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[Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
edited January 22 in IT Jobs / Degrees
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  • Mojo_666Mojo_666 Posts: 438Member
    I was dealing with a guy from ESET who had his MCSA in his sig, I thought I was pretty cool, it is not something I do but I do not have an issue with it as such.
  • thenjdukethenjduke Posts: 894Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    You know this is not a bad idea. I deal with enough IT with my personal email to have these certifcation logs. I did work hard for them. I will not do it on resume but I do display them at my home office. I actually had one person the other day on the phone which was really impressed that I had all those certifications.
    CCNA, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDST, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, Working towards Networking BS. CCNP is Next.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Posts: 2,989Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I think it depends. I know if I were a contractor that supported a bunch of sites, or worked in technical sales or support it could be a good thing.
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Posts: 2,116Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Yes absolutely, I was dealing with someone in an NHS hospital regarding an anonymous website attack (of a libelous nature). After some back & forth he emailed me and his signature said he had CISSP and I have to say I was impressed. As for adding it to your personal email address - not so much.
  • ClaymooreClaymoore Posts: 1,637Member
    My company has a preferred signature format for us consultants and they ask that we use the cert abbreviations but not the logos. The logos can change the spam confidence level of an email because of all the imbedded image spam that was flooding inboxes.

    Some people still include the images, though. We have a guy who went crazy with the MS custom logo builder and has logos that include every cert he has. It annoys me when he replies to an email chain because I will have to scroll past half a page of MCTS logos to read the original email.

    Including the cert abbreviations helps us establish a technical baseline when communicating with consultants and customers across the country whom we have never met. Like Asif said, when the guy responds to a security email and he has a CISSP in his signature you probably pay more attention to his response.
  • subl1m1nalsubl1m1nal Posts: 176Member
    I display my certs on my work email signature. It's not so much that I want to rub it in people's faces. I just want people to know they're not dealing with an idiot IT guy (I think we've all ran into them before).

    That and I am proud of them. They cost money and they give me credibility.
    Currently Working On: 70-643 - Configuring Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure

    Plans for 2010: MCITP:EA and CCNA
    70-648 - Done
    70-643 - In progress
    70-647 - Still on my list
    70-680 - Still on my list

    www.coantech.com
    www.thecoans.net
    www.facebook.com/tylercoan
    www.twitter.com/tylercoan
    www.linkedin.com/users/tylercoan
  • subl1m1nalsubl1m1nal Posts: 176Member
    No logos, just a simple list. My contact info goes on my regular signature. Then my reply signature just has my name, position, and list of certs.
    Currently Working On: 70-643 - Configuring Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure

    Plans for 2010: MCITP:EA and CCNA
    70-648 - Done
    70-643 - In progress
    70-647 - Still on my list
    70-680 - Still on my list

    www.coantech.com
    www.thecoans.net
    www.facebook.com/tylercoan
    www.twitter.com/tylercoan
    www.linkedin.com/users/tylercoan
  • it_consultantit_consultant Posts: 1,903Member
    I used to put the logos too, but as someone mentioned they often get stripped out of the email by anti spam filters, then my email looks really silly.

    I ought to list my certs when I deal with other IT people, it gives them a quick rundown of what I should be familiar with.

    There is another problem no one mentioned. Sometimes people have a cert that I think is useless. Like the CISSP (big deal in government contracting work), has a reputation as the premier security certification, but compared to the CCSP or the CEH (certified ethical hacker) its weak. The CISSP might be the best security guy on the planet, but when I see that in his sig line I think "Oh no, not one of THESE guys".
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    My company doesn't allow us to display our certifications.
  • AldurAldur Juniper Moderator Posts: 1,460Member
    Typically for intra-office email I won't. Everybody here knows me and they know and they know what I can do.

    If it's somebody I don't know or don't work with very often I'll include my sig which has my IE certs and contact info. Other then that I would feel like I'm bragging and nobody likes that.

    On a side note I would recommend not putting any entry/associate level certs in a sig no matter what. It just seems silly to me. icon_silent.gif
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
  • DevilWAHDevilWAH Posts: 2,997Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I think mutiply signatures is the way to go.

    you shouldl know who you are emailing and what they would expect.

    A new coustomer will probable like to see that the person looking after them is certified.

    However an older customer is likely to be well aware of your skills and does not need to have them force apaon them every time they recive a mail.
    • If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
    • An arrow can only be shot by pulling it backward. So when life is dragging you back with difficulties. It means that its going to launch you into something great. So just focus and keep aiming.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    Aldur wrote: »
    Typically for intra-office email I won't. Everybody here knows me and they know and they know what I can do.

