Request salary range before interview?

-Foxer--Foxer- Member Posts: 151
I got an email to set up an interview for a systems administrator job. I have no idea what the salary range is, and I don't want to waste my time if I know the pay is too low.

So my question is, should I ask about the salary, or just go to the interview and wait and see if/what they offer?

Thanks for any advice!

Comments

  • ssampierssampier Member Posts: 224
    The eternal question of negotiating: Whomever speaks first loses.

    Generally, it is considered a good idea to wait until the offer is extended to negotiate on salary/perks/insurance.

    I have found that in my applications they usually request a salary history and ask for a salary range in the interview. I like a broad range (+/- $10,000).

    Does this mean you can start discussing salary and benefits? My guess is no.
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  • TechnitoTechnito Member Posts: 152
    More than likely they'll probably ask you your desired salaried sometime during the interview. I don't think you should inquire about the salary to them prior to the interview. Some exceptions....If it's a recruiter that's setting this up and you'll be contracting through the recruiting agency, then yes I'd ask them a pay rate on the spot. And if it's too low I would try to negotiate with them before the interview. Simply because recruiters typically want to pay you less as possible. There are a few agencies I know of that intentionally try to place you in positions you're way over qualified for just to please the client. And this is bad for the employee because they usually will be well under paid. But anyway, if this is an interview being setup directly by the employer, you should wait to discuss salary with them until face to face.

    Before discussing salary, definitely be sure to point out your qualifications, experience and education etc. You want to sell yourself as much as possible and try your best to prove why you're the best candidate ever and how you plan to benefit the company. The mistake a lot of people make when it comes to being asked about their desired salary, they say "open". Be sure to have a specific salary "range" in mind that you are definitely comfortable with (example: $45k-$50). In most cases if the employer likes you and think you're a good fit they'll work with you and make an offer within your salary range.

    Good luck with the interview :)
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  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Part of it depends on how desparate you are. If you have been without job for sometime, you want to be respectful and take what you can get. If you already have one and are looking to move up, then you don't really have anything to lose by being a little blunt about the salary.
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  • shodownshodown Member Posts: 2,271
    ssampier wrote: »
    The eternal question of negotiating: Whomever speaks first loses.

    Generally, it is considered a good idea to wait until the offer is extended to negotiate on salary/perks/insurance.

    I have found that in my applications they usually request a salary history and ask for a salary range in the interview. I like a broad range (+/- $10,000).

    Does this mean you can start discussing salary and benefits? My guess is no.


    Quite the opposite. Why waste time. Get the range before the interview to save yourself and the company time. No since of you even going in if it doesn't meet your salary requirements. You don't' have to make a choice right then and there, but its good to find out so you don't set yourself up for a let down.
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  • Mojo_666Mojo_666 Member Posts: 438
    I would ask myself, I have never seen a job advertised where they do not include the salary range. But if the culture is different where you are then follow the etiquette that goes with it.
  • BradleyHUBradleyHU Member Posts: 918 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Mojo_666 wrote: »
    I would ask myself, I have never seen a job advertised where they do not include the salary range. But if the culture is different where you are then follow the etiquette that goes with it.

    I've seen both. It depends on the company. Some show the range(or the exact amount), some dont show anything. The one i hate is when they say "salary/compensation commensurate with experience"...that drives me nuts.
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  • colemiccolemic Member Posts: 1,568 ■■■■■■■□□□
    shodown wrote: »
    Quite the opposite. Why waste time. Get the range before the interview to save yourself and the company time. No since of you even going in if it doesn't meet your salary requirements. You don't' have to make a choice right then and there, but its good to find out so you don't set yourself up for a let down.


    That's also a recipe for not even being considered for the position by looking like money is the only thing that matters to you. I think the only people that can get away with that kind of attitude are those that have a very specific, very in-demand skillset. If I was interviewing you and the first thing out of your mouth was money, you wouldn't make the first cut, regardless of your skills... managers want people working for them that like where they work, not just their paycheck, which is a strong indicator that you would bolt at the first job offering you a nickel more.

