Frustrated, but determined

friend07friend07 Member Posts: 15 ■□□□□□□□□□
I really want to become certified to be a computer Tech, but there is so much information I get overwhelmed. I KNOW I need all the teaching and information I can get my hands on because hands-on training and knowledge will not only increase job potential, but give me a better understanding of what computers are all about...which will make my carrer easier and more rewarding. Is there a Study Course that I can follow (That will not take a lifetime) that will prepare me for CompTIA A+ Certification? Thank you!

Comments

  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Pick up a book, first and foremost. Get yourself some hardware to play with, (even if it's older stuff,) and start there. As for additional studying, check out CBT Nuggets and/or TestOut.

    I can recommend the Sybex and McGraw-Hill books, I've found those series to be very good in the past. I can also recommend both CBT Nuggets and TestOut as supplementary study-material, I've used both products in the past for various exams. Don't forget the hands-on work, though, that's as important, if not more, than all the reading and videos combined.

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  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Member Posts: 4,024
    The best way to get good with the hardware side of computers is to just do it. Most of it is incredibly simple these days, and the amount of information seems overwhelming, but you pick it up pretty easy as you go.

    Get yourself a good book on the A+ and some hardware that you can afford to break and thank god that you don't have to deal with crap like IRQ's and base I/O addresses anymore
  • mikedisd2mikedisd2 Member Posts: 1,096 ■■■■■□□□□□
    thank god that you don't have to deal with crap like IRQ's and base I/O addresses anymore

    Not the good old days you say? :-p
  • skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    The best way to get good with the hardware side of computers is to just do it. Most of it is incredibly simple these days, and the amount of information seems overwhelming, but you pick it up pretty easy as you go.
    +1. I took my A+ a while back (2003 objectives right before they were retired), and I can't emphasize enough how much I benefited by just DOING stuff. I gathered up a small army of old PC's from goodwill stores & craigslist/freecycle posts I put up, and my home office was just littered with bits & pieces for quite some time. It was messy, but it was my playground and my classroom. I never thought I was a "hardware person" but after doing some tinkering, the concepts finally started to stick. And having a bunch of old PCs in various states of disrepair did wonders for my troubleshooting skills.

    Play play play, and then play some more. Be patient, and with some time it'll stick.
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  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    As others have mentioned..

    Throw somethings together at home. Technology is very accessible these days. You will learn a lot by doing and screwing up, but at home that's fine.

    Backfill the hands on with some solid reading. Not speed reading. You want to reflect on what you are reading..think it over a little bit. Then poke about on your gear at home to get the systems there to echo what the books are telling you, or not as the case many be :)

    The reading part is important as it will help you get insights lacking in many of today's point and click techs. Classical training will help you be useful to your project manager. Point and click he has himself or his kids :)

    Keep any eye on what is happening out there, what is hot.

    Go for the long term. IT workers are the steel workers of the 21st century so look to position yourself well in 5 years time. Understand why all this stuff is needed and why companies spend money on it. So don't go uber geek at the expense of reasons why.

    Finally, real world experience. This is where you will find the worlds of knowhow and requirements clash together. It's what pays the bills and only there will you discover what you *really* need to know to get those dollars rolling in!

    Good luck!
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