What is the difference between 640-802 and 640-816/822?

abefromanabefroman Posts: 278Banned
What is the difference between 640-802 and 640-816/822?

TIA
Next certs:
CCNA 99.9999999999999999999999999999999% Ready

There are /31 types of people in this world, those who understand subnetting, and those who don't

Comments

  • notgoing2failnotgoing2fail Posts: 1,138Member
    Any chance this is the 1st question on the CCNA exam? LOL!!!!


    The difference is that you can break up the CCNA exam. Either take it in one shot, or take them in 2 exams. ICND1 and ICND2.
  • abefromanabefroman Posts: 278Banned
    Any chance this is the 1st question on the CCNA exam? LOL!!!!


    The difference is that you can break up the CCNA exam. Either take it in one shot, or take them in 2 exams. ICND1 and ICND2.

    So ICND1 + ICND2 is equivalent to the CCNA?

    Any advantages/disadvantages to choosing 1 exam or 2?
    Next certs:
    CCNA 99.9999999999999999999999999999999% Ready

    There are /31 types of people in this world, those who understand subnetting, and those who don't
  • notgoing2failnotgoing2fail Posts: 1,138Member
    abefroman wrote: »
    So ICND1 + ICND2 is equivalent to the CCNA?

    Any advantages/disadvantages to choosing 1 exam or 2?


    Exactly.


    I don't know if there are any advantages or disadvantages. People have different ways to go about taking the test. It just basically breaks up topics in the CCNA.

    So for example, hypothetically if you get 10 subnetting questions on the CCNA, you might actually get 20 on the ICND1 and 15 on the ICND2 because they have more time to ask you those questions.

    But at the same time, you can focus on just a couple of topics and really hone in on your skillsets...whereas the CCNA covers a lot of topics...

    Which goes back to a thread I made recently on how hard it is to remember all the minor details of the CCNA exam. You learn one thing, and you forget the other...
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    The cost is now the same between the 2 exam ICND1/ICND2 option and the 1 exam CCNA option.

    You earn the Cisco CCENT Certification now when you pass the ICND1 exam.

    When you pass the ICND1 AND ICND2 exams or the CCNA exam you earn the CCNA Certification.

    It really just comes down to personal preference.

    If you're just starting out in your IT career and could use the extra certification on your resume, then the 2 exam option probably makes sense.

    If you have a 3 hour drive (each way) to a Vue test center, then you may decide the CCENT isn't worth the time and effort of an extra trip.

    If you're a grizzled old Cisco pro with lots of Cisco job experience who finally decided to get some certifications to help get your resume pulled from a pile in case you decide to switch jobs, then the single exam option might be quicker.

    You'll probably answer more questions with the 2 exam option -- but you'll probably have fewer "easy questions" on the 1 exam option.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • thehourmanthehourman Posts: 723Member
    Studying:
    Working on CCNA: Security. Start date: 12.28.10
    Microsoft 70-640 - on hold (This is not taking me anywhere. I started this in October, and it is December now, I am still on page 221. WTH!)
    Reading:
    Network Warrior - Currently at Part II
    Reading IPv6 Essentials 2nd Edition - on hold
  • abefromanabefroman Posts: 278Banned
    mikej412 wrote: »
    You'll probably answer more questions with the 2 exam option -- but you'll probably have fewer "easy questions" on the 1 exam option.

    For some reason I tend to get the hard questions right and miss the easy ones lol.

    Is the Cisco CCENT Certification good for just 3 years or good for life?
    Next certs:
    CCNA 99.9999999999999999999999999999999% Ready

    There are /31 types of people in this world, those who understand subnetting, and those who don't
  • notgoing2failnotgoing2fail Posts: 1,138Member
    abefroman wrote: »
    For some reason I tend to get the hard questions right and miss the easy ones lol.

    Is the Cisco CCENT Certification good for just 3 years or good for life?

    If I had to guess, probably 3 years. What is ever good for life? LOL...

    I can't see why they would make the CCENT any different than other certifications that expire in 3 years....


    I'm always over analyzing a question. I do use process of elimination to help me out. But sometimes I am completely stuck on 2 choices that I can argue are the correct answer....

    Short of the very easy ones, the ones that expect a little interpretation get me.....
  • abefromanabefroman Posts: 278Banned
    If I had to guess, probably 3 years. What is ever good for life? LOL...