    Just my .02
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  • Mojo_666Mojo_666 Member Posts: 438
    colemic wrote: »
    That's also a recipe for not even being considered for the position by looking like money is the only thing that matters to you. I think the only people that can get away with that kind of attitude are those that have a very specific, very in-demand skillset. If I was interviewing you and the first thing out of your mouth was money, you wouldn't make the first cut, regardless of your skills... managers want people working for them that like where they work, not just their paycheck, which is a strong indicator that you would bolt at the first job offering you a nickel more.

    Just my .02

    I work to earn money, if an employer has to wrestle with that notion then I don’t think I would want to work for them. I do not think it is unreasonable to know what, where and how well paid a job is before applying.
  • colemiccolemic Member Posts: 1,568 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Not disagreeing with you - just point poiting out that if $ if the first thing you talk about, then that could possibly be a huge turnoff. For example, where I work now... it's on an US Army installation in the middle of the Pacific... When I started here I took a 17K pay cut to come here. BUT - we don't have cars - so no payments, no insurance, no gas. Housing is provided, so no rent/mortgage payments. Meals are provided as well, as is all health insurance. But just on the surface, most people wouldn't consider it because of the paycheck size. but in reality, dollar-wise, it's not really an overall bad deal. But if you walked because you saw the paycheck size only, you would never have gotten all the info that I just gave you.

    Some places also have slightly lower salary because they have wicked good benefits as well.
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  • Mojo_666Mojo_666 Member Posts: 438
    colemic wrote: »
    You would never have gotten all the info that I just gave you.


    Trust me, it wouldn't have helped. icon_thumright.gif
  • colemiccolemic Member Posts: 1,568 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Mojo_666 wrote: »
    Trust me, it wouldn't have helped. icon_thumright.gif


    LOL! icon_cool.gif
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  • xenodamusxenodamus Member Posts: 758
    I've always been currently employed during my jobs hunts, and I usually ask about the salary range up front. I don't want to take time off from my current job to go to interviews, take phone calls, etc. only to find out their pay range is crap. There are polite ways to go about it. I usually say something like:

    "Since I'm currently employed, I'd really like to make sure we're in the same ballpark salary-wise before I schedule an interview."

    Everyone I've dealt with has always been understanding of that.
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  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    BradleyHU wrote: »
    I've seen both. It depends on the company. Some show the range(or the exact amount), some dont show anything. The one i hate is when they say "salary/compensation commensurate with experience"...that drives me nuts.

    What drives me nuts is when they say nothing about salary other than to include your requested salary along with a cover letter and your resume.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    xenodamus wrote: »
    "Since I'm currently employed, I'd really like to make sure we're in the same ballpark salary-wise before I schedule an interview."

    Everyone I've dealt with has always been understanding of that.

    I think that is an excellent way to put it. You get to put it out there without looking like you are all about money.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • BradleyHUBradleyHU Member Posts: 918 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Devilsbane wrote: »
    What drives me nuts is when they say nothing about salary other than to include your requested salary along with a cover letter and your resume.

    true...that is annoying too. they're basically letting you potentially ask your way out of consideration for that position.
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  • ssampierssampier Member Posts: 224
    Yes, I would say probably 1/3 of the jobs I have applied require a salary history to be enclosed.

    In my mind salary histories are a bit unfair to the potential employee - mine shows one salary less than $20k/yr when I was still cutting my teeth in the industry. My salary range now is more than double that.
    colemic wrote: »
    Not disagreeing with you - just point poiting out that if $ if the first thing you talk about, then that could possibly be a huge turnoff. For example, where I work now... it's on an US Army installation in the middle of the Pacific... When I started here I took a 17K pay cut to come here....

    Some places also have slightly lower salary because they have wicked good benefits as well.

    I bet the view is nice. How is your work/life balance? Are you able to do things on your time off?

    I maybe a consummate nerd who loves playing with computers but I like my time-off to be mine.
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  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    ssampier wrote: »
    Yes, I would say probably 1/3 of the jobs I have applied require a salary history to be enclosed.

    In my mind salary histories are a bit unfair to the potential employee - mine shows one salary less than $20k/yr when I was still cutting my teeth in the industry. My salary range now is more than double that.

    And it is a double edged sword. If your slaray history is low, they will low ball you. If it is too high, they won't consider you for the position. Of course there are exceptions to this.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
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