Best Linux Cert if I only want one

mcgarglemcgargle Member Posts: 21 ■□□□□□□□□□
I am in a position where I need to get back up to speed on Linux (Used XENIX years ago when dirt was new) and I figure the best way is to study for a cert. I need to be able to work in Linux but my main focus will not be day to day admin responsibilities I was wondering which single cert gives me the broadest coverage.

I tend to lean toward Linux+ since the CompTia certs don't expire but that is not that big of a driver in the decision, just kind of a nice bit of “frosting” on the cake.

Since you folks are a lot more up on what the different certs require I would be very interested in your opinions.

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    The RHCE, and some CompTIA certs now have a three-year renewal. It's probably only a matter of time before they do that with Linux+.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    dynamik wrote: »
    The RHCE, and some CompTIA certs now have a three-year renewal. It's probably only a matter of time before they do that with Linux+.

    Linux+ or LPIC would be good (if you want some non vendor specific).

    RHCT or CLP if you want something vendor specific.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,150 Mod
    If you don't have enough experience to shoot for RHCE, then I say LPIC
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    RHCE is going to be the most well-recognized Linux-related cert out there at this point, and probably the one that you can get the most value out of, (higher pay and more job options). However, it's also notoriously difficult, generally ranking behind the CCIE in fail-rates.

    The LPIC series is excellent for learning and highly valued within the Linux community, but not so much outside in the general IT industry. It's not as difficult of a path, but you learn about more types of Linux systems in the process of going for LPIC-3.

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  • dmarshdmarsh Member Posts: 26 ■□□□□□□□□□
    LPIC-1 and possibly 2 seem to fit the bill best, but you must re-cert after 5 years.

    Redhat certs are the most prestigous Linux certs but very in depth for people with 3+ years hands on Linux administration.

    Open source certs on the whole are not as big a deal to people in that community as for the commercial vendors.

    Linux+ has the one benefit that 'its for life', but who knows how long that will last...

    So really for a casual Linux user, currently I'd probably say, none of the above !
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    I will say, though, that studying for the Linux+ cert was a great way for me to get up to speed on Linux. Despite CompTIA's changes, if you're really interested in starting from scratch, that might be a good way to go. You can always move on to other things later on.

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  • disidisi Member Posts: 59 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote: »
    RHCE is going to be the most well-recognized Linux-related cert out there at this point, and probably the one that you can get the most value out of, (higher pay and more job options). However, it's also notoriously difficult, generally ranking behind the CCIE in fail-rates.

    The LPIC series is excellent for learning and highly valued within the Linux community, but not so much outside in the general IT industry. It's not as difficult of a path, but you learn about more types of Linux systems in the process of going for LPIC-3.

    I totally agree with you :)

    Rather than looking for the HR value I would look for the prices as well. As far as I could see RHCE is about $2,998 to $3,520.

    LPI cert is about 100£ each test, if you don't to it on an exhibition (mostly 50% off). So you end up with LPIC-2 at 400£ if you pass each test on the first attempt. For quality, I've heard that you can compare LPIC-2 with RHCE, but I cannot tell because I didn't try RHCE :/
    A former colleague of mine tried and failed, well she got it paid by the company anyway :) At least the smaller RHCT is easy enough to get, if you fail the RHCE. (so she said)
  • mcgarglemcgargle Member Posts: 21 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks everyone for your insights. I thnk I have settled on the Linux+. Like I said I am not going to be doing Linux admin, it is more that I need to know enough to be what you might call a power user versus an admin.

    Thanks!
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    mcgargle wrote: »
    Thanks everyone for your insights. I thnk I have settled on the Linux+. Like I said I am not going to be doing Linux admin, it is more that I need to know enough to be what you might call a power user versus an admin.

    Thanks!

    Good luck with your studies! :D

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  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Member Posts: 658
    Linux+ if you just want to say you understand Linux.

    RHCT if you want to say you can work with Linux, understand how it works, configure workstations and work from command line.

    RHCE if you want to say you KNOW how to work with Linux, understand how it works, configure workstations/serves, and work towards being a command line ninja.

    In addition if you can achieve RHCE employers in the IT department know you can figure out how to work with other flavors of Linux and Unix.

    As a correction to point Comptia will grandfather Linux+ holders if they do go to an expiration time table.

    RHCT and RHCE require re-certification every two versions of Red Hat not every 3 years.

    Food for thought all upper level Red Hat certifications are automatically re-certified when you re-certify your RHCE. If you go non-current in your RHCE when you do re-certify the RHCE all other certs become current.
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