question on memorizing for 701 compared to 601

tonyg1tonyg1 Member Posts: 32 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hello to everyone, I have a few questions i would like to ask for some feedback. I am a little confused on one thing for sure, what is to be memorized for the a+ exam now that it has changed to 701-702.
Do we need to know irq's, post error codes, cpus/sockets if so which ones there is to many lol, power supplies, expansion slots/cards, screen resolutions, ports, memory specifics?
When i read over the 701 objectives it does state such things mentioned above but does not say how in depth you need to know them. I do not have a problem memorizing but i would just like to know what is still needed to be memorized and what stuff is no longer needed.
As for cpus and sockets, I know there is a ton of them and alot of them are out dated. Is there a certain cpu and socket that one would say to start memorizing there to and go to current cpu's/sockets?
I memorized the irq's, port addresses, started cpu's sockets (starting at socket a to am3 sockets, have not started on intel yet. I just started to read on power supplies and see there is a bit to cover on it so i may be on this chapter for a week now. Anyone know what about power supplies is a must and what is not needed?
Right now i am reading mike meyers 2009 a+ and sybex 2009 a+ books. I am also using online videos from professor messer but what i do not like is i will read a chapter and then view the video on that chapter and notice that the book has alot in it but the video doesnt touch on everything. Would it be safe to say read the book and use the videos as overview when done or future review? thanks

Comments

  • PlantwizPlantwiz Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    If it is on the objectives, it is fair game to be asked in any capacity on your exam.

    Due to the NDA we cannot discuss 'what' is on the exam or what may be on your exam.

    The A+ is geared toward a candidate "WITH" at least 6 months experience (500 hours IIRC) and it may be beneficial to pickup a text or two that cover the material.

    Mike Meyer's "All-in-one" is a fantastic book and he's a pioneer of the A+ text. Several editions published and he's been at it since the first exam.

    Sybex is another great text.

    Both of these will provide the most depth of knowledge. There are Passport series, ExamCram series, these are geared toward folks merely needing a quick review.

    Good luck.


    Remember - it is a vendor neutral exam...thousands have taken and passed this exam, it it were most folks begin their exam careers...but it is not necessary depending on what one's interests in IT are.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • tonyg1tonyg1 Member Posts: 32 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I know about the confidentially for the a+exam, i was not asking for answers. I was wondering since things like socket a are so old would it be needed to know since we advanced so much already? There has been am2, am2+, am3 and each of those classes in itself has more then a few cpus with different names. I do not see how just a socket A- Athlon is still needed, I could see it being on the older exams 601 and prior but now were mostly going 64 bit, multi processors. I do not know much about intel cpu's that will be fun learning them.
    I just feel that when I read mike meyers 2009 a+ there were a few cpus in there and i thought that was all that was needed. Then i watched a professor messer video on cpus/sockets and there were some different cpus that the book did not mention.
    I kinda feel like even though i am using more then one source of info there is either to many to memorize or that some kind of a guide needs to be put up by comptia that is a little bit better then there OBJECTIVES that goes into a little detail then just saying CPU'S in the objectives. Maybe something saying get familiar with cpus starting from socket 940 to am3. Instead of thinking you need to go from socket a to am3.
    Same thing about irq's, i read the chapter and at the end it sorta states that irq's are handled mainly by windows now but still good to knoow them. Then when i view the forums/threads/posts i see people saying never had one irq question on the exam.
    What about screen resolutions, still needed?
    Same thing about beep codes too are those even necessary now?
    I can see things related to networking being memorized more then cable lengths.
    How about Tape Drives, I was thinking usb memory sticks would be taking that over in most cases, i know i dumped my tape drive years ago. especially with cd/dvd burners.
    I am not trying to knock anything, I am just saying that with over two different exam versions and hearing that the 701-702 are so identical to the 601-602 just more vista added and less win 2000 isnt enough. If there gearing more to current technology they need to let go of some of the old stuff alittle more then just saying in the objectives there will be CPU'S.
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    tonyg1 wrote: »
    I know about the confidentially for the a+exam, i was not asking for answers.

    Cool! Then you understand the above comment and know that by continuing to ask about specifics you risk having us all violate the NDA and I am fairly confidenant you wouldn't want to do that.


    I was wondering since things like socket a are so old would it be needed to know since we advanced so much already? There has been am2, am2+, am3 and each of those classes in itself has more then a few cpus with different names. I do not see how just a socket A- Athlon is still needed, I could see it being on the older exams 601 and prior but now were mostly going 64 bit, multi processors. I do not know much about intel cpu's that will be fun learning them.

    If it is listed on the current objectives...it may be on your exam.

    I just feel that when I read mike meyers 2009 a+ there were a few cpus in there and i thought that was all that was needed. Then i watched a professor messer video on cpus/sockets and there were some different cpus that the book did not mention.

