Symmetric and Asymmetric Encryption

veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
Hello everyone,

As you know I am gearing up to take the Security+ very soon. I am trying to learn about encryption (emphasis on trying.) Does this some things up well?

Symmetric uses the following
: AES, DES, 3DES, Blowfish, IDEA, and the Rivest Ciphers


Asymmetric uses the following: RSA, Diffie-Hellman, El Gamal, and elliptic curve
Currently working on: Linux and Python

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    SHA and MD are hashing algorithms, not encryption algorithms.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    dynamik wrote: »
    SHA and MD are hashing algorithms, not encryption algorithms.

    Thanks Dynamik, I was tired while reading and typing... Asleep at the wheel. sleeping.gif I skipped a line while reading the ExamCram2 book. icon_lol.gif

    I am correcting my first post if you could look at it. icon_confused.gif:
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Member Posts: 2,008
    You're also going to want to know the difference between the two (I'm sure you know) and how they work. Confidentiality is provided by encrypting with the public key, but authenticity (digital signature) is provided by encrypting with the sender's private key.
    Currently reading:
    IPSec VPN Design 44%
    Mastering VMWare vSphere 5​ 42.8%
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Member Posts: 2,008
    My notes also say to know what a hash collision is.
    Currently reading:
    IPSec VPN Design 44%
    Mastering VMWare vSphere 5​ 42.8%
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    My notes also say to know what a hash collision is.

    I had never heard of a hash collision before. Thanks.

    Hash table - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • abefromanabefroman Banned Posts: 278
    I had never heard of a hash collision before. Thanks.

    Hash table - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    You can practice with GPG asymmetric encryption here:
    FreeGPG.org

    I created freegpg.org in my current study for the Security+
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Looks better. Be sure you understand that DH is used for key exchange, and the end result is symmetric encryption. That might trip you up if you're not familiar with it. That's used for things like IPSec.

    And yes, collisions occur when different input produces the same hashes. This is more common for MD5 than SHA1 because of the smaller size. It's not impossible for it to occur with SHA1 though, and you typically see both listed because the odds are even smaller that they will both produce collisions simultaneously.
  • DarrilDarril Member Posts: 1,588
    Great thread on cryptography.

    Just to add a few things....

    Understanding the basics (like the security triad CIA) is important. Confidentiality (the C in the CIA security triaty) is enforced with encryption with cryptogrpahy.

    I posted this blog a while ago on ecnryption basics that may be useful:
    http://sy0201.blogspot.com/2009/10/encryption-basics-for-security.html

    On symmetric, I don't see AES in your list. This is a big one. It's the current standard and is being used quite a bit today. It's strong and efficient and would be used instead of AES and DES.

    You should also understand that symmetric uses only one key for both encryption and decryption, and that asymmetric uses two keys (public and private key matched key pairs where data encrypted by one key can be decrypted by the matching key).

    I don't see SSL on the list but it is also important. It uses both symmetric and assymmetric. This blog entry talks about the SSL process and may help to understand the difference between asymmetric and symmetric.

    Security Plus: Get Certified Get Ahead: SSL, OCSP vs CRL

    Digital Signatures provide integrity, authentication, and non-repudication and depend on asymmetric encryption. I just posted this blog entry that talks about that process that you may find useful.
    Security Plus: Get Certified Get Ahead: Digital Signatures

    Collisions are associated with hashing - used for integrity (the I in CIA). That might be a great source for another thread.

    Darril Gibson
    Author: CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead
    www.sy0-201.com

    Security+ Blog
    Security Plus: Get Certified Get Ahead

    Security+ Tip of day Tweets
    twitter.com/DarrilGibson
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Thanks everyone. I think I am at last beginning to understand encryption. :)
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    abefroman wrote: »
    You can practice with GPG asymmetric encryption here:
    FreeGPG.org

    I created freegpg.org in my current study for the Security+

    I actually use The GNU Privacy Guard - GnuPG.org
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • abefromanabefroman Banned Posts: 278

    freegpg.org used the gnu binary via a php shell_exec, do you do your encrypt from the Linux command line?

    What is your public key?

    Mine is:
    BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK
    Version: GnuPG v1.4.5 (GNU/Linux)

    mQGiBErgkdgRBACBPltJFeAkhONundeuR/eAF3SqtwkPHWCq44m/NBgvKII10PDC
    Xv7JSCzX3m2gUxtUdGuvEUo7e2iRrs1JWW7cT4FNXO64w+pUpqHzGQOKwz3a58cK
    w5+FVQYMw7rEjLNF2xem4F2lAV7wyoHuNcdnYHRhjiDfg+r1F8MIi489bwCghWrk
    fydSQRD6YibRec6WoR/khVsD/iY0RifqhLd17fiND1UWs+6EOawmFh1YRRd0zP26
    eeJLCxhGuyHEumRuJcvC6J05WA2rwWpMz0TCt5xnyHxs70/5SnP1iVjs0HE6dphD
    J0Ff2P7HbjZtxGegAnZI32Eoi6/TZiXKK9BYhJE1XjSWy6Wa0K7sUEp2abpOdJee
    GXiSA/9/RXTikIeT04MuCGXHzCAoBg+bskGKnCwXKNGpGOEC4bUGWyzVF7h1uSTJ
    BTpKtPewfYb4PiESGIFJ8xSwsHozQlMq3+OCupaE56IWLpVyINsSnaMhyGDZQz+x
    D3RE15gDcJAmY8LrFLaJHfpp3Ky+atoRdeKMx2PmJKYsW7YFP7QdR1BHIENyeXB0
    IDxuaWNrZ0BjaGlob3N0LmNvbT6IYAQTEQIAIAUCSuCR2AIbIwYLCQgHAwIEFQII
    AwQWAgMBAh4BAheAAAoJEBSzhOleAfIU3/QAnRxaCbp/bbF9F0IdMfm+9QV33jwG
    AJ4yQWXWeZAZAJ1pCLPvB8eY8S1RpLkBDQRK4JHYEAQAhrv4m2mqwd6JNp/DgpSN
    dOjxAJoOKhcGpHQ9cZpskmLnpD0IlHEdU1PsUpAdRmnTNEOxexc73etT2SbgedNG
    b/bVR+Qtnvd7WkTwXBHMQz3q6efsTgGXI/+KYl1lq2Qp2KUo8Wk9+LXlCAnWQJsG
    vCMSYFPlFzIyp7RDazm51BcAAwUD+gMKegLfpTc1wUGkSLuGD02CqYgTdYFAsxP4
    n7QYSw5eaSj/cIv1fIGQYtQZAkLqqPi7si+Krqi0lt3EupWo6DSHUtb+Tfw1pNs8
    ICQj6bn9jiLlXo84r86G5qQEIuN30FzMiFQTJoiEBvcz3Yi8RedyfGMZVCitk109
    oTaLwDGOiEkEGBECAAkFAkrgkdgCGwwACgkQFLOE6V4B8hRLEwCbBoWbvYGVwBGp
    j8o1nUerpwg8NKYAnRbGG4GdXtH4JKC2nte0q3P+JAEs
    =aoPQ
    END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK
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