    If it's somebody I don't know or don't work with very often I'll include my sig which has my IE certs and contact info. Other then that I would feel like I'm bragging and nobody likes that.

    On a side note I would recommend not putting any entry/associate level certs in a sig no matter what. It just seems silly to me. icon_silent.gif

    Hey now thats all my certs! icon_lol.gif
  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    When I have significant certs which are pertinent I might one day put them in the signature. I'll never list the minor ones though. No CompTIA or MCTS in my signature and definitely no logos.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Not many people do it where I work, there are a few CISSP's and CCNA's running around but that is about it. When I complete MCSE I intend to place it in my signature. If nothing else, maybe someone on the server team will notice it and consider me for an opening.

    I could do MCSA, but I don't feel that is anything to brag about at the moment.

    What I do discourage is listing ALL of your certifications. 1 or maybe 2 is certainly acceptable.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • ColbyGColbyG Posts: 1,264Member
    I list the NP and IP. It's not really to show off or because I think people care; it's because I'm hoping for some modicum of trust/respect when emailing another technical person. My company is pretty big and a lot of my emails go to people I've never met or spoken to.

    When I see someone has the CCNP, or CCIE, or whatever, I assume a certain level of knowledge. It's a simple way to roughly guage someone's knowledge from a simple email. I hope it works the other way when I send an email as well. If I need something from an engineer in California, or Europe, or wherever, someone I've never spoken to before, I hope they look at my certs and think I might have some clue instead of assuming I'm an idiot.
  • DevilWAHDevilWAH Posts: 2,997Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    ColbyG wrote: »
    I list the NP and IP. It's not really to show off or because I think people care; it's because I'm hoping for some modicum of trust/respect when emailing another technical person. My company is pretty big and a lot of my emails go to people I've never met or spoken to.

    When I see someone has the CCNP, or CCIE, or whatever, I assume a certain level of knowledge. It's a simple way to roughly guage someone's knowledge from a simple email. I hope it works the other way when I send an email as well. If I need something from an engineer in California, or Europe, or wherever, someone I've never spoken to before, I hope they look at my certs and think I might have some clue instead of assuming I'm an idiot.

    I think thats exactly it, However I would only put my highest and specilised certs on a signature. People who will find it usefull (such as other network engineers) know the order of certs so no need to list a CCNA when you have a CCIE.
    • If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
    • An arrow can only be shot by pulling it backward. So when life is dragging you back with difficulties. It means that its going to launch you into something great. So just focus and keep aiming.
  • ColbyGColbyG Posts: 1,264Member
    Yea, I agree. That's why I don't list my lower stuff, only the top and or lateral certs. And only stuff that applies to my job, which is why I don't have the JNCIA on there and likely won't add the ITIL despite the fact that I only have it because I'm forced to by my company.
  • Hyper-MeHyper-Me Posts: 2,059Banned
    I've never seen any issue with doing it unlessy our company forbids it.

    I see it as more a self-pride thing than anything (no, not selfISH or stuckup).

    Anyone who honestly gets bothered by what someone has in their email signature is just jealous or a drama queen looking to start trouble. Which is precisely why I listed my bigger certs in my signature at my previous job...it royally pissed off another guy i was working with, to the point that if i was in the room he would fire up conversations with other people on how he thinks certification as a whole is pointless and worthless.
    I got a fortune cookie that said "Outlook not so good" and I thought to myself "Yeah...but Microsoft sells it anyway."
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member
    I used to at my last company but don't here because no one else does and I like to fly under the radar. I know what my accomplishments are, they're in my cube, and I'm fine with that. There is far less competition for certs here than there was at my last job. Dynamik and I have given each other heartburn in the cert race many times :) Heck my new co workers didn't know I was a SANS mentor until a few days ago...
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
    CCNA Security | GSEC |GCFW | GCIH | GCIA
    [email protected]
    http://twitter.com/paul_bosworth
    Blog: http://www.infosiege.net/
  • chmorinchmorin Posts: 1,446Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    ColbyG wrote: »
    Yea, I agree. That's why I don't list my lower stuff, only the top and or lateral certs. And only stuff that applies to my job, which is why I don't have the JNCIA on there and likely won't add the ITIL despite the fact that I only have it because I'm forced to by my company.

    ITIL is about to be forced on me as well. Is it as annoying as everyone in my department seems to make it?
    Currently Pursuing
    WGU (BS in IT Network Administration) - 52%| CCIE:Voice Written - 0% (0/200 Hours)
    mikej412 wrote:
    Cisco Networking isn't just a job, it's a Lifestyle.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    chmorin wrote: »
    ITIL is about to be forced on me as well. Is it as annoying as everyone in my department seems to make it?

