Multiple Distro Certs

the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
Hey guys I actually had a quick question. I'm hoping to get more into Linux (to help with the web skills I'm trying to learn and because I love open source) and I wonder if it was good to go for several distro specific certs? Such as RHCE and CLE (SuSE). My plan is to get LPI-1 and Ubuntu, then to an engineering related cert. But I didn't know if companies might prefer that you just have one.
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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I wouldn't bother with the Ubuntu one at all. Linux+ is probably the best entry-level. The LPI exams seems good as far as I can tell, but they're not as well known. The RHCE is the most prestigious Linux cert. The SuSe one seems decent too, but again, it's not as popular. Certification seems to be much less important in the Linux realm than it is for Microsoft or Cisco. If I ever add anything on to my Linux+, it would be the RHCE.
  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber Member Posts: 1,480 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I would agree with dynamik on the Ubuntu cert. While I personally run Ubuntu as my desktop distro of choice and use it on a handful of servers in the office, in addition to planning a deployment of Ubuntu desktops at the office - it just feels to me like a lot of professionals think of it more as a hobbyist distro for your average joe to get their feet wet with Linux. As a result, I don't think their certifications are going to be taken very seriously at this time.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,227 Mod
    what do you mean by engineering related cert ?

    I agree with what's been said. Experience is the key. If you want to get into linux, then find a job where linux/unix work is involved.

    pick any cert, preferrably Linux+ or LPI..RHCE might be a bit tough if you don't have experience, but it's doable. You can also look into Solaris certs. Depends on the job you get...try to get training, it'll help you.
  • UnixGeekUnixGeek Member Posts: 151
    RHCE is going to have more value in the Linux realm than all the others combined (short of RedHat's higher level certs), but is probably not the best place for someone new to Linux to start.

    My recommendation is to start off with studying for the LPIC-1 exams. I'm going through the material right now, and can say that it really does lay a good baseline of what every Linux sysadmin should know. I've been doing this kind of work for a while, but I've still learned a few new switches. The material covers both RedHat, and Debian based distros, which I think is important. Get comfortable on the command line with one distro from each family, and you should be good for most situations.

    The following are my observations in dealing with mostly East Cost, US based organization that are running Linux or Unix.

    RedHat and CentOS are used heavily in all market segments.

    Ubuntu's getting big with the SMBs, but I don't believe that I've ever seen it in the Enterprise.

    Debian shows up frequently in all segments, but where it seems to be the most prevalent is academia. I see it more in SMBs than the Enterprise.

    Suse seems to be growing in the Enterprise. It's no where near as big as RHEL, but it's growing.

    Solaris is still strongly represented in organizations that use Oracle, or have been around long enough to have some older Unix boxes in use. The number of installations continues to gradually decrease.

    The BSDs are in a similar situation to Solaris, but more commonly found in .coms that have been around for a while, or networking appliances.

    Other Unix type OSes are used rarely enough that I wouldn't worry about them unless you know that a potential employer or customer is running it.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    Hey guys I actually had a quick question. I'm hoping to get more into Linux (to help with the web skills I'm trying to learn and because I love open source) and I wonder if it was good to go for several distro specific certs? Such as RHCE and CLE (SuSE). My plan is to get LPI-1 and Ubuntu, then to an engineering related cert. But I didn't know if companies might prefer that you just have one.

    It was best told to me by a linux engineer (and SME)

    If you want to work in the enterprise: Red Hat, Novell and Solaris (less so Novell, at least where I am)
    RED HAT: RHCT, RHCE, RHCSS, RHCVA, RHCA
    Solaris: SCSAS, SCSA, SCNA, SCSECA
    Novell: CLP, CLE

    If you want to build up you general knowledge and learn cross platform support: LPIC
    LPIC-1, LPIC-2, LPIC-3

    If you are in a support role and want to prove linux knowledge: Comptia
    Linux+

    As for my personal opinion, After cisco and S+, I plan to for LPIC-1, SCSAS/SCSA/SCNA, RHCT/RHCE and then work on SCSECA/RHCSS/GCUX along with CCNP/CCIP/CCSP. This is 3-4 year goal.

    I have done numerous searches on dice/monster and a lot of jobs (even unix jobs) want mcsa/e/itp certs as well (which is why I plan to pick up my mcsa, and possibly mcsa:s by june or so). Another thing is that besides the RHCE/SCSA, many of the certs are still somewhat obscure. I found 1 job in the nation that mentioned LPIC. 1. I think if you are trying to impress someone (like HR) quickly, go for the SCSAS/SCSA/RHCT first. The linux+ is pretty well known but alot of jobs don't care for comptia certs (my job being one of them).

    Links:

    The LPIC Program / Certification / Home - LPI -

    CompTIA Linux+

    http://www.novell.com/training/certinfo/

    redhat.com | Certification

    System Administration Training (SCSA) | Sun Solaris Certification
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