Distro for Linux+

SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
What Distro(s) should I be looking at if I was preparing for linux plus? I am familiar with linux, but no expert. I have used ubuntu and fedora in the past.

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I'd go with Fedora/CentOS and a Debian-based distro as well.
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Debian :D

    Also Ubuntu, Mint, etc.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher A cornfield in OhioMember Posts: 4,299 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I agree with Dynamik. CentOS and Ubuntu would be two good ones to start with. I posted a little bit of a study guide when I was doing stuff for the Linux+ 2009 beta. It must have helped me as I passed, even though I was certain I was going to fail.

    That guide and TestOut's course for the current Linux+ was really all I used.
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    lol, a little research did the trick. Ubuntu would be fine? It's not too "user friendly"? I've used Ubuntu and Fedora in the past, it will be nice to see them again.

    And I should probably download the objectives and work my way through them?
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    SephStorm wrote: »
    lol, a little research did the trick. Ubuntu would be fine? It's not too "user friendly"? I've used Ubuntu and Fedora in the past, it will be nice to see them again.

    And I should probably download the objectives and work my way through them?

    That is what I am doing. I have printed out the objectives and I have a linux bible, I plan to pick up a few more materials and study more aggressively as I get closer to completing the CCNA:S and Security+.

    Do you have a target completion date?
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    lol, no I never had L+ as a certification goal, at least not until i mastered windows(in a manner of speaking). At the moment I am in between jobs(in a manner of speaking) so I cant activly attain any certifications until next year, but I figure I might as well get used to linux while im waiting.
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    SephStorm wrote: »
    Ubuntu would be fine? It's not too "user friendly"? I've used Ubuntu and Fedora in the past, it will be nice to see them again.

    Why don't you try them without the GUI and see how "user friendly" they are? ;)
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    rofl

    I'll see what I can do :)

    I'm reading the Linux+ Bible, its easy to understand so far. I'll keep you guys updated.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    To be on the safe side, you might want to skip going with a Debian-like distro like Ubuntu and go straight to Debian for the exam. Learning the fundamentals is important, you can always experiment with different distros afterwards. I'm also going to agree with the statement that CentOS is another good distro to get familiar with for this exam (and others), along with Slackware.

    Check out DistroWatch to download the latest versions of the distros you need.

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  • dsfjkldfdsfjkldf Member Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'm also going to agree with the statement that CentOS is another good distro to get familiar with for this exam (and others), along with Slackware.
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  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    Three distros?! hu. thats a lot of time downloading iso's. I have already downloaded Ubuntu so I will go with that. I am will be downloading centos today when I get home. As long as I'm going by the book and doing things the right way I should be good shouldn't I? ie partitioning the drive through the ubuntu command line instead of the gui. I assume the command line syntax is the same in debian and in ubuntu.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    SephStorm wrote: »
    Three distros?! hu. thats a lot of time downloading iso's. I have already downloaded Ubuntu so I will go with that. I am will be downloading centos today when I get home. As long as I'm going by the book and doing things the right way I should be good shouldn't I? ie partitioning the drive through the ubuntu command line instead of the gui. I assume the command line syntax is the same in debian and in ubuntu.

    You'll do alright with CentOS, I believe the Linux+ exam is still heavy on the Red Hat way of doing things, (most prep-books seem to be using Fedora). There will be questions that are Debian-specific, (usually dealing with the Debian package manager,) as well as things like compiling programs from source which Slackware tends to be the king of. On more advanced Linux certs, like LPI, knowledge of "the big three" is required.

    As for the syntax between Debian and Ubuntu, there will be differences. They may be minute, so make sure you read up if you're not going to install Debian. Most of this exam, for me, was remembering what command-line utilities had what switches and flags on the different distros, (like -r, -R, -t, -T). That was the most challenging thing about this exam, in my opinion.

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  • UnixGeekUnixGeek Member Posts: 151
    There's nothing wrong with using Ubuntu to learn the Debian side of things. Just remember to focus on the CLI, and not depend on any of the GUI tools.

    Throw CentOS into the mix, and your Linux exposure will be well rounded.
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    I know this isn't a tech support fourm but,

    I want to start my vm, with the physical live cd and then install Ubuntu from the command line, ect. But when I try to create a new vm, it wants to do an easy install, and apparently do everything for me. Any suggestions, instructions?
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    SephStorm wrote: »
    I know this isn't a tech support fourm but,

    I want to start my vm, with the physical live cd and then install Ubuntu from the command line, ect. But when I try to create a new vm, it wants to do an easy install, and apparently do everything for me. Any suggestions, instructions?

    How to install ubuntu without GUI - Ubuntu Forums

    Look at the second post.
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    What virtualization package are you using? When you create a new VM, check the advanced settings or equivalent. There's a way to disable the easy install. Personally, that irritates me, and I would rather have full control while sacrificing a little convenience.
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    Sorry, im using VMWare.

    Guess id better explain step by step.

    I open VMWARE Player, select create new VM, Options:

    Install from Installer Disc

    Installer Disc Image

    I will install the operating system later(this vm will be created with a blank hard disk)

    If I choose option 1, then It will automaticly detect ubuntu 8.04.3 and says this OS will use easy install. If I continue, it will ask me for Username/pw, ect. I can't continue without inputting that data.

    If I choose option 2, and select the iso i used to burn the disk, same thing.

    If I use option 3, then I will select the guest OS (Linux/ubuntu), name and location, disk options, and then I can configure hardware options. When I power on the VM, I see this screen: Picture: http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y35/LordSephiroth/vmw.png
  • UnixGeekUnixGeek Member Posts: 151
    SephStorm wrote: »
    Sorry, im using VMWare.

    Guess id better explain step by step.

    I open VMWARE Player, select create new VM, Options:

    Install from Installer Disc

    Installer Disc Image

    I will install the operating system later(this vm will be created with a blank hard disk)

    If I choose option 1, then It will automaticly detect ubuntu 8.04.3 and says this OS will use easy install. If I continue, it will ask me for Username/pw, ect. I can't continue without inputting that data.

    If I choose option 2, and select the iso i used to burn the disk, same thing.

    If I use option 3, then I will select the guest OS (Linux/ubuntu), name and location, disk options, and then I can configure hardware options. When I power on the VM, I see this screen: Picture: http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y35/LordSephiroth/vmw.png

    My guess is that you'll need you set the option to go into BIOS at the next boot, then go in, and bump up the CDROM drive in the boot sequence.

    More generally speaking, my recommendation is to ditch VMware Player, and use VMware Server instead. It's still free, it still doesn't need a dedicated box, and you'll have a lot more flexibility in what you do.
  • SephStormSephStorm Member Posts: 1,732
    I do have workstation on another computer I can use if necessary. In any case i figured it out. after modifying the boot order didn't work, I looked at the settings, long story short, the os would not auto detect my disc drive, I had to tell it in the vmware settings that d was the disc drive.
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