    Over the past few months my company is like 150-2 on passes. What do you expect when the instructor rattles off all of the questions and answers?

    That is why I don't have any respect for ITIL, everyone just **** it. (But I do want to get it to slap it on my resume)
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • ColbyGColbyG Posts: 1,264Member
    chmorin wrote: »
    ITIL is about to be forced on me as well. Is it as annoying as everyone in my department seems to make it?

    I think it's subjective. It was horrible for me because I couldn't get into the material, nor do I care much about what's being spewed at me. It's not my kind of cert. A Cisco/networking cert is fun for me because I love the technology. ITIL isn't like that for me... at all.
  • snokerpokersnokerpoker Posts: 661Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I use to put MCSA in my email signature at my last job. It turned out to be a good thing because it showed that I was working on learning more and some people respected me more. At that job everyone was IT so they understood what it meant. At my current job nobody knows anything about certifications (or cares for that matter) so I don't put it in there. But reading this thread has made me contemplate putting them back on.
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    I have some of my certs in the office. Having the certifications in the office prevents inevitable measuring contests with some people. I do not have them in my email signature as there is a required format on the networks I work on.

    That being said if I had an RHCE, GSE, MCSE, CCIE or CISSP I would post that in the signature block at other jobs if it was authorized.
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Posts: 4,024Member
    If your certs are appropriate to the work you're doing, then I'm of the opinion that it's ok to list them as part of your signature. Listing a CCNA when you're a DBA or programmer seems a little odd.
  • colemiccolemic Posts: 1,568Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I used to put the logos too, but as someone mentioned they often get stripped out of the email by anti spam filters, then my email looks really silly.

    I ought to list my certs when I deal with other IT people, it gives them a quick rundown of what I should be familiar with.

    There is another problem no one mentioned. Sometimes people have a cert that I think is useless. Like the CISSP (big deal in government contracting work), has a reputation as the premier security certification, but compared to the CCSP or the CEH (certified ethical hacker) its weak. The CISSP might be the best security guy on the planet, but when I see that in his sig line I think "Oh no, not one of THESE guys".

    You seriously think that the CISSP is 'weak' compared to CEH? And it's useless? Seriously?

    You are comparing apples and oranges, CISSP is geared more towards managerial functions and a broad overview, while CCSP and CEH are narrow-focused, technical certs. Both kinds have their value, and both have their place. One type is not better than the other.
    Working on: CCSP, definitely, maybe. On the twitters: @mcole1008
  • it_consultantit_consultant Posts: 1,903Member
    Your right, the CISSP is geared to a different type of professional. And no, I have not had good experiences working with them specifically because the CISSP is "a mile wide and an inch deep" to put it mildly. I worked in government contracting where the CISSP is held as the gold standard, not surprisingly this is also where I picked up my negative attitude towards that cert and ITIL.

    In the private world CCSP and CEH are valued for people who actually work as security analysts where they may have to perform a forensics investigation on security and privacy breaches etc.

    I see you have a CISSP, and I don't mean to devalue the time and effort you put into achieving said certificate, I understand the test is not easy by any standard.
  • colemiccolemic Posts: 1,568Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Your right, the CISSP is geared to a different type of professional. And no, I have not had good experiences working with them specifically because the CISSP is "a mile wide and an inch deep" to put it mildly. I worked in government contracting where the CISSP is held as the gold standard, not surprisingly this is also where I picked up my negative attitude towards that cert and ITIL.

    In the private world CCSP and CEH are valued for people who actually work as security analysts where they may have to perform a forensics investigation on security and privacy breaches etc.

    I see you have a CISSP, and I don't mean to devalue the time and effort you put into achieving said certificate, I understand the test is not easy by any standard.

    No offense taken... and while I am a GoCo, in the private world, I still would not expect a security analyst who performs the tasks you mentioned above to rely on a CISSP as proof of technical knowledge... but if was the individual that managed those analysts, I absolutely would.
    Working on: CCSP, definitely, maybe. On the twitters: @mcole1008
  • CChNCChN Posts: 81Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    subl1m1nal wrote: »
    I just want people to know they're not dealing with an idiot IT guy (I think we've all ran into them before).

    A bunch of letters next to your name doesn't necessarily suggest you're not an idiot IT guy.
    RFCs: the other, other, white meat.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    CChN wrote: »
    A bunch of letters next to your name doesn't necessarily suggest you're not an idiot IT guy.

    No but it at least sets you off on the right foot. If you have the credentials and you sound somewhat knowledgable, then they probably won't question you.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
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