Go for the Associates?

SephStormSephStorm Posts: 1,732Member
I am wondering if I should go for my Associates Degree in IT. It was my original intention, as I was/am against Bahelors degrees, however, After reading many threads here and reading articles elsewhere, I decided to look at WGU's BS-IT Security (likely).

Well one of my instructors the other day was saying that It is better to have on your resume "degree completed" than it is to have "in progress" or "plans to". It makes sense. It would also get rid of some of the courses at WGU, hopefully all of my General Ed classes. I also don't know if it will help with promotion points (Army), I know a Bachelors will.

So, please tell me what you think is better and why, and please leave a link to an accredited university that offers a Assoc. degree that may be worth looking into (Preferably in security, but other IT areas would be appreciated).

Comments

  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member
    I think the degree is highly important. Others disagree, but being able to say you committed even to 2 years of higher education I think says a lot about the individual.

    It can also come in handy down the road. I have a couple older friends that have gotten as high as they can without their B.S. if you want to earn more and be more respected, it is generally a pretty good bet.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • erpadminerpadmin Posts: 4,165Member
    Devilsbane wrote: »
    I think the degree is highly important. Others disagree, but being able to say you committed even to 2 years of higher education I think says a lot about the individual.

    It can also come in handy down the road. I have a couple older friends that have gotten as high as they can without their B.S. if you want to earn more and be more respected, it is generally a pretty good bet.


    +1, plus rep for this post! :)

    I am one of those people who have gone as high as I can go. My boss hates the fact I'm only $xx amount behind him because of my union raises. I guess I was supposed to stay making peanuts. icon_rolleyes.gif I told him I would trade my raises for his six figure salary plus management perks. He pretty much stayed shut after that.

    Having said that, Seph, an Associates is good, but not great. You definitely have a degree completed and would be better than people like myself, BUT a B.S. is so much better. You should not stop at an Associates just because it's only 2 years and a B.S. is 4. You should definitely go all the way, if you can. :D
  • xenodamusxenodamus Posts: 758Member
    I finished an associates in network support and I don't regret it a bit. I do plan on finishing my bachelors as well though. Although my associates has helped me get the positions I've held so far, I feel like my bachelors will carry me even further in the future.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    I am working on 2 A.A.S's in route to the BSCS. My suggestion is for you to do it. I think having at least some type of degree on my resume within the next few months (instead of just having some credits towards a degree) will help me out. It will also save me a ton of money. Just make sure you credits transfer.

    EDIT: Congrats on the S+ btw..
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,312Admin Admin
    The AA or AS is an excellent way to start your academic career. Go to a community college, which is much cheaper per unit than a 4-year university. Pick up an Associates degree while getting all of those lower-division GE classes with transferable units out of the way. Think of it as a certification from the college. The requirements for the degree makes an excellent degree completion plan too.

    Oh, many employers that require a college degree will accept an Associates degree, so your chances for better employment are improved as well.
  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    What most above have been saying +1. Make sure your credits will transfer and go for it.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • SephStormSephStorm Posts: 1,732Member
    Thanks for the input, any advise on potential colleges for the Assoc?

    (I meant to clarify, I am still planning on going to WGU for my BS.)
  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Posts: 1,899Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I don't know any of the colleges in the area that you're in. I do suggest that for any college that you find, make sure you check out the courses for each program to see which school has more computer classes along with the ones where you think wil help you out the most.

    I was soo tempted to drive 100+ miles, pay out of county tutition (for 6 months), and live with my aunt just to attend a community college that focused more on computers. They also had more computer programs than the current CC I attend does. I didn't because I was almost done with my AA at the CC.
    Booya!!
    WIP : | CISSP [2018] | CISA [2018] | CAPM [2018] | eCPPT [2018] | CRISC [2019] | TORFL (TRKI) B1 | Learning: | Russian | Farsi |
    *****You can fail a test a bunch of times but what matters is that if you fail to give up or not*****
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member
    knwminus wrote: »
    I am working on 2 A.A.S's in route to the BSCS.

    2 A.A.'s does not equal 1 B.A. Unfortunately that isn't how it works. After spending 3 years in community college I was very close to getting another A.A.S. degree. It would have taken me another semester and I was going to get it just because I had came that close.

    I was cautioned by many not to do it, but still intended on doing it until the school, and mainly one of the teachers upset me, and I just wanted out. Tired of dealing with that crappy instructor.

    So I won't tell you not to do it, just caution you that it might not get you what you were expecting.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Devilsbane wrote: »
    2 A.A.'s does not equal 1 B.A. Unfortunately that isn't how it works. After spending 3 years in community college I was very close to getting another A.A.S. degree. It would have taken me another semester and I was going to get it just because I had came that close.

    I was cautioned by many not to do it, but still intended on doing it until the school, and mainly one of the teachers upset me, and I just wanted out. Tired of dealing with that crappy instructor.

    So I won't tell you not to do it, just caution you that it might not get you what you were expecting.


    I am not at all saying 2 A.A.S = 1 BSCS. My first degree is in network engineering (CCNA plus some core classes) so I have most of that done. My second A.A.S is in Software Development (C++, Java and core classes) so it made sense for me to enroll in the Network Engineering track once I got the CCNA done on my own since the core classes are the same.

    My thing is, at the end of 2 years I can either have a degree or I can have 2 years worth of classes. To me it is a no brainer. Get you A.A.S and then go to a 4 year school UNLESS you have a full ride somewhere or something like that.

    To the OP:

    If you can find a good A.A or A.S program go for it. A.A.S's tend to be harder to transfer (my school has several special programs for transfering students. I guess that is the benefit for being on of the largest community colleges in the Country).
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member
    Sounds like you have a plan. I think being well rounded is good. Not a huge fan of programming, but the little bit I have learned has paid off big for me with some scripting that I have done.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Devilsbane wrote: »
    Sounds like you have a plan. I think being well rounded is good. Not a huge fan of programming, but the little bit I have learned has paid off big for me with some scripting that I have done.


    Lol I am ONLY doing it because it will A: Help me learn linux and other open systems a little better and B get me out of the programming classes at the school I want to go to. I'd rather been in a class of 15 vs 50.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    If I was a kid coming out of highschool I would look to do a associate level program that mirrored up to a university and their bachelors program.

    Example would be AAS Accounting then transitioning into a state university for accounting. That's how I would approach it. Obviously not just accounting, whatever degree you wanted to learn.

    So in short I would do the associate level degree.
  • bellheadbellhead Posts: 120Member
    Like everybody else has suggested do the community college AA, find one they ties into a 4 year college. Mash out all of those non computer classes that you guys seem to hate, I really liked a lot of my liberal arts classes as I feel they made me a more rounded individual and their was more eye candy in them than in the engineering geeky classes.

    What part of Florida are you in?
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAPosts: 5,735Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    SephStorm wrote: »
    Thanks for the input, any advise on potential colleges for the Assoc?

    (I meant to clarify, I am still planning on going to WGU for my BS.)

    This might be of interest to you and others:

    http://www.wgu.edu/wgu/cc_graduates

    Ivy Tech Community College Scholarship | Online University | Western Governors University Online
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
Sign In or Register to comment.