MD has actually banned anyone putting their certs in email signatures.
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