Value of a CAPM as a Sys Admin

Do you guys think there is much of a value in the CAPM certification (aka junior PMP) for those of us in sys admin roles?

I have a B.S. in business management and would like to get into IT Management once I have the experience. Would this be a worthwhile investment in my time?

From what I understand this is one of the more difficult certifications to acquire.

I don't have enough experience to go after the PMP so that isn't an option yet.
Current Certifications:

* B.S. in Business Management
* Sec+ 2008
* MCSA

Currently Studying for:
* 70-293 Maintaining a Server 2003 Network

Future Plans:

* 70-294 Planning a Server 2003 AD
* 70-297 Designing a Server 2003 AD
* 70-647 Server 2008
* 70-649 MCSE to MCITP:EA

Comments

  • RouteThisWayRouteThisWay Posts: 514Member
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    Do you guys think there is much of a value in the CAPM certification (aka junior PMP) for those of us in sys admin roles?

    I have a B.S. in business management and would like to get into IT Management once I have the experience. Would this be a worthwhile investment in my time?

    From what I understand this is one of the more difficult certifications to acquire.

    I don't have enough experience to go after the PMP so that isn't an option yet.

    Seems like you answered your own question.

    You want to certify/learn things you are interested in and want to do. If you want to get into Management, there will be project management. Having certifications for project management will only help, not hurt you for management roles.

    It never hurts to have good project management skills no matter what industry/job/career you are in.
    "Vision is not enough; it must be combined with venture." ~ Vaclav Havel
  • SrSysAdminSrSysAdmin Posts: 259Member
    I guess I was really wondering because all of the PMPs at my current company are project managers for software development. I wasn't sure if it would be beneficial for IT as well.
    Current Certifications:

    * B.S. in Business Management
    * Sec+ 2008
    * MCSA

    Currently Studying for:
    * 70-293 Maintaining a Server 2003 Network

    Future Plans:

    * 70-294 Planning a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-297 Designing a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-647 Server 2008
    * 70-649 MCSE to MCITP:EA
  • shon541shon541 Posts: 136Member
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    I guess I was really wondering because all of the PMPs at my current company are project managers for software development. I wasn't sure if it would be beneficial for IT as well.

    It would not hurt you in the least. It can only help, and you will learn a lot of good skills in the process.
  • ChrisPEditorChrisPEditor Posts: 24Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    I guess I was really wondering because all of the PMPs at my current company are project managers for software development. I wasn't sure if it would be beneficial for IT as well.

    I don't actually have a PMP myself, but I can say with certainty that we use a lot of the PMP's core techniques to manage and organize our production output. Which, I guess, means that the PMP is applicable in a wide range of industries.
    Christopher Parker
    Managing Editor, PrepLogic
    Get smarter training today with PrepLogic!

    "You know what they say, 'Knowledge isn't power'... oh, wait..." --Dr. Gregory House
  • SrSysAdminSrSysAdmin Posts: 259Member
    Wow, PrepLogic keeps popping up everywhere I go!

    Thanks for the input, I will let my employer know this is something I would to add to my future goal track then.
    Current Certifications:

    * B.S. in Business Management
    * Sec+ 2008
    * MCSA

    Currently Studying for:
    * 70-293 Maintaining a Server 2003 Network

    Future Plans:

    * 70-294 Planning a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-297 Designing a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-647 Server 2008
    * 70-649 MCSE to MCITP:EA
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    Do you guys think there is much of a value in the CAPM certification (aka junior PMP) for those of us in sys admin roles?

    I have a B.S. in business management and would like to get into IT Management once I have the experience. Would this be a worthwhile investment in my time?

    PMI's PMBOK is definitely applicable across various industries and activities. As a sysadmin, you might be assigned projects, and you might choose to manage aspects of those projects in line with the PMBOK.

    Remember, the PMBOK is a set of best practices. You'd be hard pressed to find an organization that follows everything in there to the letter.

    I've not known anyone that earned the CAPM. I really think it's a small market and hasn't really caught on because what most people know is the PMP. PMI also offers a PgMp, which is for program management and could be thought of as a step above the PMP. However, demand for this is really low as well.

    I would think if anything, a certification like the CAPM would just be one more thing that might distinguish you from others at the same point in their careers.
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    From what I understand this is one of the more difficult certifications to acquire.

    Doubtful. The PMP is a woefully easy exam. People make it out to be much harder than it really is. It was 200 questions testing my ability to click a mouse button. I over-studied for it....I wish I had that time back. I doubt that the CAPM is harder; in fact, it's probably much easier.

    I've taken a mix of both technical and non-technical certifications. IMO, an exam like 70-290 or 70-291 is much more difficult than the PMP. I have both a technical and managerial background, so it's not like I'm some non-technical guy that thinks all technical exams are really hard.

    A good study book is the Rita Mulcahey one: Amazon.com: PMP Exam Prep, Sixth Edition: Rita's Course in a Book for Passing the PMP Exam (9781932735185): Rita Mulcahy, PMP: Books

    Her study questions appeared to me to be very close to the real exam. Her stuff isn't ****...she's well known and accredited to produce those materials.

    MS
  • darkerosxxdarkerosxx Posts: 1,343Banned
    I have taken project management courses in college and have studied for the CAPM, but I quit the CAPM. I'll tell you why...

    If you know nothing about project management, it's definitely worth it to study for the CAPM to learn the concepts because I can say with 99% surety that you will manage your projects better with the knowledge you will gain.

    However, if you will not be working as a project manager, specifically, I don't think the depth with which you're required to know the material will benefit you.

