Auto QoS Trust Boundaries

BosefusBosefus Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
What exactly are Auto QoS trust boundaries?

From my googling, I can only conclude that they tell whether or not to trust QoS marking passed on from other devices, however I though that QoS marking were local to the router and not passed along.

QoS in Switches: CoS Trust Boundaries | NetworkWorld.com Community

I realize that article talks about switches, but its the only article I could find that references trust boundaries and actually gives a definition of what they are.

Thanks for the help!
Working on CCNP, passed BSCI, Currently working on ONT.

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I'm going to take a stab at this since I'm just getting into this now, but I'm not 100% sure.

    I believe trust boundary simply refers to where a trusted network meets a non-trusted network. You want to define these areas, so that untrusted traffic isn't able to set it's priority inside of your trusted network.

    Trust settings are defined on each interface, so they're not restricted to a local router. You can also configure Layer-2-to-Layer-3 (CoS-to-ToS) mappings, so you can maintain your QoS settings across layer-2 and layer-3 devices.

    There are variations on the auto qos command, which are all macros that execute a group of commands. You'll have to research each specific one to see what trust settings it configures.
  • ColbyGColbyG Member Posts: 1,264
    Bosefus wrote: »
    What exactly are Auto QoS trust boundaries?

    From my googling, I can only conclude that they tell whether or not to trust QoS marking passed on from other devices, however I though that QoS marking were local to the router and not passed along.

    QoS in Switches: CoS Trust Boundaries | NetworkWorld.com Community

    I realize that article talks about switches, but its the only article I could find that references trust boundaries and actually gives a definition of what they are.

    Thanks for the help!

    Markings are definitely not local to the router/switch. You need to go back to the basics.

    A trust boundary is simply the point where markings are trusted and not rewritten, between a Cisco phone and Cisco switch, for example.
  • APAAPA Member Posts: 959
    The explanation is in the term "Trust Boundary"

    The point at which your network or another network decides whether it is going to 'trust' incoming markings blindly or re-write them to my QoS policies.

    CCNA | CCNA:Security | CCNP | CCIP
    JNCIA:JUNOS | JNCIA:EX | JNCIS:ENT | JNCIS:SEC
    JNCIS:SP | JNCIP:SP
  • BosefusBosefus Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the help guys.

    Really starting to like to QoS stuff.
    Working on CCNP, passed BSCI, Currently working on ONT.
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