Need replies desperately

kaximkaxim Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
I have this question for which i need the answer desperately.

- What scope does one has after becoming a CISSP ASSOCIATE ? I met an IT guru, he is a CCIE and works as an IP Architect. He suggested me that becoming an ASSOCIATE is not really a nice idea and that i should go for CCSP, get 5 years Security experience and then become a FULL CISSP instead of the Associate thing. He thinks that its hard to get 5 year experience of 2 domains as your job description usually branches out and you dont really stay on the track.

Please Comment.

Comments

  • UnixGuyUnixGuy SABSA, GCFA, GPEN, CISM, RHCE, Security+, Server+, eJPT, CCNA Posts: 4,049Mod Mod
    kaxim wrote: »
    I have this question for which i need the answer desperately.

    - What scope does one has after becoming a CISSP ASSOCIATE ? I met an IT guru, he is a CCIE and works as an IP Architect. He suggested me that becoming an ASSOCIATE is not really a nice idea and that i should go for CCSP, get 5 years Security experience and then become a FULL CISSP instead of the Associate thing. He thinks that its hard to get 5 year experience of 2 domains as your job description usually branches out and you dont really stay on the track.

    Please Comment.


    What's your current job description ?
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,476Admin Admin
    kaxim wrote: »
    - What scope does one has after becoming a CISSP ASSOCIATE ?
    Being a CISSP Associate of the (ISC)2 indicates that you have passed the CISSP exam and are a dues-paying member of the (ISC)2. You will not be CISSP-certified until you have collected the requisite 4-5 years of professional work experience in (at least) two CISSP CBK domains, have an endorsement from a fellow (ISC)2 member, and have passed a prerequisites audit by the (ISC)2. All of this information is at www.isc2.org.

    The "Associate" designations are to help people get a foot in the door at being an InfoSec professional. It's an excellent first step for people that don't yet have the experience, but it won't necessarily get you hired as an InfoSec pro.
  • kaximkaxim Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    @ Unix guy:
    I just graduated and have no job or experience.

    @JD: thanks for the reply. i know this place which hires CISSP Associates and makes them work in the field of Digital Forensic. does that cover any two domains. pardon me for my ignorance
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,476Admin Admin
    Working in a digital forensics lab is a great technical experience along the lines of the CCE certification. For the CISSP, digital forensics would be in the legal domain. As a lab tech, you'd probably only be involved in the technical part, and that would be great experience for the SSCP cert. Be sure to find out if the work experience includes on-scene investigation, chain-of-custody, testifying as an expert witness, etc. Those are all skills necessary for a forensics person to have and relevant to the legal domain of the CISSP CBK.

    Other, commonly-claimed domains for the CISSP certification are networking and telecom and access controls. People who are sysadmins or netadmins usually hit one or both of these domains.
  • kaximkaxim Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    thank you JD. thank you so much for taking out the time. I have found out that they also work on areas like:

    - Penetration Testing
    - Ethical Hacking
    - Policy making & documentation for Private Companies
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,476Admin Admin
    It sounds like you can get a lot of great InfoSec experience there. Working five years or more at a place like that, and getting a few recognized certs under your belt, will help your career a lot.
  • kaximkaxim Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    awesome. meaning i wont have any problems getting the 5 year , 2 domain related experience there. awesome :))
    cheers :D
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