    Different authors prefer to highlight different areas. Meyer's is the pioneer of A+ material (IMO). He recommends following the objectives too (IIRC)
    I kinda feel like even though i am using more then one source of info there is either to many to memorize or that some kind of a guide needs to be put up by comptia that is a little bit better then there OBJECTIVES that goes into a little detail then just saying CPU'S in the objectives. Maybe something saying get familiar with cpus starting from socket 940 to am3. Instead of thinking you need to go from socket a to am3.
    Same thing about irq's, i read the chapter and at the end it sorta states that irq's are handled mainly by windows now but still good to knoow them. Then when i view the forums/threads/posts i see people saying never had one irq question on the exam.
    What about screen resolutions, still needed?
    Same thing about beep codes too are those even necessary now?
    I can see things related to networking being memorized more then cable lengths.
    How about Tape Drives, I was thinking usb memory sticks would be taking that over in most cases, i know i dumped my tape drive years ago. especially with cd/dvd burners.

    If it is listed, you should know it.
    Experience using the components helps greatly, but others will state they were fine merely reading a book. Up to you, but I'll side with experience and using texts to solidify the info that wasn't learned in the field, vendor training and whitepapers.

    I am not trying to knock anything, I am just saying that with over two different exam versions and hearing that the 701-702 are so identical to the 601-602 just more vista added and less win 2000 isnt enough. If there gearing more to current technology they need to let go of some of the old stuff alittle more then just saying in the objectives there will be CPU'S.

    Well, from my own experience, I have a client who still uses vampire taps, (to avoid crimping network segments) and another still using terminals, so who are you to say a technology is too 'old' to be on the exam?? A+ is saying the canditate is proficient in 'x', 'y', 'z' technologies and I could argue that if you don't know those items, you shouldn't be A+ certified, right?

    The exams tend to cover some older technologies as well as some current. It's a safe bet the Win3x material is off the exam, so concentrate on what is on the exam and try not to argue with it. It's there. Thousands of candidates have taken and passed this year and many years ahead of you...or skip the A+ and work a certification path more in line with your IT background.

    The A+ certification isn't for everyone.
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    You probably shouldn't have to worry about IRQ's or socket numbers. I took the old test and remember not really studying for those kind of things and still passed. Post error codes you might see. However, since the beep codes can be different from each manufacture don't bother memorizing them all. Focus on the stuff that matters and if a question does pop up on one of them and you don't know the answer, you can still pass without scoring a 900. Don't completely ignore that kind of stuff you mentioned, just don't stress over it.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I "studied" all that stuff. Even got hold of some old comp's just so I could look at them (local recycling place, they buy em for $5 each and I bought them for the same and stripped them down and made a profit by selling the individual boards/HD's/cases/PS's back to them). The common IRQ's are fair game as are some of the beep codes. The point of studying for a cert is not to pass the test but to learn the material. You shouldn't really have to memorize a lot but just by reading/seeing/touching you'll learn a few things.
    Look at the objectives and use this as your guide. If you come across material that is lightly covered in the objectives but interests you or you think might benefit you to know more about it, then study it further. Extra knowledge can do nothing but benefit you in the future. Trying to "memorize" things is not really a good way of learning. I learned the sockets by pulling the cpus from every type the old A+ book mentioned (got my A+ in December 200icon_cool.gif I'm currently building my 4th computer (most people have done more) and this is the first that is going to be mine as the others have been for 1) wife 2&3) friends but this one will be the first with real power which is why it's taking time to build (finances limited)
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    CompTIA is trying to get away from memorizing. They took a lot of flack in the past for being a test that was all about memorizing and anybody could get it without having any actual pc knowledge. They have come to terms that nobody really memorizes all of the beep and stop codes anymore because they are all super easy to google. They still may throw the common ones your way. Take a look at them, understand what they are and move on. And like I said before, don't be too troubled if you didn't answer one right. Focus on the big picture, since those are the questions that are likely to get more points. CompTIA probably doesn't do a straight percentage. Question 1 doesn't equal question 2.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • tonyg1tonyg1 Member Posts: 32 ■■□□□□□□□□
    thanks earweed and devilsbane, Devil that was what i needed to know WHERE THE HECK HAVE U BEEN FOR THE LAST MONTH lol... I knew we did not need to memorize everything... to me memorizing is knowing it inside and out and can be asked anything about it. But how i like to do things is get comfy with it, meaning i know what it is and how it works. But just memorizing for no reason is just trying to pass without having a interest in the computer in other words it would be just a job without passion....
    My father is a engineer and i have learned sooo much from him about computers at the age of 8 and i am now 32. The only thing is i know my stuff but its like knowing a language. There is the street slang and then the proper english language. Well, for computers I know the slang but i am now trying to learn the proper way to speak LOL. I have built over 200 computers since 1995, but never learned irq's, beeps, sockets/ cpus. there was no need to pretty much automaticly setup. Now if i was to troubleshoot problems i would have memorized them but i was the builder from scratch to finish .. I never dealt with the problem solving though i do now how to fix them just not in a proper way i guess.
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
    earweed wrote: »
    I "studied" all that stuff. Even got hold of some old comp's just so I could look at them (local recycling place, they buy em for $5 each and I bought them for the same and stripped them down and made a profit by selling the individual boards/HD's/cases/PS's back to them). The common IRQ's are fair game as are some of the beep codes. The point of studying for a cert is not to pass the test but to learn the material. You shouldn't really have to memorize a lot but just by reading/seeing/touching you'll learn a few things.
    Look at the objectives and use this as your guide. If you come across material that is lightly covered in the objectives but interests you or you think might benefit you to know more about it, then study it further. Extra knowledge can do nothing but benefit you in the future. Trying to "memorize" things is not really a good way of learning. I learned the sockets by pulling the cpus from every type the old A+ book mentioned (got my A+ in December 200icon_cool.gif I'm currently building my 4th computer (most people have done more) and this is the first that is going to be mine as the others have been for 1) wife 2&3) friends but this one will be the first with real power which is why it's taking time to build (finances limited)
    1+ I couldn't agree more, it's more aobut what you learn than the actually cetification.
    Hello to everyone, I have a few questions i would like to ask for some feedback. I am a little confused on one thing for sure, what is to be memorized for the a+ exam now that it has changed to 701-702.
    Do we need to know irq's, post error codes, cpus/sockets if so which ones there is to many lol, power supplies, expansion slots/cards, screen resolutions, ports, memory specifics?
    When i read over the 701 objectives it does state such things mentioned above but does not say how in depth you need to know them. I do not have a problem memorizing but i would just like to know what is still needed to be memorized and what stuff is no longer needed.
    As for cpus and sockets, I know there is a ton of them and alot of them are out dated. Is there a certain cpu and socket that one would say to start memorizing there to and go to current cpu's/sockets?
    I memorized the irq's, port addresses, started cpu's sockets (starting at socket a to am3 sockets, have not started on intel yet. I just started to read on power supplies and see there is a bit to cover on it so i may be on this chapter for a week now. Anyone know what about power supplies is a must and what is not needed?
    Right now i am reading mike meyers 2009 a+ and sybex 2009 a+ books. I am also using online videos from professor messer but what i do not like is i will read a chapter and then view the video on that chapter and notice that the book has alot in it but the video doesnt touch on everything. Would it be safe to say read the book and use the videos as overview when done or future review? thanks

