Going back into I.T. need advice

I've been out of the field for about 7 years, doing management (non I.T.) and ruuning an online biz out of my house since then. While I have no certs, I do have corporate exp in a NOC doing level 2 support, and a few years fixing PCs and laptops for friends and family. I want to get back into the field, but without a degree or certs, I'm getting hardly any calls. Working as a bench tech with laptops and PCs appeals to me as I'd rather do something less stressfull with more normal hours, but Cisco generally pays better, and given my exp, I would prob get a better salary with my CCNA, with the hope of doing voice. What I asking for opinions on, would it be easier to get a job with my A+ or CCNA immediately?

Also, how difficult is it to self study for the CCNA. I have several routers and switches in my basement. I've heard good things regarding the Cisco Academy, but I don't want to wait two semesters to finish it.

Comments

  • qwertyiopqwertyiop Member Posts: 725 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I've been out of the field for about 7 years, doing management (non I.T.) and ruuning an online biz out of my house since then. While I have no certs, I do have corporate exp in a NOC doing level 2 support, and a few years fixing PCs and laptops for friends and family. I want to get back into the field, but without a degree or certs, I'm getting hardly any calls. Working as a bench tech with laptops and PCs appeals to me as I'd rather do something less stressfull with more normal hours, but Cisco generally pays better, and given my exp, I would prob get a better salary with my CCNA, with the hope of doing voice. What I asking for opinions on, would it be easier to get a job with my A+ or CCNA immediately?

    I'm no expert but a CCNA with no experience in the Cisco world isn't going to do you much. Even if you have some PC repair experience I would still get your A+ because many recruiters and HR people wont even look at your resume if you dont have that A+ cert. Many support and tech jobs require it.
  • howiehandleshowiehandles Member Posts: 148
    I do have experience in Cisco, 2 yrs remote troubleshooting connectivity issues, and I've configured 2500s and CSU/DSUs, for a bunch of offices. I just don't have what I would consider strong troubleshooting skills. What I really want is to get my foot back in the door, while I too believe the A+ would probably get my a job the quickest, I was wondering if there's anything else I should consider. I took a Net+ class, but didn't take the test yet. It seemed like the type of cert that wouldn't open a door, but I guess anything is better than nothing.

    Thanks for your advice, I do appreciate it
  • howiehandleshowiehandles Member Posts: 148
    Would it be best to go the Linux route, or the Windows route? I know that Linux is more the server route, and Windows desktop. In the perfect world I'd learn both, but just trying to map the ideal route.

    Thanks again.
  • qwertyiopqwertyiop Member Posts: 725 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Would it be best to go the Linux route, or the Windows route? I know that Linux is more the server route, and Windows desktop. In the perfect world I'd learn both, but just trying to map the ideal route.

    Thanks again.

    Its all up to you. I work as a network admin and I can tell you from experience that a good admin knows how to work in a mixed OS environment. I would study both and once you have a few more years under your belt, you then choose your route
  • mikej412mikej412 Member Posts: 10,086 ■■■■■■■■■■
    There is no magic certification that gets you a job. If Best Buy Geek Squad near you is hiring, the A+ might be your best bet. If you can find a small ISP that needs an evening support person, the Network + or CCNA could be your ticket to an interview. An MCP or MCDST (or the newer version, whatever the heck they're call now) might land you a temp gig setting up new Windows 7 desktops for one of the few companies that has money in the budget that they are willing to spend. And a low level low paying helpdesk job that requires a pleasing personality and people skills could be your ticket to fast track promotions (and pay) if you find a good company .....

    And a lot of people are getting hardly any calls. And a lot of them have current IT job experience, current Certifications, and even degrees.

    Self study for the CCNA isn't difficult at all if you're motivated and dedicated. A lot of people do it that way. The Academy Courses help you if you want to be the top student in the class and impress your class instructor hoping that they have some contacts that could get you a job. And the Academy courses also help if you've been out of school for a while and need some structure for your studies, can't self-motivate, or need access to a school lab for hands on practice.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Member Posts: 2,333 ■■■■■■■□□□
    I know that Linux is more the server route, and Windows desktop.

    I disagree. In the 4 places that I have worked, 95% of their servers were all windows platform. Not knocking Linux, it's definitely good to know but from what I have seen and experienced, windows servers outnumber linux servers.
  • howiehandleshowiehandles Member Posts: 148
    Really? Shows you how long I've been out. Then would it be best to followup my A+ with Microsoft studies/certs?
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Really? Shows you how long I've been out. Then would it be best to followup my A+ with Microsoft studies/certs?


    Depends on what you want to do. If you want to be a MS admin then yes.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
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