    Network+ icon_wink.gif
    Next certs:
    CCNA 99.9999999999999999999999999999999% Ready

    There are /31 types of people in this world, those who understand subnetting, and those who don't
  • hexemhexem Posts: 177Member
    Until next year, then compTIA make all there exams require renewal. :)

    ccna > network+
    ICND1 - Passed 25/01/10
    ICND2 - Passed 9/03/10

    Studying CCNA:S
  • thehourmanthehourman Posts: 723Member
    It is a good thing that I got all 3 basics from CompTIA already, so no renewal for me.
    Studying:
    Working on CCNA: Security. Start date: 12.28.10
    Microsoft 70-640 - on hold (This is not taking me anywhere. I started this in October, and it is December now, I am still on page 221. WTH!)
    Reading:
    Network Warrior - Currently at Part II
    Reading IPv6 Essentials 2nd Edition - on hold
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    abefroman wrote: »
    Is the Cisco CCENT Certification good for just 3 years or good for life?
    3 years -- but it probably gets a new 3 years when you pass the ICND2 (or CCNA) exam.

    Usually the more advanced exams will re-certify you lower level Certifications. As long as you keep your Cisco knowledge up to date and take professional level (or higher) exam every 3 years you keep all your Certification.

    The Cisco Specialist Certification are only good for 2 years and are more annoying to keep re-certified.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • notgoing2failnotgoing2fail Posts: 1,138Member
    mikej412 wrote: »
    3 years -- but it probably gets a new 3 years when you pass the ICND2 (or CCNA) exam.

    Usually the more advanced exams will re-certify you lower level Certifications. As long as you keep your Cisco knowledge up to date and take professional level (or higher) exam every 3 years you keep all your Certification.

    The Cisco Specialist Certification are only good for 2 years and are more annoying to keep re-certified.

    I've always wondered about this. Say you get your CCNA now and the cert shows that it expires in 2013.

    If you pass CCNP's Switching exam next year. Do you get another CCNA certificate automatically moving the date to 2014? Is there some kind of process or follow you have to do/

    The specialist, I'm assuming you're talking about the wireless, voice and security?

    Do you think a CCNA holding a wireless, security and voice certification has more merit than someone with a CCNP?
  • fieldmonkeyfieldmonkey Posts: 254Users Awaiting Email Confirmation ■■■□□□□□□□
    abefroman wrote: »
    What is the difference between 640-802 and 640-816/822?

    TIA

    It's kinda like going to subway...

    So it depends on how hungry you are whereas, your hunger is the equivalent of your cisco routing and switching background and knowledge.

    If you are really really hungry, you just order the foot long sub with all the fixings and you can proudly say you have eaten a footlong sub!

    If you are not so hungry, then you just order a regular 6 inch sub, then return later or the next day to have second one, but only after you have eaten the second 6 inch sub can you proudly say... I have eaten a foot long sub! icon_jokercolor.gif
    WIP:
    Husband & Fatherhood Caitlin Grace born 8-26-2010

    Future Certs:
    Q1-2011 - INCD2, Microsoft or Linux (decisions, decisions...)
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    I've always wondered about this. Say you get your CCNA now and the cert shows that it expires in 2013.

    If you pass CCNP's Switching exam next year. Do you get another CCNA certificate automatically moving the date to 2014? Is there some kind of process or follow you have to do
    When Cisco changed their 3rd party Certification Management System supplier/provider I did get 5 identical updated CCIP Certificates at one time, and a couple other Certificates -- but usually only the "first one" is free. Since that "changeover glich" I've re-certified everything but didn't get any free updated certificates, which is fine.

    If you want updated certificates to reflect your updated certification expiration date, you probably have to buy them.

    I just rely on the Cisco Certification Verification System and don't bother with the actual certificates or certification numbers (which may still be possible to validate separately).
    The specialist, I'm assuming you're talking about the wireless, voice and security?
    No, those are CCNA Specializations -- and still associate level and valid for 3 years. :D

    Go to the Cisco Certification Introduction web page or the Cisco Exams Organized by Certification web page and page down or search to/for the Specialist Certifications section. Those are the "valid for 2 year Cisco Specialist Certifications"

    There are Specialist Certifications, like the Data Center or MeetingPlace Certifications, that aren't part of any of the Associate, Professional, or Expert Cisco Certifications. Others, like some of the security ones, just start showing up as you pass exams while working for the CCSP.
    Do you think a CCNA holding a wireless, security and voice certification has more merit than someone with a CCNP?
    There was a whole thread on this recently -- but I'll leave it as homework for someone to find and post the link.

    The CCNA Specializations may give a noob more opportunities -- just like combining some lower level Microsoft and Linux Certification along with a CCNA.

    A noob with a CCNA and CCNP and no actual IT work experience is a noob without a clue (or a soon to be University Graduate who hopefully at least did internships while in school and studied hard to earn the CCNA/CCNP and is getting interviewed via their University's Recruitment program).
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • aldousaldous Posts: 105Member
    my 2 cents
    do the two exam route it will provide you with a solid grounding for your np studies.
Sign In or Register to comment.