Mounting a SMB Share, what is the best command?

JockVSJockJockVSJock Posts: 1,118Member
I'm reviewing to take Linux+ in the next few weeks.

I've discovered that there are two ways to mount a Samba share:
smbmount //servername/sharename /mountdirectory -o username=mywindowsusername, password=mywindowspassword 

smbount -t smbfs //servname/sharename/mountdirectory -o username=mywindowsusername, password=mywindowspassword

The second one is using -t flag to set the smb file system. So them seem to me that they do the same thing, correct?
***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

"Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
-unknown

Comments

  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Posts: 1,118Member
    Found the answer:

    Welcome to JustLinux: Wanna learn Linux?
    
    Mounting the Share
    
    To mount an smbfs share from a Linux workstation at the command line, you can use either the smbmount command or use mount -t smbfs. Both command will work the same. When you use mount -t smbfs, the mount program actually passes the command over to smbmount for execution. Throughout this document I'll use smbmount instead of mount -t smbfs.
    
    An example would look like this:
    
    smbmount //servername/sharename /mountdirectory -o username=mywindowsusername,password=mywindowspassword
    
    The mount equivelant is:
    
    mount -t smbfs //servername/sharename /mountdirectory -o username=mywindowsusername,password=mywindowspassword
    
    

    Believe the smbmount -t smbfs is incorrect in the example that I am studying...

    thanks
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned
    When in doubt, check the man pages: smbmount

    It appears that that's a typo. Do you have the errata for the book you're using?
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