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how deep do I hv to know ipv6 for 70-642??

poguypoguy Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
how deep do I hv to know ipv6 for 70-642??
what's the most difficult question about ipv6 on exam like?

thanks

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    poguypoguy Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    like do I have to do subnet calculation like ipv4 for ipv6??
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    ChrisPEditorChrisPEditor Member Posts: 24 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I've seen a lot of guys on here talking about how heavy 70-642 covers IPv6. I actually talked to someone who failed that said he got a lot of questions on IPv6, including a few on subnetting (like, "what mask would be required /8 or /26 for x amount of subnets") and a bunch on troubleshooting DHCP with IPv6.

    So, sounds like a lot.
    Christopher Parker
    Managing Editor, PrepLogic
    Get smarter training today with PrepLogic!

    "You know what they say, 'Knowledge isn't power'... oh, wait..." --Dr. Gregory House
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    ClaymooreClaymoore Member Posts: 1,637
    In my experience, you don't need to know IPv6 in depth to pass the exam. I went off on an IPv6 tangent when I was studying for my EA, but my goal was to learn the technology first and to pass the exam second.

    If you go by the Skills Measured section on the 642, Configuring IP Addressing and Services is 24% of the exam. On a 50 question exam, that's 12-13 questions spread among IPv4, IPv6, DHCP, Routing, and IPSEC. Realistically, you may only see 2-3 scored IPv6 questions - keep in mind you will have several unscored questions where anything goes.

    Be sure to know the key IPv6 prefixes such as fe80 and fc00. Here is a handy table from network folks at RIPE that may help:
    http://www.ripe.net/info/internet-management/ipv6table.pdf

    Equally important is the IPv4 to IPv6 transition technologies such as Teredo, ISATAP and 6to4. This article from Technet will help:
    IPv6 Transition Technologies

    There is some IPv6 info in my 642 sticky, including the IPv6 technology page over at Microsoft. Maybe some of the articles from the Cable Guy and webcasts there will explain things a little better.
    Microsoft Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)
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    MentholMooseMentholMoose Member Posts: 1,525 ■■■■■■■■□□
    All you need to know should be in any of the exam study guides. If you already know how to subnet IPv4, then learning IPv6 shouldn't be much trouble. Do some practice questions to get used to the long addresses and remember than there are so many addresses available that you don't need to conserve them (so using a /64 for a point to point link is OK, you don't use VLSM at all, etc.). Also you should memorize the various types of addresses and their associated address ranges for the exam... use the chart linked by Claymoore.
    MentholMoose
    MCSA 2003, LFCS, LFCE (expired), VCP6-DCV
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    alokin123alokin123 Member Posts: 268
    when i sat this exam i got a few ipv6 questions. I went in to the exam not really expecting to be tested in depth on it. In all honesty i wasn't, but knowing the prefixes wont be enough (or it might be depending on what you are asked). You will need to recongnize what mask is required for certain addresses etc...
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    RootstonianRootstonian Member Posts: 64 ■■□□□□□□□□
    If I can thread-steal here a little and get a lesson that may help others...

    Is there a "half-double" rule for IPv6?
    That is, an IPv4 address of /24 has 256 addresses (254 hosts). /25 is 128 addresses, and /23 is 512 addresses.
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    ClaymooreClaymoore Member Posts: 1,637
    Subnetting in IPv6 is different. I'll explain it to the best of my memory, but if I am wrong I am sure someone will let me know.:D

    IPv6 is a 128 bit address space as opposed to 32 bit. The 128 bit address is split into 3 sections - a 48-bit fixed prefix, a 16-bit subnet field, and a 64 bit node address (usually built off the 48-bit MAC address so you might want to look up that formula). The 16-bit subnet field is designed for an organized routing hierarchy - not address allocation - since the host address space is always fixed at 64 bits. The 16-bit subnet prefix defines how many subnets you have instead of how many hosts in each, if that makes sense.

    Your subnet masks will use CIDR notation, and they will be look something like fdf8:f53b:82e4::53/54 or fdf8:f53b:82e4::53/62.

    Windows adds some additional quirks like appending an interface ID to the address so you can actually route a link-local address. These are supposed to be non-routable like the 169.254/16 IPv4 addresses since they can only be guaranteed to be unique on the local segment. Windows tracks the interfaces on which the packets were received so it can actually route them.

    It's also expected that each interface will have multiple IPv6 addresses for different purposes so that's something else we have to get used to.
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    poguypoguy Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    If I can thread-steal here a little and get a lesson that may help others...

    Is there a "half-double" rule for IPv6?
    That is, an IPv4 address of /24 has 256 addresses (254 hosts). /25 is 128 addresses, and /23 is 512 addresses.

    do they have question similar to this on the exam??icon_cheers.gif
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    RootstonianRootstonian Member Posts: 64 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I remember College English writing classes; I always did very good with writing. Setting up my thesis statement, corroborating paragraphs to follow, summarizing.

    It was all about "setting the stage" for the reader and giving them something to think about or remember when they finished my paper :)

    However, according to the testing Non Disclosure Agreement (which IS NOT fun to read), one is not at liberty to say that such a question exists on said exam.
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    PiersPiers Member Posts: 454 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I recall having one IPv6 question on my 642 exam, and luckily it fell into what I memorized the most and that was a) the headers (fe80: fdsomethingorother etc) and b) the transport (6to4, teredo etc).. anything deeper, and I may have been sunk icon_silent.gif
    :study: Office 365 70-347 / 698 later
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