    Give the PMBOK a once over and be careful not to keep ideas too theoretical. In the end, the point is to put those ideas to use in real life projects, not to theorize about the best way to manage a project all day.

    I'm a system administrator. I found the material useful, especially when combined with ITIL Foundations material. I feel like I do a better job because of it, but I think the hoops you have to jump through to get the CAPM make it not worth the time to a system administrator.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAPosts: 5,735Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I really think ITIL would be more useful for you unless you are in a management role. I could be wrong of course...
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • SrSysAdminSrSysAdmin Posts: 259Member
    eMeS wrote: »
    PMI's PMBOK is definitely applicable across various industries and activities. As a sysadmin, you might be assigned projects, and you might choose to manage aspects of those projects in line with the PMBOK.

    Remember, the PMBOK is a set of best practices. You'd be hard pressed to find an organization that follows everything in there to the letter.

    I've not known anyone that earned the CAPM. I really think it's a small market and hasn't really caught on because what most people know is the PMP. PMI also offers a PgMp, which is for program management and could be thought of as a step above the PMP. However, demand for this is really low as well.

    I would think if anything, a certification like the CAPM would just be one more thing that might distinguish you from others at the same point in their careers.



    Doubtful. The PMP is a woefully easy exam. People make it out to be much harder than it really is. It was 200 questions testing my ability to click a mouse button. I over-studied for it....I wish I had that time back. I doubt that the CAPM is harder; in fact, it's probably much easier.

    I've taken a mix of both technical and non-technical certifications. IMO, an exam like 70-290 or 70-291 is much more difficult than the PMP. I have both a technical and managerial background, so it's not like I'm some non-technical guy that thinks all technical exams are really hard.

    A good study book is the Rita Mulcahey one: Amazon.com: PMP Exam Prep, Sixth Edition: Rita's Course in a Book for Passing the PMP Exam (9781932735185): Rita Mulcahy, PMP: Books

    Her study questions appeared to me to be very close to the real exam. Her stuff isn't ****...she's well known and accredited to produce those materials.

    MS


    Excellent advice. Thanks for the well thought out advice.

    I actually just finished speaking with our HR lady and she said a lot of the projects we bid on (federal contracting) require PMPs. However, she has never seen a project which requires a CAPM, so it clearly wouldn't offer as much of a value (to this company at least).


    Since you are a PMP...can you tell me how difficult it was to prove your hours? I'm only 3 years out of college so I will need another year experience before I can begin working toward the PMP but it's something to consider. If this isn't something that should be discussed on this board since it's not a technical exam I understand.
    Current Certifications:

    * B.S. in Business Management
    * Sec+ 2008
    * MCSA

    Currently Studying for:
    * 70-293 Maintaining a Server 2003 Network

    Future Plans:

    * 70-294 Planning a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-297 Designing a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-647 Server 2008
    * 70-649 MCSE to MCITP:EA
  • SrSysAdminSrSysAdmin Posts: 259Member
    I really think ITIL would be more useful for you unless you are in a management role. I could be wrong of course...


    I will look into that, thanks.
    Current Certifications:

    * B.S. in Business Management
    * Sec+ 2008
    * MCSA

    Currently Studying for:
    * 70-293 Maintaining a Server 2003 Network

    Future Plans:

    * 70-294 Planning a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-297 Designing a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-647 Server 2008
    * 70-649 MCSE to MCITP:EA
  • SrSysAdminSrSysAdmin Posts: 259Member
    darkerosxx wrote: »
    I have taken project management courses in college and have studied for the CAPM, but I quit the CAPM. I'll tell you why...

    If you know nothing about project management, it's definitely worth it to study for the CAPM to learn the concepts because I can say with 99% surety that you will manage your projects better with the knowledge you will gain.

    However, if you will not be working as a project manager, specifically, I don't think the depth with which you're required to know the material will benefit you.

    Give the PMBOK a once over and be careful not to keep ideas too theoretical. In the end, the point is to put those ideas to use in real life projects, not to theorize about the best way to manage a project all day.

    I'm a system administrator. I found the material useful, especially when combined with ITIL Foundations material. I feel like I do a better job because of it, but I think the hoops you have to jump through to get the CAPM make it not worth the time to a system administrator.


    Sounds like we are in a similar position. I will take this into consideration when I go up for review and have to lay out my future plans...thanks!
    Current Certifications:

    * B.S. in Business Management
    * Sec+ 2008
    * MCSA

    Currently Studying for:
    * 70-293 Maintaining a Server 2003 Network

    Future Plans:

    * 70-294 Planning a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-297 Designing a Server 2003 AD
    * 70-647 Server 2008
    * 70-649 MCSE to MCITP:EA
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    Excellent advice. Thanks for the well thought out advice.

    You're welcome.
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    I actually just finished speaking with our HR lady and she said a lot of the projects we bid on (federal contracting) require PMPs. However, she has never seen a project which requires a CAPM, so it clearly wouldn't offer as much of a value (to this company at least).

    Yeah, certifications are often a method of risk management (e.g., if I have PMP certified people working my projects, then chance of failure is decreased is the line of thinking). Doesn't surprise me that there is no such demand for CAPMs, and there are more than enough PMPs.
    JrSysAdmin wrote: »
    Since you are a PMP...can you tell me how difficult it was to prove your hours?

    Very easy. They have an online tool from their website where you enter your hours in the different areas. You also get a reduction in the required hours for having a college degree. As far as I know, my hours were not audited, but they do ask you for information in case the need to check.

    MS
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