    Here is what I did
    1. I read the Sybex complete book for the A+ 701, 702
    2. I read the Exam cram book InformIT: CompTIA A+ 220-701 and 220-702 Exam Cram:
    3. Lab Sim I watched , did labs, answered questions, and took notes. A+ Certification: Online Training for A+ Certification
    4. I made note cards off the tear out exam cram sheet
    5. I bought Measure Up 701 practice test scored 90% 3 times, then I took all 300 questions then I documented each question I missed… I wrote them down on a note card _ thanks veritas libertas for this tip. Then I scheduled the test
    I’m following the same methods for the 702 except I built a computer to gain experience in the hardware aspect.
    This is what I did to pass the exam

    If you want more indepth info than what's covered on the A+ I suggest the following book
    InformIT: Upgrading and Repairing PCs, 19th Edition

    Also, I suggest the following website:
    Tom's Hardware: Hardware News, Tests and Reviews
    Good Luck
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • tonyg1tonyg1 Member Posts: 32 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you for the info that you have provided. I also have been going to tomshardware.com for a long time now. I used to go there for reading reviews on cpu's, video cards, motherboards ect..
    I also got some good info on over clocking my last rig. I have fallen behind on my keeping up with current pc hardware, I need to read up to see.
    Out of curiousity is your guys take on windows 2000 towards the new version of the test? Reason i am asking i have my own original copy of win 2000, windows vista, windows xp, and windows7 thing is i have not messed with windows 2000 in at least 8 years. Just wondering if it would be worth installing on a spare pc?
    I have my main pc with win7, a second pc with win xp 64 and laptop with Vista on it. I used to game alot and would upgrade every so often and with the extra equipment i would build a pc out of the spare stuff just not to waste it but now each one of my 2 daughters has there own except they do not like me to teach them the pc, i guess it is boring to them. I remember my father using dos/win 3.1 and i would start to pass out right there lol but that was when i was under 12, still amazing how far things have come. I remember in the 90's when the cd drive speeds kept upgrading like crazy. One time i would be installing a 40x something i believe and then the next month or so it would be a 50x something. Then i thought well that is it they wont advance no more, yeah right now we have dvd burners and dual layer discs.
Sign In or Register to comment.